DD is in SCBU, struggling to establish breastfeeding, any advice?

(50 Posts)
minipie Wed 07-Nov-12 21:50:23

DD was born unexpectedly at 34 weeks 10 days ago, so she is now 35+5. She had no breathing issues but has had jaundice and reflux related de saturation episodes and temperature issues. These at now largely sorted and the only thing keeping her at hospital is establishing breast feeding which I am struggling with.

I have a large milk supply and she feeds well some of the time, mainly in the evenings. However much of the time she falls asleep after only a very very short feed (a few sucks) or just doesn't wake up when she ought to be hungry.

Any advice? The nurses are lovely but they seem unsure what is best. Some advise holding off tube feeds and letting her get hungrier, others say she's in a sleepy phase and we should just wait for her to get more interested. We tried on demand feeding yesterday but she didn't feed much and today is back under uv lights for jaundice which I think means she didn't get enough yesterday sad and I feel so guilty. I don't want to rush her into full breastfeeding before she is ready but I would so love to take her home...

I know someone who took her twins home at this stage, still part tube feeding. But I think she had to fight the hospital and I am not sure I have the confidence to do that.

Any experience or thoughts most welcome... I really don't know what is the best course from here. Thank you.

sheeplikessleep Wed 07-Nov-12 21:57:07

Ds1 was born later at 37 weeks, but we were in a week as he was jaundiced, on bilibed and just always fell straight asleep and lost quite a bit of weight. We ended up down tube feeding route.

It's so hard, but I'm surprised they're saying to leave. They need milk to combat the jaundice, the jaundice makes them sleepy, they don't feed, tis a vicious cycle.

Few things we did
1 I breastfed whilst DS was being tube fed - they associate feeling full with breast feeding
2 we had 3 hourly tube feeds as I remember, I was having to express off enough for 70ml feeds each time (they did a calculation of how much milk they need in a 24 hour period taking body weight into account)
3 main thing is to get milk into your baby
4. Keep expressing if you can, even if you can't feed that much directly

Congratulations by the way, hope you are home very soon!!

sheeplikessleep Wed 07-Nov-12 22:01:38

I'm surprised the nurses aren't being more directional. Can you ask the paed on their next round?

PeriPathetic Wed 07-Nov-12 22:02:41

No helpful advice, I'm afraid. But felt I could share: my DD was born at 35 weeks, in SCBU for 2 with severe jaundice. No tubes after a couple of days. The nurses there told me that I HAD to bottle feed as in order to flush the toxins out of her system. So I expressed and bottle fed. We ended up doing mixed feeding, breast & bottle as it was the only way to get enough into her. They told me jaundiced babies are generally sleepy anyway, it's one of the symptoms (?)

Just keep trying. Wake her up during feeding if necessary. Should add that DD is now a fit, healthy & hormonal 11 year old...!

Hopefully someone with better advice wil be along very soon. Just keep at it, it will happen.

Rhubarb78 Wed 07-Nov-12 22:03:21

It sounds like she just doesn't have the energy yet to breastfeed properly, after all she wasnt planning to start all the breast feeding malarky for another 5 weeks! I haven't had a premmie baby but I have worked on scbu and to be honest there is nothing you can do really except wait it out. Would you be open to topping her breast feeds with a bottle? That may help you get home sooner but it also may adversely affect breast feeding. Sorry that's not much help, hope someone more knowledgeable comes along soon

bitsofmeworkjustfine Wed 07-Nov-12 22:07:37

i had DD at 31 weeks (4 pound 6), and she didnt breastfeed well, problems with Jaundice etc and was in NICU for a month.

I ended up expressing and tube feeding her, because it was less stressful for all of us, and she 'got the best stuff'

Sh is 9 in a fortnight, healthy, strong, active, fun, challenging, in fact, she is brilliant.....

good luck through the early days, they are so worrying xxx

minipie Wed 07-Nov-12 22:14:45

Thank you all. I had forgotten jaundice = sleepy, that could explain a lot. I have considered mixed bottle and breast (am expressing loads) but worry about nipple confusion etc. she has never had a bottle so far.

Yes I think I will see what the doctors say and in the meantime the main thing is getting the milk into her rather than pushing the breastfeeding.

Wake her up during feeding - if only I could! When she falls asleep she is out for the count. Being held by me seems to make her sleepier.

Thanks for the congratulations - she is lovely.

Haven't looked through this for a while, but this might be helpful: www.bestbeginnings.org.uk/fbtb-sick-or-pre-term.

