Violent video Games

(4 Posts)
Crube Tue 27-Aug-13 22:34:51

To answer the specific question of any correlation between notable tragic events and the playing of violent videogames, there is as yet no proven link between the two. More research is always being conducted, but there is so much that is not independent, either funded by the games industry, or those bodies set against, and as such there is a lot of bias in the available research.

My personal belief is that videogames do not in themselves precipitate violence and tragedy, but if used to excess by people who have certain mental health issues, it can be a problem. But the underlying issue must be there int he first place.

As for the question of games being banned, I would refer you to Mark Twain; "Censorship is like me not allowed a steak because a baby can't chew it". Those games are not designed for children, and shouldn't be played by them. There are age ratings for the games, and the industry standard PEGI system is now legally binding to the same level as the BBFC classifications. Assuming that the shops do their job properly, which admittedly is not a given, it is down to the parents to control what access to these games their children have.

Personally, I feel that while videogames can be fun, and even educational depending on the game, there is too much emphasis on their place in society and children's use of them. More emphasis on kicking a ball ina field, or other outdoors activities and such are more beneficial. As the article linked says, parents are the ultimate influence, and if you feel uncomfortable about violent videogames, as is very justifiable and in my mind correct, you can take great steps in limiting their influence.

mummymooch Sun 11-Aug-13 11:10:23

I agree in my opinion violent video games should be banned how can there be anything positive in them ? Maybe allow them for adults but where is the sense in exposing children to violence in this "fun" way .

AbbyR1973 Tue 06-Aug-13 21:57:21

I am not sure whether there are any direct links between tragic world events and violent games/ TV. My guess is that if they are a factor they are only likely to be a small part of a bigger picture related to childhood experiences within the family.
Having said that it seems to me to be just plain wrong to expose particularly young children to games or TV with no other content than violence. My DS's aged 4 & 5 have limited screen time and are only allowed to watch certain channels when they do watch TV. Violent, fast edited cartoons such as Ben 10 are off limits. There is no way on earth I would let them near violent games. I was a bit annoyed last year because DS1 saw a friend getting onto a Ben 10 game at school. He thought he would have a go. The language is unpleasant (but not absolutely swearing)and there is no merit in it. The aim of the game was to bash up the bad guy until he died....that's it.
It's mildly irritating that I seem to be in the minority since most boys in the class engage in playing Ben 10. Clearly most parents aren't moderating their offsprings screen access. I'm less worried about headline tragedies but more about general behaviour, language and behavioural conditions that can be linked. Kids should be running around outside anyway not spending hours vegetating in front of boxes. This remains a recent change in childhood lifestyles and I think it's still to early to say what the long term impact of it all is. I am 40 and when I was growing up this stuff didn't exist. People need to be a bit more careful.

kimmills222 Tue 06-Aug-13 13:06:15

Want to know people's views on children playing violent video games as opposed to constructive and educational games? With so much happening in schools, marathons and elsewhere, are these violent video games responsible, in some way?

www.littlekingdomchildcare.com/blog/index.php/the-negative-influence-of-violent-video-games-on-kids/

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