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How soon after birth can you leave the hospital? Or can you discharge yourself??

(30 Posts)
Nikki2ol6 Sun 09-Oct-16 19:15:31

I ask this because my baby is unwell, he has major heart defects and he's being taken to another hospital very soon after birth. I really want to be with him and they said only if I'm discharged in time, but that was when they thought he would be staying in that hospital for a few hours now it's became apparent He will be going there within around 5-10minuets after birth so how soon will I be discharged if all goes well with my birth? Is there a certain amount of time you have to stay?

Orchidflower1 Sun 09-Oct-16 19:19:22

I know it's 6hrs for mum and baby providing "normal " delivery - maybe diff for you given circumstances - chat to you midwife/ cons. Best of luck for you both xx

RandomMess Sun 09-Oct-16 19:24:09

Baby is usually 6 hours but obviously your baby is just transferring.

You will have to wait for your placenta to be delivered (unless C-section) and you will need cleaning up, get dressed extra.

I self-discharged after DC2 - they weren't happy but they can't refuse! Speak to your midwife and ensure your birth plan includes that you want to be discharged as a matter of urgency so you can accompany your son, I'm sure they will do everything they can to make it happen but you also need to accept you may not be well enough.

Hugs & flowers

PikachuSayBoo Sun 09-Oct-16 19:26:58

You can discharge yourself, it's not a prison.

Just make it clear to the midwife looking after you in labour that you intend to leave as soon as physically possible whether or not discharge paperwork is done. Hopefully as you're having a shower/quick cup of tea she can get the paperwork done.

AveEldon Sun 09-Oct-16 19:27:50

Is it possible for you to deliver your baby at the hospital he is going to?

PikachuSayBoo Sun 09-Oct-16 19:29:54

Sorry, just reread. If he's going five mins after being born it's very unlikely you'll be ready. Your placenta will likely still be in situ.

But where I work we have to stabilise any baby that's born and then wait for the transfer team to arrive which is a special team that oversees all baby transfers. Not sure if that's the case everywhere but I cant imagine anywhere could sort out a transfer of a five min old baby?? Normally takes a coup,e of hours at least.

katiegg Sun 09-Oct-16 19:31:55

You can discharge yourself from hospital at any time, regardless of why you are there. You may need to sign an AMA though.

For a 'normal' delivery with no complications, most hospitals would be happy for you to go home after six hours.

crayfish Sun 09-Oct-16 19:35:21

I think it depends on the time of day a bit and the type of birth, although in theory you can discharge yourself whenever you want.

My DS was born late at night as was the baby of the woman next to me on the ward (about 11pm for her). She was desperate to get home but had a forceps birth and they wanted her checked properly which couldn't be done until the morning. She was pretty much begging to be let home from 7am but didn't get to leave until about 10am.

Artandco Sun 09-Oct-16 19:35:37

They can't keep you at all so you can go when ready.

As others said I doubt he would be rushed off in 5 mins as those ill usually need oxygen added and breathing stabilised and basic checks done first. How long this takes depends but I would guess 1-2 hrs at least.

Can you plan for your husband to go with baby and someone else like a friend or parent stay with you and transfer you after a few hours?

jellyandsoup Sun 09-Oct-16 19:38:03

Where are they transfering the baby too? Is there no way you could give birth there?

GinAndSonic Sun 09-Oct-16 19:41:59

My hospital 5years ago could do a 1hr discharge from the delivery suite.

Diamondsandpears Sun 09-Oct-16 19:49:31

Sorry to hear of your baby'seats problems. Has he arrived? Can you give birth at the hospital he'll be treated at if not?

Matilda1981 Sun 09-Oct-16 19:53:33

I was in and out of hospital within 3 hours of having my second - had to wait for me to have a wee!

ColdTeaAgain Sun 09-Oct-16 19:58:47

Surely best option is to have your baby at the hospital he needs to be at? This is usually the plan for patients in similar circumstances from our trust.

MakeLemonade Sun 09-Oct-16 20:10:42

Sorry to hear this, what a worrying time for you.

I had an ELCS and self-discharged after 24 hours as my DD was sick and had been transferred to another hospital. If the other hospital had a bed they would have transferred me too, I'm pretty sure that guidelines are to keep Mum and baby together wherever possible. Particularly given they know in advance this should be possible.

As other posters have said, delivering at the hospital with the required medical facilities would be first choice.