Agree with others that if you're getting conflicting advice, find out which of the paeds/nurses are most expert on bf prems, and get them to talk your through what they recommend. And great that you've got a good supply going already - that's a fantastic start.

Huge congratulations on the birth of your dd too smile

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Has anyone suggested cup feeding? I don't know what the latest thinking is, but when I had ds (nearly 8 years ago <faints>) - who was also early & very very sleepy, one of my favourite mws was very keen on cup rather than bottle feeding to minimise any nipple confusion. Might be worth asking about?

sheeplikessleep Wed 07-Nov-12 22:23:13

Mini pie if I were you, I'd express as much as poss, use formula if you need to, tube feed at regular intervals
(Whilst breast feeding at same time to increase association) and get somebody who knows a bit more on the ward! They should be calculating how much milk your little one needs to flush out the jaundice. She needs milk to get more awake, then she'll feed so much better. Can you speak to a paed?

Welovecouscous Wed 07-Nov-12 22:23:56

Mini pie congratulations on your dd - we were on thyroid threads together though I am a frequent nc so you won't recognise me.

Sorry not to have any good advice on this sad

I think I'm right in remembering that you live in London? If so there are several really good La leche league groups there and the leaders would be really happy to help, I'm sure. If you are in north London there is a group based in stoke Newington.

FamiliesShareGerms Wed 07-Nov-12 22:30:28

DS was born at 35 weeks on 9th centile and we established bf by feeding as long as possible and with as long a gap as possible between feeds then tube (with formula) top ups. I couldn't express enough initially to top up feed with bf, then when my milk came in properly we had more or less moved off the tube. I remember one of the nurses said that he shouldn't feed for more than 20 mins at a time, if that helps.

Agree that the best thing to do is find a nurse who really understands bf for SCBU babies, work out a plan together and try to stick to it. I still think of the wonderful Janet, who I thought was a complete cow at first, but spent an hour with me in the middle of the night on about Day 3 making sure DS was properly latched and that I knew what I was trying to do, and who supported me bf when some of her colleagues would have been happier sticking a bottle in him

Congratulations, BTW! And another premmie here who is a lively, healthy, biggest-in-his-class, so please don't worry on that score

Flatasawitchestit Wed 07-Nov-12 22:33:18

I've had 3 prem babies, my latest one 4 weeks ago was born at 35/40 and in scbu. Similar problems to the ones you've listed.

My advise would be to try and cut out the tubes altogether if you can and go to cup feeding - after you have put baby to breast. When you pop her on does she latch ok?

Also is she on any type of monitoring now? Are you able to room in with her at all as from experience bf can pick up when you're it of the pressures / non privacy of scbu... more comfortable and relaxed

I would not give a bottle. She's got to still work at it, and in the long run outré maybe making more work for yourself.

I'd also avoid trying to go home with tubes, it yiu could go home with a cup and top up if needed and just make sure you get good bf support at home.

It's hard, and I know you're desperate to go home? I remember thinking I need to get this feeding cracked or ill be in here forever. This was after 3 solid days of trying. At 1pm on the 4th day she latched and stayed on and we haven't looked back - although she's still fussy on one side.

I cup / syringe fed and refused tubes and bottles of EBM in the time I was waiting for feeding to establish.

ImperialFireworksInMyKnickers Wed 07-Nov-12 22:34:51

ddtwins were born at 33+5 and like your LO went into SCBU, developed jaundice etc. I remember we used my expressed milk (which thankfully kicked in straight away) and tube feeding. They didn't really get the hang of actual breast feeding until about three weeks, and we were finally able to go home after 28 days. We did try cup feeding, dd1 was well up for it but dd2 didn't want to know.

They're 13 now, they've both had to stop 'borrowing' my shoes as their feet have outgrown mine, but they filched both my favourite evening dresses as Halloween costumes this year...

At least there is one positive from LO being in SCBU, and that is you get a few decent night's sleep in before the baby comes home grin

Best wishes and congratulations.

