How much sloppy work from the teacher should I tolerate before approaching the HT?

(220 Posts)
Alliwantisaroomsomewhere Wed 06-Mar-13 19:51:17

DS is in Yr 3 at a good enough school! There have been 2 or 3 minor spelling or grammatical errors in homework tasks which I have (very graciously grin) overlooked.

However, last term DS had to do some time telling homework ie write down what the time is on the clock face shown. Teacher marked all of the his work correct when over half was incorrect. I wrote a note to the teacher asking about it and she apologised profusely saying that she had marked the homework but had no idea how that had happened.

This week's homework for numeracy had a number pattern that was unfathomable and the literacy homework had a grammatical error that would have made the work confusing for children.

What really pissed me off a lot was that DS's literacy homework from last week was marked all incorrect when not only was it correct, but the week before's work was very, very similar and again all correct, but this was accepted by the very same teacher. Again I made a note in DS's literacy homework book, and all she has done is initial and date my comments.

The marking is very sloppy and I wonder whether I should raise all these issues with the HT or do I let it go and see if things improve. All parents recently received a note from the HT stating that moves were afoot to improve the quality of teaching and learning in the school.

Do I put up and shut up or speak up?

(sorry, very long and rather dull...)

thegreylady Sat 09-Mar-13 13:19:54

I think you need to tackle this now.I would ask for an after school meeting with the teacher and show her the examples of incorrect marking. Explain that if it happens again you will have to speak to the HT.
Your child is being given incorrect information and it is ridiculous that any teacher is unable to punctuate direct speech.I would also photocopy the incorrect marking before you speak to the teacher-just so it doesn't inexplicably disappear if she is challenged.
I was a teacher for 30+ years so know all about tiredness/workload etc but that is inexcusable.

purrpurr Sat 09-Mar-13 13:20:50

Except for the grammatical error in the post. Or was that intentional? You don't follow a full stop with lower case.

Feenie Sat 09-Mar-13 13:22:56

Which post?

TeamEdward Sat 09-Mar-13 13:24:34

I was being ironic, but I can see that it probably didn't work!
How about this?

Which of these sentences is grammatically correct?
"Michael Gove, for example, is a twat." said TeamEd
"Michael Gove, for example, is a twat," said TeamEd
"Micheal Gove for example is a twat," said TeamEd

purrpurr Sat 09-Mar-13 13:32:59

Ahh. Apologies, TeamEdward.

Feenie Sat 09-Mar-13 13:47:11

The full stop wasn't incorrect.

http://oxforddictionaries.com/words/punctuation-in-direct-speech

There should, however, have been a full stop at the end. smile

Feenie Sat 09-Mar-13 13:47:25
TeamEdward Sat 09-Mar-13 13:54:20

"Michael Gove, for example, is twat," said TeamEd. "Even adults don't educated understand English grammar." Then she went to rock quietly in the corner.

TeamEdward Sat 09-Mar-13 13:55:08

FFS! grin
That worked well, didn't it?

TeamEdward Sat 09-Mar-13 13:56:27

Apologies OP for the hijack.
But I will never tire of typing "Michael Gove, for example, is a twat."

Is there any chance the teacher is getting the children to do the marking? Ds3 was getting excellent results in his spelling tests, and I was very pleased, until the day when I actually saw his spelling test book (it didn't usually come home), and found out he was getting lots wrong.

His teacher was using the peer marking system, where he read out the right answers and the children marked eachother's tests - and whoever was marking ds3's was doing it incorrectly.

I complained to the school and the teacher - we needed to know that ds3 was having problems with his spelling, but both we and he had the impression that he was doing really well.

TeamEdward Sat 09-Mar-13 14:02:43

Peer marking is much more common in Yr3 than in KS1 in my experience. I think STDG may have a point...

ipadquietly Sat 09-Mar-13 14:09:21

I wonder if the homework was downloaded from the internet? There are lots of mistakes on internet resources! Perhaps the teacher didn't check it before sending it out.

ProphetOfDoom Sat 09-Mar-13 14:09:51

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

clam Sat 09-Mar-13 14:33:01

I would say that you absolutely must speak to the HT. S/he is directly accountable for standards of teaching and learning in the school and things like this would be pounced on, quite rightly, by their School Improvement Partner (or whatever they're called now - keep changing) and Ofsted.

