Should I be worried about the issues Y1 DD has with reading and numbers - school don't seem to be? (long and detailed)

(31 Posts)
screamingeels Fri 01-Nov-13 18:21:10

DD struggles with reading and even more so with numbers. She has some deficits or errors which seem peculiar to me (ok - which scream dyslexia to me) but when I've raised them with her teachers, and the inclusion co-ordinator they've just shrugged and said some children are slower and they don't think DD is outside the norms. And whilst I know every mumsnet child starts school as a free reader, in real life I know loads that struggled and didn't get it until Y1 or Y2, so I elected to not stress about it whilst she was in reception.

So now she is in Y1 - and I am beginning to worry. As an October born, she is already 6 and one of the oldest in the class. It appears to me that she has made very little progress so far this term and has slid back in some areas.

I'd be really interested to know if anyone has had similar experiences with their DC and how it turned out. I'm wondering if I'm being over-anxious or if I should push school harder?

She can sound out about 25 phonic sounds (a sound for each letter and 'oo'; 'ee' etc.)
She can blend CVC and CVCC words (although not as well as she could do before the holidays)
Instead of blending she tends to make wild guesses based on the last letter she's sounded out so she might say "m-o-p" "pig?"; 'pat?"; "pop?"
She can't deal with decodable 2 syllables words and thinks the fact that in combination letters make different sounds is "odd!".
She cannot sight read at all - so we have hfw flashcards (I realise they are the devils work and have ditched them) but the point is that even after having them for 9 months she still sounds them out every single time; and when reading a CVC type book she will recognise the same word appears in concurrent sentences but won't know what it is, even though she has read it 4 words previously.

On numbers she can count to about 60 (she's a bit hit and miss on the 20/30/40 etc) which is the only progress she seems to have made this year.
She can do real life maths, are there enough chairs for dinner - cakes for all of us etc. but nothing in the abstract.
She cannot recognise the numbers 0 -10 reliably, she knows no number bonds.
If you ask her how old she is, she will hold up six fingers but cannot tell you 'I am six' until she has counted her fingers.

We had parents evening just before half term, and I laid out my concerns to her teacher, he just seemed really surprised and said he saw progress in her. However I'm not sure he knows anything about her at all. He didn't know what phonics she is doing as naturally because she's behind she's in a group being taught by the TA and on maths he asked if she uses the Sumdog site, I explained that we'd looked at it but as the entry level is number bonds its way beyond DD.

So am I being over-anxious and should I try and chill a bit longer, and if not what should I do? We try and do a bit of reinforcement with her every day, playing phonic and number games etc. this seems to stress her less than trying to read a book which often leads to tears. Do we just keep on going and wait for it to click?

FannyMcNally Sat 09-Nov-13 13:16:03

Phonics is a means to an end so I'm not sure why the teacher can't see how she's progressing with her general reading and spelling. I would be worried that she is being taught in a small group with the teacher either not being able to see progress and not discussing new strategies with the TA, or no progress is being made and the TA is being left to cope, or progress is being made and the teacher hasn't got a clue! Ditto maths.

FannyMcNally Sat 09-Nov-13 13:18:15

Oops. Just re-read and the teacher DID see progress. Am surprised he doesn't know what phonics she's learning or that he didn't bother to find out prior to parents' evening!

homebythesea Sat 09-Nov-13 13:22:57

Can I just comment on something you said about eyesight OP? You said that there were no obvious signs of issues with sight. However as a child who thought everyone couldn't see across the playground, and that balls disappeared when thrown, my eyesight issues were not "obvious" either! I didn't know any better so it may be worth having a free eye test just to dismiss this if anything. One if my children has a specific learning disability related to eyesight so this can be an issue

maizieD Sat 09-Nov-13 14:27:03

Instead of blending she tends to make wild guesses based on the last letter she's sounded out so she might say "m-o-p" "pig?"; 'pat?"; "pop?"

'Progressive' blending is your friend here! Instead of getting the child to sound out the whole word and then blend it, do it bit at a time. So, with 'mop' you'd get her to sound out and blend the first 2 sounds - /m/, /o/, /mo/. Make sure she is absolutely secure with the /m/, /o/, /mo/ by repeating it a few times, then add the /p/.

Emphasise that the 'sounds' don't have to be remembered for blending, they are there on the page and can be 'read' every time (I've encountered children who sound out the word, then shut their eyes and try to blend from 'memory' - it's not necessary.)

It may take a great deal of practice but it is worth persisting.

Mitzi50 Sat 09-Nov-13 21:38:10

Can she orally blend and segment? If she is unable to hear the sounds in words, I would have some concerns. If she is making wild guesses based on the last sound in words, it may be worth googling "recency effect dyslexia" to see if it

Mitzi50 Sat 09-Nov-13 21:43:22

Can she orally blend and segment? If she is unable to hear the sounds in words by year 1, I would have some concerns. If she is making wild guesses based on the last sound in words, it may be worth googling "recency effect dyslexia" to see if it rings any bells.

Also google activities which support development of phonological awareness.

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