Flatasawitchestit Wed 07-Nov-12 22:34:55

Oh and skin to skin, as much as you can do - it really really helps.

bytheseaside Thu 08-Nov-12 05:58:34

Good luck op, you are doing brilliantly and it will work out really soon!
I second the advice about getting the hospitals most expert prem bf adviser to help you, there's bound to be someone, or la leche or nct adviser otherwise. We just turned a corner one day (when rooming in- made all the difference, worth fighting for) when feeds became less sleepy. I agree some nurses will not want you to tire baby, but i felt it was important to keep trying each feed, even if just for a couple of mins. getting support for this helped. once she was awake enough to feed for 15-20 mins most of the time, they dropped the topups to see how wed get on, and it was fine. We always started with nappy change to wake her up, and kept her coolish to feed. lovely skin to skin too, so it is so worth it even if your baby is mainly sleeping through all your efforts!

minipie Thu 08-Nov-12 11:37:27

thank you all. seaside, did they let you room in while dd was still sleepy and needing top ups? i had got he impression it is only allowed once the baby is demand feeding and the tube is out...

any ideas on how to get dd awake in the morning/daytime rather than eves/nights? or shd i go with her clock and try beige here at night to breatfeed ?

minipie Thu 08-Nov-12 11:42:51

thank you all again. the main issue is she just falls asleep after a very short feed, ie 1 or 2 min max, esp in morning. she has done long feeds of 10 or 20 mins but mostly late in the evenings. she is also quite awake in the nights i believe. she was the same in the womb.

any way to shift her body clock more towards the daytime? or should i ask to stay here all night and try feeding her through the night?

keeping her cooler for feeds s a good idea, will try that.

it sounds like most of you got feeding cracked by this point....except Fireworks, your experience sounds like mine.

Have the mws been able to give you any guidance on keeping her awake? With ds who was really sleepy when feeding, we were advised to:
- undress him partially to make him slightly cool
- tap his feet gently to keep him 'with' us
- do a nappy change midway though feeds to encourage him to wake up again & have some more

I think - although I may be imaging this - one mw also gave me a bowl of lukewarm water to wipe his feet with to keep him awake.

All of this may be very outdated, but the mws/docs really should be able to give some advice. Am a bit grrrr on your behalf that you're obviously not getting great support - although tbh, I think that's sadly common sad

In terms of switching her routine to daytime ... don't think there will be an easy solution to that one! So if you can do more evening visits/feeds, then I would absolutely go with that.

And yy to skin-to-skin - are you getting lots of kangeroo care time?

Incidentally, I don't want to suggest it was easy getting ds to bf - it was a slog, & he was born later than yours, so an easier job. And I did get bullied into bottle-feeding once or twice, as SOME of the mws kept telling me I needed to get milk into him if I wanted to get him home. But luckily, then I found The Fab Midwife, and her advice was golden, & after the first week or so it got so much easier, and I'm really glad I managed to keep at it.

HTH

Bramshott Thu 08-Nov-12 12:06:54

Do you change her nappy after she's fed on one side? When DD1 was just home (born at 33+4 and home at 36w ish) I used to feed on one side, then change her (which would usually wake her up, at least a bit), then offer the other side.

Good luck - you'll get there! That you have a large milk supply is fantastic. DD1 was in SCBU for almost 3 weeks and was tube fed EBM most of that time. She was only fully bf the last two days when I was back to room in with her.

PS And don't underestimate how fantastic it is that you've got a good supply! Expressing isn't easy for all women (I bloody hated it!!) & to have established a strong supply so early is great news.

bytheseaside Thu 08-Nov-12 12:18:57

Hey mincepie, i did actually have somemajor meltdowns (crying,not shouting!) until they let me room in as we were similarly at the 'bf and tube top-up ' stage rather than in the 'established bf' stage and nicu had similar policy to yours. possibly we were a few days on from you though, so don't give up! they let me have a few nights in to see if we made progress, luckily we did, else i'd have been sent home again so it was a big risk but it paid off for us and it was just a few more nights after that until we came home, so less than a week rooming in in total i think. i made the fuss about staying largely as i was devastated at having to go home at night and leave my baby, but also aware like you that it would be hard to establish bf without being there to feed at night ( mine also a good eve /night feeder, i think most are) so until they let me stay i went in lunchtime till early hours as there was 24 hs access for parents. it was really discouraged by nurses though, which drove me mad. i think it would be harder to switch your babys body clock, is it a possibility for you to shift your sleep / visiting hours to suit them? May only take a few days fingers crossed. pm me if you want, i know it is a really dreadful time x

