KS1 SYLLABUS

(23 Posts)
carolb54 Mon 20-Sep-10 22:15:17

My daughter is now in year2, and I am a bit concern about her recent spelling test list given to her by her teacher. The list of words that she was given to learn at year 2 were for eg. royal, loyal, boyish, point, boiled and friends to name a few. Are these word syllabus that are relevant for a child in year 2 or is it relevant for a child in year 3? There are a list of high frequency words and non of the words mentioned above was on that list for KS1.

Should I be worried that the teacher has probably moved away from the syllabus for KS1?

carolb54 Mon 20-Sep-10 22:16:25

My daughter is now in year2, and I am a bit concern about her recent spelling test list given to her by her teacher. The list of words that she was given to learn at year 2 were for eg. royal, loyal, boyish, point, boiled and friends to name a few. Are these word syllabus that are relevant for a child in year 2 or is it relevant for a child in year 3? There are a list of high frequency words and non of the words mentioned above was on that list for KS1.

Should I be worried that the teacher has probably moved away from the syllabus for KS1?

RoadArt Mon 20-Sep-10 22:24:54

would expect a teacher to introduce new words each week. How else will they learn the language. These words are focussing on a particular sound, and you should find that each week you get a range of words of similar sounds or similar spellings.

Dont worry about moving away from the syllabus, that wont be happening.

paisleyleaf Mon 20-Sep-10 22:32:26

The BBC website has 'vowel phoneme' activities aimed at year 2 phonics that includes the sounds 'oi' 'oy' etc
So it sounds like the teacher's reading from the right page.

IndigoBell Tue 21-Sep-10 07:05:05

The KS1 syllabus does not just consist of 100 HF words.

They have clearly been learning the 'oy' 'oi' sound and are reinforcing that with spelling. This is what they should be doing!

Relax! The teacher knows what she is doing. Second guessing everything the teacher does is not going to help anyone.

mrz Tue 21-Sep-10 07:46:09

Actually carolb54 they are more relevant to a child in Y1 as that is when the literacy framework says they should be taught. The list of high frequency words were scrapped/replaced a number of years ago.

cory Tue 21-Sep-10 09:20:23

I think you need to step back a bit: you will have a miserable time if you keep watching like a hawk for fear that your dd should ever be taught something that isn't on the syllabus, and it won't enhance her educational experience either. Learning the 'oy' phoneme sounds good to me.

kim147 Tue 21-Sep-10 09:35:56

Looks like the "oi" phoneme to me. There is also a list of "tricky" words that children are expected to read and spell because they cannot be read easily using phonic knowledge.

Have a look at the Letter and Sounds document. Looks like they are doing Phase 5.

Teachers do not deviate from the KS1 syllabus. It's not allowed. We can develop a creative curriculum, but I could just imagine the discussion with OFSTED if they just said we were deviating from the curriculum.

lovecheese Tue 21-Sep-10 09:46:47

A note home with my DDs spellings, also in yr2, said that her group were on to phase 6 - this included words like disappeared.

RoadArt Tue 21-Sep-10 09:50:11

So are you not happy that your DC is being stretched?

I really dont see why these words are such a problem

carolb54 Tue 21-Sep-10 10:51:49

Thanks for all your comments. It has been useful.

To RoadArt, I am not unhappy with the words that are sent home for my child to learn. I just want to understand the difference between the High Frequency word list and the words that are sent home for them to learn. I do understand the need and the necessity for them to understand the different sounds. That I find very interesting and useful for all children to learn at this stage in their life.

I will probably arrange a meeting with the teacher. I am quite sure she will give me the same advise as above. As you all said they know best. I am just a mum who wants the best for their child.
smile

IndigoBell Tue 21-Sep-10 11:38:16

Arranging a meeting with the teacher is really overkill. Surely you have a parents meeting coming up anyway?

carolb54 Tue 21-Sep-10 16:15:23

Yes there is PTA meeting coming up shortly, but I rather address the issue now and use that meeting for the class teacher to address other issues that she sees more appropriate to be discussed then.

This arranged meeting will be on issues that I want to discuss and not issues that she already has planned on her agenda to be discussed with parents.

