School friends from deprived families

(456 Posts)
poppytin Mon 09-Dec-13 10:48:25

DS1 just started reception in September. We didn’t get our first choice of school which could be seen from our house due to oversubscription and sibling rule. DS1 now goes to second choice school which is in a more deprived area although the school has performed rather well and been improving. We’re 7th on the waiting list for first choice school which has very low turnover so chances of getting in are pretty slim. I have no issue with the school as given its circumstances ie high FSM and SEN its performance is very good. However I can’t seem to make myself like the families of the children there. At the school gate I’ve met people in their pyjamas, with cigarettes on their fingers, piercings on etc. I’ve seen people shouting/swearing at each other in the playground while waiting for their children. DS was invited to a birthday party of one of the boys in his class and it was the worst house I’ve ever set foot in. Mom was in nightie with a cig on when we arrived at mid day. DS1 appears to be academic, loves reading and writing, both DH and I have masters from redbrick units and are in professional jobs, our house is walled with books and CDs.

DS loves his school and teachers which is the main reason I’m using to calm me down. However I worry whether the environment where his friends grow in would have an impact on him and his education.

Any opinions?

Kyrptonite Mon 09-Dec-13 10:52:45

Well it might help him grow up with an unbiased outlook on life and stop him being a snob.

As obviously he won't learn that at home.

Kyrptonite Mon 09-Dec-13 10:53:45

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Goldchilled7up Mon 09-Dec-13 10:55:34

confused Lol grin

CecilyP Mon 09-Dec-13 10:56:35

Think of it as sociological research!

Strawberrykisses Mon 09-Dec-13 10:56:52

biscuit

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comemulledwinewithmoi Mon 09-Dec-13 10:57:24

You will get slated. I would be out of there.

CalamitouslyWrong Mon 09-Dec-13 10:57:41

I find it hard to believe that a mother hosted a birthday party in her house wearing a nighty.

Moomoomie Mon 09-Dec-13 10:58:50

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Strawberrykisses Mon 09-Dec-13 11:00:01

Actually, sod it, I do hav something to say.
I'm from a deprived family. I was in the top set all through school, I got excellent exam results, I was in the gifted and talented programme, I graduated uni with a DipHE in nursing studies and I worked as a nurse before I had my children.
I'm sure I was a terrible influence on the more well off children.

Timetoask Mon 09-Dec-13 11:00:24

I think mixing with like minded people is important, your child will spend most of his day learning, playing at school, the early years are important in learning social skills and how friendships work, etc.
If your case, I would look to moving area or going to fee paying school until a place became available at your chosen school.

NigellasLeftNostril Mon 09-Dec-13 11:00:32

you do sound like a snob.
as for "the families of the children there" I bet they are not all 'like that' by any means, you are choosing what to notice.
also,
does "both DH and I have masters from redbrick units and are in professional jobs, our house is walled with books and CDs" mean that you are superior to the estate mums (who love their kids just like you do) in every aspect then?
I bet you live in a famous south coast city, am I right?

randomquicknamechange Mon 09-Dec-13 11:00:36

Are you aware that smoking, having piercings and going out in your pjs or wearing your nightdress in the day doesn't make you a bad person.

ReallyTired Mon 09-Dec-13 11:00:49

I think a big issue is YOU rather than the families of your son's classmates. Having a Masters from a red brick uni does not turn you into any kind of saint. Having a house full of books does not make you a better human being.

My daughter goes to a school in a deprived area and none of the parents wear pjyamas to school. Some of the mums wear trackie bottoms from Primark though. Having dodgy dress sense prehaps the lack of money to spend on decent clothes does not make someone a bad person.

There are people with body piecings, but the person with body piercings is often a friendly human being under all the bling if you are polite and friendly yourself.

Rather than critising these people, prehaps you with all your money should think how to make these people's lives better. You could get involved with the PTA or listen to reading if work commitments allow. If you lack time then prehaps you can donate money.

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Kyrptonite Mon 09-Dec-13 11:01:51

I've never read a thread before that's made me want to climb into mumsnet and shake someone.

And I've been here 3 years with my tattoos, piercings and degree

Timetoask Mon 09-Dec-13 11:02:00

I don't think OP is worried about the children being from a deprived area (i.e. less financially able), she is worried about the general behaviour of the grown ups around these children.

ReallyTired Mon 09-Dec-13 11:02:39

I imagine it a matter of time before mumsnet delete this thread with a hilerous deletion message.

lalouche Mon 09-Dec-13 11:02:45

You're sadly going to get flamed from lots of people who actually secretly would think exactly the same as yousmile I am not a snob - my family were cleaners and factory workers and I have friends doing all sorts of jobs from university professor to catalogue delivery. But I wouldn't think much of any parent who smoked and swore in the school playground, especially not if they were still wearing their pyjamas. People who say differently on here are being disingenuous.

Preciousbane Mon 09-Dec-13 11:03:29

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

MrsOakenshield Mon 09-Dec-13 11:05:02

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Only1scoop Mon 09-Dec-13 11:06:18

Given your 'Redbrick' degree and fabulous careers....maybe send your already academic dc to a Private school and pay for his education, as you are so scathing about having to endure the 'awful' crowd at the gates....

DesperatelySeekingSedatives Mon 09-Dec-13 11:06:45

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Only1scoop Mon 09-Dec-13 11:06:57

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