Doraemon Thu 08-Nov-12 12:41:17

DS1 was born at 32 weeks - like bytheseaside I kicked off with the doctors after 2 1/12 weeks in SCBU - he was absolutely fine but still tube fed, and the rules were that you couldn't go home tube feeding, but they wouldn't take the tube out until bfing was fully established (on a totally ridiculous 4 hourly feeding schedule), but they wouldn't let me room in with the tube in (aaargh). So I had a huge strop, said I would book myself into the hotel opposite the hospital and come in at night to feed him. One of the nurses backed me up and the doctor agreed that we could try rooming in, leave his tube in in case we needed it (they didn't want to take it out then have to reinsert), and if his weight went up then we could take the tube out. We roomed in, loads of skin to skin, feeding far far more frequently than his supposed 'schedule', he put on loads of weight, the tube came out and we were home 2 days later.
I second the advice you've had about trying to keep her awake when feeding, and also call NCT or La Leche and speak to a professional - I would hope that SCBUs are a bit more enlightened about bfing than they were seven years ago but back then I felt I was having to fight an expectation that of course I wouldn't have enough milk for my baby (despite the huge stack of expressed milk in the fridge with his name on....). It is horrible when you desperately want to get your baby home, but I went on to feed DS1 for 3 years and it was so worth those first few weeks.

minipie Thu 08-Nov-12 13:06:26

thanks again. spoke to dr who just says give it time and be led by nurses hmm.

on she plus side they will let me stay here overnight and try b feeding each feed, tho not room in, so i may try that tomorrow night. thanks for tips on waking her up more.

they won't do cup feeds while i am there as its not meant to replace breast so that is not an option.

off to try her again....

sheeplikessleep Thu 08-Nov-12 13:50:38

Are they monitoring her jaundice levels?
If I were you, I'd demand to cup feed (it is not to replace breastfeeding, it is there as a temporary solution rather than bottlefeeding, in long term interest of breastfeeding).
It is so frustrating that there are some quite lax nurses and doctors out there.
I also suggest you post this in breastfeeding part of Mnet - Tiktok and others will have ideas I'm sure and really help you to get your daughter feeding.

Yy, good idea to repost/ask MNHQ to move to breastfeeding - tiktok is amazing & will give fabulous advice smile.

Good news they're letting you stay overnight - slightly odd on the cup feeding though, I agree - I think of that as a way to move babies from tube to bf rather than bottle, but I'm no expert.

Keep letting us know how you get on - even if it's just to offload.

<un-mn hugs>

bytheseaside Thu 08-Nov-12 14:54:46

We also did some (very messy) cup feeds too, suggested by nicu nurses, didn't take off for us , but clearly not considered a universally bad idea in nicus! With the benefit of a few weeks hindsight i would say if you want to do something that others have found helpful but nurses say no, ask what medical evidence there is for their decision, ask whether you have any say in the matter, and if it won't hurt your baby insist. remember that you are the mummy! A lovely nurse said this to me after id been a bit bullied by other nurses about being in nicu so late at night, made me really cry with gratefulness and was subsequently really empowering. great you can stay tonight, good luck!

Welovecouscous Thu 08-Nov-12 15:04:32

I agree with you are the mummy - remember you know best what dd needs and have the mothering instincts in her interests.

Would definitely recommend calling la leche league - bf counsellors are highly trained and will want to help you.

minipie Thu 08-Nov-12 15:19:03

to be fair to the nurses here they are lovely and supportive and will listen to me. the trouble is I dont have a clear view myself.

they will give her cup feeds at night but not when breast is available - ia that unusual? thing is im not sure how much cup feeding will help, if she isn't awake enough for bf then she isn't awake enough for a cup...

i am also worried about my bf technique even when she is awake - she will often latch on, take good sucks, but then sort of squirm an crunch up her body as if her tummy hurts, and bring herself off the breast in doing so. then obv she has to begin all over again with the latch which is exhausting... will post in the bf section as suggested.

thanks for the support and advice. x

EyeoftheStorm Thu 08-Nov-12 19:14:31

Just to say bottle feeding expressed milk doesn't mean the end of breastfeeding.

DS2 born at 30 weeks and had terrible trouble getting hang of it - also very sleepy baby. In the end I expressed and gave bottles as it was holding him back from being discharged.

I went to bed with him when we got home - lots of skin-to-skin, trying to breast feed, giving bottle to top up. Slowly but surely we got there. Dropped the bottles when he was taking more from me and went on to breastfeed for over a year.

I found that every nurse in the NICU had a different opinion on bottle/breast which made it difficult. I just put my head down and dealt with it when he was home.

Good luck.