You've already been decent about it and mentioned it to the teacher, yet nothing much has changed. Therefore the Head needs to deal with it. We just had a lecture meeting this week about how we as teachers are responsible and accountable for any errors in understanding given/made by TAs working with groups, even when outside the classroom. I'm sorry, but "being tired" just won't cut it as an excuse nowadays - and certainly not if it's a regular thing.

Feenie Sat 09-Mar-13 14:40:55

I have just these sorts of misgivings about ds's school, and am debating whether to make a fuss. Am already 'that parent' though, and am not sure it would make a difference. Just this year, we have had:

A letter home from a student, with a covering letter from her supervisor, asking me to fill in a 'question air'.
A letter headed 'Assembley Group' (underlined, big letters) from the Y5 teacher.
Assembly words for ds to learn with 'practise' spelled incorrectly.
A note in the reading diary which said 'Lovely reading well done. we was look at an fiction book' hmm
A display in the library informs everyone that Roald Dahl 'past away'.
A competition inviting children to design a poster for the 'quite corner'.

And that's just off the top of my head. sad

HumphreyCobbler Sat 09-Mar-13 14:50:09

oh dear Feenie. That sounds bad.

clam Sat 09-Mar-13 15:01:42

One of our Y2 teachers (no longer in our school) put up a sign at open evening inviting parents to look through their child's 'draw.'

One of my current colleagues has a real struggle with spellings (I think she's dyslexic). When it came up (again) this week, I offered that I was more than happy to check over things if she wanted, she laughed and said that it didn't really matter!

Feenie Sat 09-Mar-13 15:09:04

That's the point, isn't it - that some people really believe that. I think ds's school will think I am nitpicking! But this kind of thing seems endemic.

It's annoying enough that those mistakes are made - but worse that countless people walk past the error and don't sort it out either.

ProphetOfDoom Sat 09-Mar-13 18:03:53

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Feenie Sat 09-Mar-13 18:15:43

We use green grin

I may have sent the student's 'question air' back corrected....and absent mindedly changed 'confectionary' to 'confectionery' in a packed lunch survey and sent it back.

You can see why I am so popular there, can't you? grin

Michael Grove does tell us exactly what to call each punctuation mark. Is there anywhere a profession so micro managed and undermined?

I am a primary teacher. Your teacher obviously doesn't know the rules of punctuating speech. Much as I am normally totally against complaining about teachers, I think she needs to be sent on a course or make better use of google.

bangwhizz Sun 10-Mar-13 11:04:46

You are not nit picking, Feenie.This is exactly what I was talking about in a thread recently (which only person replied to and disagreed with me), the threat of seeming like a pushy parent is used to browbeat parents into accepting crap for their DC.
A mistake is one thing, but in the OPs case it seems as though the teacher really does not understand the material she is trying to teach. That needs flagging up higher up the chain of command.

PastSellByDate Sun 10-Mar-13 13:12:01

Hi AIWIARS

These things are very annoying. Our school perpetually sends spelling lists home with 'sentence case' style lettering (so first letter capitalised regardless of whether it is a proper noun or not).

We had a spelling list when DD1 was in Y1 with Christmas spelled totally in lower case. This was not the first time, this kind of thing had been happening all term so I actually complained directly to the HT instantly because this is a Christian Faith School, so I felt strongly there should be no excuse. Christmas play, Christmas themed everything in December, etc....

I was told:

"I had to understand that teacher's are hard working and since I had chosen a faith school I should forgive their mistakes and respect they're trying their best."

"I had to understand that teacher was new to Word for Windows version and didn't understand how to make words all lower case."

"I should see this as a minor error and shouldn't be wasting the Head's time over this."

By they way arbitratily capitalising first letter of words not usually capitalised continues now in Year 5 for DD1 - and DD1's written work is all over the shop in terms of capitalisations but I'm wrong to see any link in presentation of spelling list words as 'sentence case' of course. I just had a parent/ teacher meeting where I was told the school wanted us to work on DD1's arbitrary captilisation of words at home. DH and I exchanged pained look and DH politely queried whether it might help to receive spelling words presented as all lower case or sentence case as appropriate?

...and so the endless arguments about 'But Mum, that's how Mrs. X spelled it on our list continues....

I can understand a misspelled word or two in a letter, happens to all of us - especially if in a rush. I just don't get the spelling list thing. Seems odd not to spell 'television' all lower case, but 'Television'.

PastSellByDate Sun 10-Mar-13 13:13:55

speaking of which

should be 'By the way...

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now