National Curriculum levels removed and not replaced

(56 Posts)
mrz Sat 15-Jun-13 14:23:06

"As part of our reforms to the national curriculum , the current system of ‘levels’ used to report children’s attainment and progress will be removed. It will not be replaced."

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/teachingandlearning/curriculum/nationalcurriculum2014/a00225864/assessing-without-levels

mrz Sat 15-Jun-13 14:23:39

As part of our reforms to the national curriculum , the current system of ‘levels’ used to report children’s attainment and progress will be removed. It will not be replaced.

Tiggles Sat 15-Jun-13 14:38:11

Do I understand that right, that schools will now create their own levels? How would that work with national reporting and comparing of schools? Guess it stops comparative parenting.

ipadquietly Sat 15-Jun-13 14:56:21

'The new programmes of study set out what should be taught by the end of each key stage'

But their drafts set out a detailed curriculum about what should be taught in each year, and didn't exactly suggest that there would be 'freedom to develop a curriculum which is relevant to their pupils and enables them to meet these expectations'.
????? confused

spanieleyes Sat 15-Jun-13 15:30:15

So if we have a curriculum which sets out, for each subject, what should be taught in each year, then the next step will be to test each subject at the end of each year. Perhaps tests you pass or fail since we won't have levels. And what happens if you don't "pass" a year? Hmm,

Periwinkle007 Sat 15-Jun-13 15:44:17

? well that will be interesting then. nice for teachers as children move between classes and schools too.

Periwinkle007 Sat 15-Jun-13 15:44:59

how are ofsted going to measure then if they currently look for a certain level of improvement per child?

learnandsay Sat 15-Jun-13 16:54:24

The current driving test, in particular the theory part, is difficult for people to understand too, especially for non drivers. So the government has decided to do away with that too and now individual drivers will be able to choose what aspects of road safety they wish to focus on.

juniper9 Sat 15-Jun-13 17:04:00

But schools will stick to levels in reality, won't they? We've spent years trying to implement ways of tracking data between ks1 and ks2 as it was picked up on in our last ofsted. I can't imagine we'll just chuck the assessment folders out of the windows (although I would really like to. Might be a health and safety concern, actually).

soapboxqueen Sat 15-Jun-13 17:07:29

Maybe they will level a child using their year group if the curriculum is based on objectives a child should reach by the end of that year. So a year 3 child would get a 3 for reading, writing and maths if the were at the expected levels. An average year 4 child would have 4s across the board. A bright year 4 might get 5s across the board if they are wishing at objectives from the year above.

Just a thought.

soapboxqueen Sat 15-Jun-13 17:08:30

*working at objectives

not wishing

sittinginthesun Sat 15-Jun-13 17:20:20

I can't get my head around this. What if you have a year for who is currently a 5b in maths? Effectively working at a high year 6 level? Will they just measure by year?

AbbyR1973 Sat 15-Jun-13 19:11:26

Will children be assessed nationally at year 6/ year 2 (I know year 2 is a teacher assessment but papers are still sat.) If you have a national exam based assessment then you have to have a national scoring system. If you don't have a national assessment what is the solution at year 6 to help with streaming in the secondary education that follows. Also how do you compare performance between primary schools at exit level, what has the school added to its intake.

Feenie Sat 15-Jun-13 19:38:30

Steady on, there wasn't enough room on the back of the fag packet he scribbled it on to fit in that level of detail. grin

mrz Sat 15-Jun-13 19:40:07

I predict new tests in Y2, Y4 & Y6 based on the curriculum content with every child expected to be at the same point at the same time wink

Feenie Sat 15-Jun-13 19:41:36

I predict most schools clinging to levels anyway!

Euphemia Sat 15-Jun-13 19:42:25

This is the system in Scotland. We have Early Level, First Level and Second Level and no sub-levels within those, other than assessing whether pupils are Developing, Consolidating or Secure within each curricular area.

mrz Sat 15-Jun-13 19:45:34

That is similar to EYFS in England Euphemia

ipadquietly Sat 15-Jun-13 19:48:23

I can't square 'freedom within the curriculum' with the new drafts.
Unless the aim is that every school will be an academy by then and the draft curriculum will be scrapped.

Feenie Sat 15-Jun-13 19:50:59

You are right - makes v little sense atm. From previous changes, I get the impression that no one at the DfE really knows either.

Euphemia Sat 15-Jun-13 19:51:46

We do PIPS testing in P1, P3, P5 and P7, but otherwise there is no formal testing at primary level. Not prescribed by the government, at least.

Hassled Sat 15-Jun-13 19:53:18

I just don't understand how this will work. I don't understand how you can assess or monitor pupil progress effectively without those yardsticks.

ipadquietly Sat 15-Jun-13 19:58:01

Euphemia I thought the Scottish assessments could be done at any time as a summative assessment of an individual child's attainment? Or has it changed?

BabiesAreLikeBuses Sat 15-Jun-13 20:00:00

I'm not sure Mr Gove understands it either.
My head said he'd been told we were moving to assessing in a similar way to foundation with either meeting, not meeting or exceeding goals.
Glad we've spent so much time learning how to level and setting upba tracking system based on this.
It seems that the government would like all our little automatons children to achieve exactly the same at the same time, no better, no worse.

Euphemia Sat 15-Jun-13 20:02:27

In England you're used to having those yardsticks, which are explicit to parents.

In Scotland, teachers assess as they go along, and don't make public their findings. Parents are welcome to enquire how wee Jeannie is getting on, but they're used to not receiving assessment results so most don't bother, as long as their child is happy at school. I hope parents trust us to do our jobs!

School admission is not competitive in most parts of Scotland, so no need for league tables based on assessment results. League tables exist for secondary schools, based on S4, S5 and S6 exam results, but not for primary.

In my opinion, there's much less stress for pupils and parents!

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