Mandy21 Fri 09-Nov-12 12:23:59

Just wanted to post and say congrats, you're doing brilliantly! Its hard when you have lots of conflicting advice (both on here and from the medical staff) and you don't have a firm view of what is best. My 3 bits of advice would be to 1) speak to whoever is the most pro bf'ing at the unit / has most experience and get them to help you with the latching on process, will make such a difference. 2) see if you can be there whenever she seems to be the most alert / hungry. If you can have a good crack at feeding then, it might help at the times when she is tired. 3) change her nappy mid way through, tickle her feet and blow on her face to keep her awake / keep feeding.

I had twins at 27+6, also had a good supply. They had by EBM via a tube for a long time, gradually started putting them to the breast when they were having their feeds, then did mix of bf'ing and top ups. DD willingly had a cup in the night, DS didn't like it and had his tube feeds. Didn't seem to make any difference to how quick they got the hang of bf'ing.

I'd also suggest rooming in or at least being there for all the feeds if you can for a while - we tried twice, and fed on demand. The first time (I think they were about 35.5 weeks, so not that different to your DD), they weighed them before we went to room in, and then afterwards (I think we had 36 hours or so) and despite feeling like I fed them pretty much constantly, they'd both lost weight (about 60g each I think) so they went back on the unit for a few days. I was upset, but kind of confirmed that they weren't quite ready to come home. Tried again a few days later when they were just after 36 weeks and they both gained weight - albeit only 10g each!! They were home at 36+5 - at this stage, each day can make a real difference.

My consultant said the home environment is where they really get it / happy with the environment / you're there all the time. Its hard as you'll be desperate to get your baby home, but just wanted to say it'll come I'm sure - I was really impatient but had to take stock and realise how little they were and they just needed practice and time. Good luck!!

CelticPromise Sat 10-Nov-12 10:05:16

Hey minipie. Congratulations. Sounds like you are doing brilliantly.

Is there any BF support available at the hospital? I volunteer as a peer supporter on the local NNU. There are a couple of breastfeeding specialist nurses too. Could you ask for someone with specialist knowledge to come to see you? Maybe even someone from the postnatal ward? In my experience many NNU nurses are not all that knowledgeable about BF ing. A specialist nurse helped me hugely with DS and really improved my confidence.

minipie Mon 19-Nov-12 15:19:03

Just wanted to come back and update. DD is finally home at 37+2! Feeding still a little erratic, but good enough i hope.

I stayed overnight a few days ago (not rooming in but appearing for every feed) and it went v well, then 2 nights rooming in till she demonstrated weight gain and we could come home.

I did also try staying overnight about a week ago, after posting here. DD appeared to feed well but not enough wet nappies, so clearly hadn't really got it yet. That told menot to push it too fast and be patient.

if she falls asleep, sitting her upright to wind/wake her, and then feeding again, has really helped, as has keeping her cooler, and tickling etc. thanks for the suggestions.

hospital BF counsellor was useless though, just focused on positioning which i was fine on anyway. if anyone knows of a great private BF counsellor who covers SW London, ideally with preemie experience, please let me know!

Off to nap now before she wakes again...

Bramshott Tue 20-Nov-12 09:06:19

Great news minipie - glad she is home and its all going okay.

Jojoba1986 Tue 20-Nov-12 09:30:15

My DS wasn't prem but it still took him nearly a week to get the hang of breastfeeding! He lost too much weight so we had to go back into hospital. Like you, the positioning was fine, our problem just seemed to be that he didn't associate sucking with food. Less than 24 hours of expressing & bottle feeding & we had it sorted! We had to do top-up bottle feeds for a little while until he started gaining weight properly but we breastfed until 8 months! It was hard to fight for breastfeeding when everyone seemed to think we should just give up & bottle feed but we got there in the end! smile

Congrats on your little one! I hope things get sorted out & you can get on with just enjoying her really soon!

agendabender Tue 20-Nov-12 21:53:58

Wow I couldn't walk past this, it took me back two years. DS was a 33weeker, and stayed in without me for three and a half weeks. He struggled to stay awake to feed - a latch takes a lot of effort for them.

One nurse sent me to mothercare one day to buy nipple shields when I was in floods of tears because the hospital required him to feed for 15min several times a day before they would let him come home. She recommended the medela ones. They have a cut-out, which is supposedly for baby's nose, but if you turn them upside down then you and baby get proper contact. While shields can be a problem for some ladies, they mean that premmies have something that they can hold in their mouth with little effort. They can have little rests between suckles (which all babies do) without losing hold and having to put all that effort in again. the shield will fill up with milk between sucks and help them along.