Nikki2ol6 Sun 09-Oct-16 20:23:12

They have told me he's to be transferred straight away and will be taken as soon as the cord has been cut but they are leaving the cord 2-3minuets to allow him extra oxygen but then he's to be take in an ambulance to a special heart hospital a few miles away. They have said only one of us can go in the ambulance so that will be my partner and I'm to follow when I'm discharged. But the thought of my 3minuet old baby being taken away is driving me insane, I'm almost 28 weeks and the whole thing is making me crazy. I have asked to give birth at the heart hospital but it can't happen they have said and they have said we can go on a visit to This hospital so I will know where my baby will be and such. But I can't imagine the state I will be in once he's been taken away

SolomanDaisy Sun 09-Oct-16 20:27:31

Does the heart hospital have a delivery suite? If it does I would be really questioning why you can't deliver there. It doesn't make sense not to.

Mummyme87 Sun 09-Oct-16 20:27:57

There is no official time. If you have a normal birth without an epidural and no complications afterwards, and you have no medical conditions that need monitored afterwards in hospital you can go as soon as you are ready. Give birth, deliver placenta, stitches if necessary, observations would need to be normal, pass a normal amount of urine.... you can leave. The 6hr thing you will hear is with regards to completing the newborn examination... it can't be completed until baby is 6hrs old as the heart can't be checked until then. You can be discharged before 6hrs in many hospitals now if appropriate and you come back for the baby check (obviously not appropriate for yourself)

Mummyme87 Sun 09-Oct-16 20:30:03

Lots of the major cardiac units don't have a maternity unit unfortunately, such as the royal brompton

NerrSnerr Sun 09-Oct-16 20:31:15

Unfortunately I don't think you can know until it happens. I had a planned c section but had quite a hefty bleed in recovery so wasn't in any state to get out of bed until 24 hours after birth but as others said a vaginal birth with no epidural and no complications you could be up and about really quickly.

AWhistlingWoman Sun 09-Oct-16 20:34:08

My twins were very premature and transferred quickly after birth as the hospital I delivered in did not have a level 3 NICU. After I had delivered the placenta I discharged myself (was told this was against advice but they understood why) as I wanted to follow them. I felt in good health and I just couldn't have stayed where I gave birth knowing that they were miles away and sick. Husband drove us down and we were with them again a few hours later.
Hope it all goes well and that you can get to your baby as quickly as possible.

eurochick Sun 09-Oct-16 20:46:42

I knew my baby would be whisked off to nicu (albeit in the same hospital) and I stressed a lot about the separation in pregnancy. When it came to it, I was so out of it (I had a rough few hours post section) that it didn't matter as much as I thought it would. I was wheeled down the next morning and saw her about ten hours after she was delivered. She was in an incubator so I couldn't do much anyway - I couldn't hold her or anything until a while later when she was more stable. Those few hours might seem less important when the time comes, particularly as your baby will probably be surrounded by medics pre and post transfer so you wouldn't be able to hold him/her or whatever. We were separated again when she was moved to another hospital after a day and a half and I hadn't been discharged (they approved my early discharge so I could follow her). I guess I'm trying to say that separation isn't anyone's ideal start but when you get to it you might not find it as bad as you imagine. Big hugs. X

Superdinocharge Sun 09-Oct-16 20:51:01

Are you having a caesarian or vaginal birth? If a normal vaginal birth with no epidural etc you can get up as soon as the placenta is delivered and go. Otherwise at least 24 hours with a c section.

Nikki2ol6 Mon 10-Oct-16 09:42:50

I hope to be having vaginal they have told me his his will only be effected once he try's to breath and not before so he should handle a labour and birth just like any other baby. I'm going to hold off an epidural as I want to be up and about straight away and out the door with him. I know I won't be able to go instantly but I'm hoping an hour or so and I know once I get there I still won't be able to hold him as he's going to be on a lot of machines and in an incubator but right now I can't bare the throughly of not being with him but maybe once the time comes I'll be ok with it and think well ok I need to rest for a few hours and get better have some food and such and take care of myself before leaving but I really don't know

Artandco Mon 10-Oct-16 09:46:52

What I recommend you take if you plan to leave asap is a warm long cardigan and some sugary drink and food. After both births I couldn't stop shaking as blood sugar dropped and was frozen. So at least if you feel ok to go after a few hours you can wrap up and eat or drink something on way over

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