Would change schools if you were in this situation? Compare these schools and tell me what do you think.

(15 Posts)
NobodyIsHere Mon 17-Feb-14 21:19:34

If you like comparing schools help me please.

Dd (6, Y2) went to the best school in the area for nursery and it was my first choice but for reception she ended up in another one which was my 5th choice.

She is happy and progressing at her current school but she is dyslexic and apparently just before the half therm she was moved form the bottom set to the middle set (I think).
Last time I spoke to her teacher in December she was 1a/1b across the curriculum.

However I think there is the probability that she will be offered a place at my 2nd choice school for Y3 and I am not sure if I should accept the place or not.

Here is the comparison.

*Current school - 0.3 miles away
Pupils on roll - 239
EAL - 60.9%
FSM - 36.1%
SEN - 7.1%
Achieving Level 4 or above in reading, writing and maths - 83%
Making expected progress - 92%
KS2 average level/pupil - 4B
Ratio pupils/teachers - 17.1
Ofsted - Outstanding 2013

*Other school - 0.8 miles away
Pupils on the roll - 401
EAL - 29%
FSM - 5.2%
SEN - 8.5%
Achieving Level 4 or above in reading, writing and maths - 88%
Making expected progress - 97%
KS2 average level/pupil - 5C
Ratio pupils/teachers - 20.1
Ofsted - Outstanding - 2008

So the current school is smaller and closer to home and for me this is a bonus. But the other school has an award for their work with dyslexic pupils. However I am afraid that Dd will be a ghost in there, the school is bigger and the children are there from the start...will Dd make friends and be known if she starts in Y3? She is outgoing and popular and the staff at her current school know her very well.

WWYD?

schmee Mon 17-Feb-14 21:23:17

I wouldn't move her unless you felt that the dyslexia provision was inadequate at the current school. But that's without knowing the schools. You don't seem unhappy with the current school.

NobodyIsHere Mon 17-Feb-14 21:28:25

I am not unhappy with the current school at all a part from some shouty parents at the school gate

And I always knew that Dd had a difficulty with literacy and the dyslexia diagnoses didn't come as a surprise. However, how would I know if the dyslexia provision is inadequate??

itsahen Mon 17-Feb-14 22:54:54

I wouldn't move unless you are sure that you will gain. I like a local school. I would try and quantify exactly what you would get as a result of a move. I prefer big schools due to extra facilities but the only way is to visit the school And explore in detail with the staff etc

NobodyIsHere Mon 17-Feb-14 23:29:05

If the other school offers Dd a place, do we have the right to go and visit before making a decision?

mrz Tue 18-Feb-14 08:25:07

If she's happy and making progress I wouldn't consider moving.

pointythings Tue 18-Feb-14 08:37:48

I'd like to point out that it is far harder to get Ofsted Outstanding in 2013 than it was in 2008. Ofsted is far from being everything, but it is an issue and schools do sometimes 'coast' on a good reputation and an easy intake.

I wouldn't move, especially if your DD is progressing.

NobodyIsHere Tue 18-Feb-14 10:30:37

YY the ofsted thing. I am itching to know the outcome when the new school is inspected again. However I am not happy with 'outstanding' either. I could be wrong but will they manage to keep up in the top or will they go downhill from now on? Also the results for the current school are not so great but it is in a more or less deprived area and the parents not always are supportive of the school and I imagine most of them don't nurture the children at home either. The current school had a very active PTA and it is a naice area where the parents had to attend a specific church linked to the school. I suspect they are pushy and competitive. Oh and I forgot to mention that the current school can't offer breakfast club or a range of after school clubs due to lack of interest whereas the other school offers breakfast club and loads of after school club + wrap around care too.

NobodyIsHere Tue 18-Feb-14 10:36:53

The current school had a very active PTA and it is a naice area where the parents had to attend a specific church linked to the school. I suspect they are pushy and competitive. Oh and I forgot to mention that the current school can't offer breakfast club or a range of after school clubs due to lack of interest whereas the other school offers breakfast club and loads of after school club + wrap around care too. This bit should be for the OTHER school. The CURRENT one is the opposite.

WooWooOwl Tue 18-Feb-14 10:46:25

The other school must have had an inspection more recently than 2008, can you find any more up to date information?

Going on what you have, I'd prefer a school with pushy parents rather than deprived or disengaged parents, even if the quality of teaching and the extras like after school care were identical. I think parental attitudes make a huge difference to the attitudes of their children, and I would not want my child to be educated alongside children from families who largely don't value education.

Keep her where she is and keep a close eye on the support she receives for her dyslexia - you could create a whole load of settling in and social problems moving her unnecessarily when she is perfectly happy and progressing well where she is, and it is closer to home to boot! I see no convincing reason to move and lots of reasons to stay where she is.

NobodyIsHere Tue 18-Feb-14 11:16:07

But my question is:

How do I know if she is progressing well or if her progress is just mediocre???

Wouldn't she benefit from a school with a dyslexia award and with children from parents that care?

The current school try and make an effort for interesting activities but parents don't see the value of paying £1 a week for this. Of course they have the money, you can see them smoking and drinking energy drinks at the gates or even "talking" to the drug dealers who hang around at 3pm.

Some of them are so nasty to their kids shouting and swearing at them even in school grounds, it is disgusting.

But the school and the stuff are excellent and I never had any complaints what so ever.

In reality, I am closer to the current school parent's stereotype (immigrant/working class/renting/keeping afloat) etc, than the other school parent's (middle class/own house/big cars/skiing holidays) etc, but I want the best for my child and I am engaged in her overall education so I see myself similar to the other parents in this aspect.

Also, my working life will change dramatically from next year and the lack of breakfast club and wrap around care will make it hard for me to go to work.

However, my main wish is for my daughter to be happy and have friends and also achieve the best she can...

I wish I had a crystal ball.

NobodyIsHere Tue 18-Feb-14 11:17:01

the school staff are excellent...

If you are going to need the wrap around care it may be worth moving her sooner rather than later - but if she is happy where she is I would be very reluctant to move personally... I would rate her being settled and happy with a friendship group above being in a new situation where she knows nobody and will have to hope she manages to break into established friendship groups above a dyslexia award UNLESS her dyslexia is not being addressed where she is and she is struggling.

As you are an engaged and supportive parent she will do well enough at primary at either school to have the basis to succeed at secondary, but what you cannot give her is a peer group, if the move to the new school doesn't go well and she is left out and lonely there.

NobodyIsHere Tue 18-Feb-14 13:05:29

Thanks, that is a nice input.
We weren't offered the place yet so it is all speculation at the moment.

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