Again IndigoBell thanks for your input. hmm

mrz Tue 21-Sep-10 16:51:04

lovecheese I would expect Y2 children to be learning words with prefixes and suffixes such as disappeared.

mrz Tue 21-Sep-10 17:02:34

carolb54 as a Y2 teacher I would say that words such as annoyed, destroyed, decoy, royalty, enjoy, joined, spoiled, ointment would indicate that the teacher actually knows how to teach spelling effectively and isn't blindly following a obsolete random list.

lovecheese Tue 21-Sep-10 17:24:25

mrz I wasn't giving that word as an example of one I thought too hard, just giving the OP an idea of the next "jump" IYKWIM; And DD has had words like you have just given in yr1. I remember her teacher at parents evening at the end of reception saying that X had read all of the reception key words, and all of yr1 and yr2 aswell. Are "Key words" really obsolete now??

mrz Tue 21-Sep-10 17:52:09

lovecheese sorry if I confused you what I meant was that your daughter's teacher seems to be "organised" in that he/she is informing parents why/what they are doing regarding spellings.

carolb54 Tue 21-Sep-10 22:34:27

I definitely enjoy this forum. It has opened up my eyes to alot of things within the school environment. You hear so much by non teachers (ie parents)and you start to ponder what is right and what is wrong.

mrz, your comments I do appreciate. Coming from a Year 2 teacher, you have really opened up my mind about the class environment.

Again useful forum and input. smile

RoadArt Wed 22-Sep-10 00:08:28

I think if you have been researching and trying to find the words perhaps in readiness then you might be struggling.

There are so many words that kids need to learn and there isnt a standard list to follow. Some of the words my DC have had have been really obscure and quite often not even words they are likely to ever use in today's conversation.

They sometimes follow patterns, sometimes not. Some have similar sounds but different spellings, some might be topic spellings. Some might be "tricky" words that they just need to learn.

However, teachers usually know the capabilities of each group and will give them words that they feel the children can learn.

(I did what you are probably doing now, trying to understand the curriculum and what they learn and when. But I did struggle to find a lot of information that matched what they did in the classroom.)
Some teachers might give 20 words a week, other teachers only 5.

We never ever got the key words to learn at home, they must have learnt those at school and sadly we dont get any spelling at all now (Y4)

What is Phase 5, Phase 6, etc. NEver heard of this?

Feenie Wed 22-Sep-10 09:27:53
Feenie Wed 22-Sep-10 09:30:56
lovechocolate Wed 22-Sep-10 10:08:47

I am a Year 2 teacher. Just thought I would clarify that high frequency words/ key words (same thing, different name) are the most commonly used words. Lists still exist for Reception, Years 1 and 2. Children are expected to learn to read them and spell them. The lists were revised 3 years ago and are part of the 'Letters and Sounds' programme. The lists are not very long and many (not all) children know them within the first term of the year. That may be why you don't see them coming home.

The 'oi' 'oy' sounding words are all part of the phonic programme that was introduced to schools 3 years ago. It starts in Nursery/Reception (Phase 1 and 2) and runs through to Christmas in Year 2 (phase 6). It is a very fast paced and effective way of teaching phonics. The children are taught the different groups of letters that make the same sound (or phoneme as they are now called!). They then learn the rules and exceptions of when to use which one eg. 'oi' is usually at the beginning or in the middle of a word and 'oy' can be in the middle or end of a word. I was lucky enough to be part of the initial training for teachers then taking it across the borough I work in.

Road Art- in theory your child should have completed all the phonics programme by Year 4 and the emphasis moves onto grammar (look up Grammar For Writing on DFES website, its what years 3-6 use)

Carolb54 -Be really happy that your child's school is following Letters and Sounds, its a very structured programme and your child's reading and spelling will develop much faster as a result. Might be an idea to ask the teacher if an explanation of the spelling/phonics being taught could be sent home. I would imagine a lot of parents are feeling the same as you.

Hope that helps smile

carolb54 Wed 22-Sep-10 13:39:15

Thanks lovechoclate. Yes your response has helped me immensely. Coming from a Year 2 teacher has really helped me to understand the educational system much more.

Wish I had done this before. I have made an appointment to see dd class teacher. Now that I have found out all this, not quite sure if I should go and see her or just cancel the appointment.

Still contemplating what to do. I have until next week to either go or cancel the appointment. confused

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