This can get you home, but you will then have to wean baby off the shields. It actually took us a couple of months to get rid of them, but my supply remained HUGE and he grew fantastically. He still breastfeeds. He has not yet fed for more than 15min at a time.

You can do this. There are ways. Feel free to PM me if I can be of any support to you.

agendabender Tue 20-Nov-12 21:55:59

Sorry minipie I somehow missed your last post. Glad she's home. All the time you get together will really help with feeding. Best of luck!

Welovecouscous Tue 20-Nov-12 22:00:39

Yay mini grin glad you are both home.

I would contact your local LLL group - they will know who to contact in your area.

xx

Mandy21 Wed 21-Nov-12 13:10:11

Congrats Minipie on getting her home, fab news.

Agendabender's post reminded me that we also used nipple shields - but that was (in my case) down the "flat nipples" blush - the shields have a longer nipple which helps them (as I understand it) as the necessary mechanics for sucking are at the back of the mouth. I used them for about 4 weeks - from about the equivalent of 36 wks gestation to when they would have been term. Just stopped using them, didn't have to wean them off them or anything.

minipie Fri 23-Nov-12 15:28:39

Thanks again and thanks to agenda. DD is still quite sleepy at some feeds (though a wide awake and voracious feeder in the middle of the night - naturally!). During the day it is a real struggle to get her to wake up long enough for a decent feed. Any idea how long this sleepiness/reluctance will last...? I know the answer is likely to be the hospital mantra "every baby is different"!

AmandaCooper Fri 23-Nov-12 17:11:09

Hi minipie sorry to crash your thread but just wanted to say it's lovely to hear she is home. I'll update the WIITs! xx

minipie Fri 23-Nov-12 17:14:13

Thank you AC!

AmandaCooper Fri 23-Nov-12 17:20:58

Ooh hello shock <waves>

Willdoitinaminute Fri 23-Nov-12 17:30:50

My DS was born at 36 weeks ended up in Scbu being tube fed and had to have lot of lighT therapy for jaundice slept for nearly 10 days solid as he was exhausted thought I had perfect baby. Once he had cleared jaundice at around 9 days he started to liven up and feed more often and put on weight. Remember that she is prem and her tummy is very small and cannot take much quantity. Eating takes a lot of energy so little and often. Also how long does it take you to express 2-3 ounces probably under 5 mins. A bottle fed baby has just one hole to suck through your nipple has multiple ducts so breast fed baby's can drink much more in the same time.
Stick at it and relax instinct is often more successful than any amount of advice. Even if you think your question is stupid ask it the staff will not juDge you.
I had CS as well and post natal midwives were very defeatist but scbu midwives were amazingly supportive and we all had a mini celebration when he finally started to bf after 4 days of tube feeding.
I bf until he was nearly 2 and he is now a healthy 8 yr old.

bytheseaside Sat 24-Nov-12 11:48:43

Minipie that's brilliant! Good luck with bf , v.sleepy is normal for a while i think! i was advised that as long as your baby is putting weight on not every feed needs to.be a big one so the odd shorter one in the day is ok if they are guzzling at other times. Worth trying surestart breastfeeding groups / supporters, they are great and free, and may have some prem experience

minipie I've only just seen this!! We've missed you on the December thread. I'm being induced tomorrow at 35+3 so will be in a similar situation. Glad to read that you're home dd was prem and very sleepy too it can be really difficult smile

minipie Sat 24-Nov-12 13:46:52

Good luck Spotty... Hope your little one doesn't have to spend long in hospital x

Valdeeves Sun 25-Nov-12 03:49:16

I have two prem babies now - one at 35 weeks and one at 33.
The 35 weeker only ever fed through a nipple shield for prem babies. Medela (or name that sounds like that! They make the yellow breast pump - the swing one) sell them online and the ward might have a catalogue?
The other option is to get a double pump on hire to keep your milk supply high as you go along. You can cup feed it to them?

My advice is not to put yourself through two much stress if you really can't establish it and just express? My 35 weeker never fed well (boy) and feeding was very stressful for me - we did four months. My 33 weeker (girl) feeds alot better but still a bit hit and miss so I combine feed her. It's a lot less stressful to do both and I enjoy Breastfeeding her alot more.

Valdeeves Sun 25-Nov-12 03:49:54

Btw - good advice on this page

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now