When do children stop needing to sound out words they've seen many times?

(82 Posts)
AcrylicPlexiglass Fri 06-Dec-13 20:08:23

My daughter is in reception and being taught phonics. She seems really good at sounding out and blending simple cvc words but it doesn't seem like she is getting to the stage where many words are entering her long term memory- ie every time she sees a word it's as if she's never seen it before and she has to use her phonic knowledge to work out what it says. She is able to do this successfully but it makes reading a whole sentence, even a short one, kind of laborious! Is this fairly normal or something to worry about?

maizieD Wed 11-Dec-13 11:20:27

they should move towards pictorial / memory based learning in context much sooner and save phonics to the early stages.

Why?

If you want me to read a link please repost it.

You only had to scroll back up the page a little bit. Now you'll have to back a page..

wonderingagain Wed 11-Dec-13 11:45:23

Maizie were you involved in writing this document?

lougle Wed 11-Dec-13 11:57:29

masha, I applaud your academic knowledge of the history and development of the English Language. It must frustrate you that the rest of us don't understand the complexities of the development of the system. I'm more interested in how children today learn to read and write the English language of today.

maizieD Wed 11-Dec-13 12:14:43

Maizie were you involved in writing this document?

Good Heavens, no! Why do you ask?

It's just the data from one of the well known SP/LP phonics programmes. I linked to it because it shows excellent results for spelling when you were implying that spelling would get worse because of phonics instruction.

Mashabell Wed 11-Dec-13 18:56:12

Lougle
I'm more interested in how children today learn to read and write the English language of today.

And i don't blame u for it.
I am very interested in that too and have been very much involved in helping my grandchildren with that, but because of my familiarity with several other languages, i am also keenly aware that learning to read and write English takes an exceptionally long time, because it is the most irregularly spelt alphabetically written language and that it could be easily much improved.

For pupils in the lower half of the ability range, for whom coping with the irregularities of English spelling is especially difficult, the long time they need for learning to read and write is especially disadvantageous. It leaves them less time and energy for other learning and is also demotivating.

For a country as a whole, having a more learner-friendly spelling system, like Finnish or Korean, has enormous advantages. Finland and Korea both had rotten, learner-unfriendly spelling systems before they modernised them.

mrz Wed 11-Dec-13 19:06:33

masha, I applaud your academic knowledge of the history and development of the English Language. grin

mrz Wed 11-Dec-13 19:10:08

I use the linguistic phonics programme from MaizieD's link and our children all have spelling ages at least equal to their chronological age.

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