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11 weeks (ish) and craving a glass of wine

(147 Posts)
LittleMrsExpecting Sat 16-Feb-13 17:55:17

Hi everyone, I am 11-12 weeks pregnant and although normally am not a big drinker am dying for a glass of wine. Have people been having the odd glass or abstaining from wine full stop? x

lucybrad Sat 16-Feb-13 21:39:07

still waiting for that evidence.

sw11mumofone Sat 16-Feb-13 21:41:07

Yes i'd also like to see the evidence regarding the baby who got FAS from one glass of wine!!!!!

ExpatAl Sat 16-Feb-13 21:56:34

I am at home so can't access documents that are on my work desktop but a quick google will tell you that alcohol passes straight across the placenta and straight into babies bloodstream and that some genenotypes are way more susceptible/vulnerable. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15957670

My mum had the odd drink and so did my sisters while pregnant and we are one big perfect genius family so I could probably risk it and did drink a few beers in my last pregnancy. However with what I've read since there's no way I would and definitely wouldn't while the brain is forming during these weeks in the first trimester. There is now some evidence to suggest that drinking in the last trimester when the baby is doing the last of its brain development is dangerous.

ExpatAl Sat 16-Feb-13 21:58:21

I would also add that I was sceptical that the odd drink could be harmful until very recently.

ExpatAl Sat 16-Feb-13 22:04:13

Anyway, to return to my original point if having the odd drink hasn't been harmful to your baby you shouldn't extrapolate that to all pregnancies because you know nothing about the mother who is posting.

jaffacake2 Sat 16-Feb-13 22:05:00

Government guidelines are to abstain from alcohol throughout pregnancy with particular emphasis on first trimester. Maximum after that would be 1-2 units per week with 1 unit being 125mls of wine.
Ongoing research is on the FASD website .
People used to dismiss the idea that smoking was bad for your health with quotes of "my grandad smoked 60 a day and was never ill " etc
Now smoking is fully recognised as dangerous.
I wonder what people will say in 10yrs time about drinking in pregnancy ?
I cant see why people would take the risk just for a drink.

yousankmybattleship Sat 16-Feb-13 22:08:50

Why would you take the risk? Surely its not that hard to go without alcohol.

lucybrad Sat 16-Feb-13 22:10:50

goodness the french must be a race full of FAS

stacey212528 Sat 16-Feb-13 22:11:18

How many woman do you know that know they are pregnant as soon as sperm meets egg? Many drink alcohol without knowing they are pregnant. My mother wasn't aware she was pregnant until she was 22 weeks and so didn't alter her lifestyle. I have now graduated university and have a good job...

I personally don't want to drink while I'm pregnant, but don't think you can throw about "facts" just because you don't agree with it.

lucybrad Sat 16-Feb-13 22:16:42

driving is dangerous in pregnancy - maybe we should abstain from that too?

yousankmybattleship Sat 16-Feb-13 22:19:18

How is driving dangerous in pregnancy?

Angelico Sat 16-Feb-13 22:20:51

I'm assuming lucy's point is that driving is a relatively dangerous activity full stop but that we don't say stop driving just because we're pregnant. Have to say I worried more about my long commute along terrible roads when pregnant than I ever did about having a glass of wine!

Angelico Sat 16-Feb-13 22:23:26

And expat thanks for link but from first glance seems to be based on people with asian ancestry who maybe genetically have a lower alcohol tolerance generally? Will have a read. I know Japanese friends at college got absolutely legless on a glass of wine. If you have other documents would love to read them as we will probably be trying for another baby fairly soon and would be good to now if there is new info! smile

Angelico Sat 16-Feb-13 22:24:24

Know - not 'now'. That makes it sound like I'm demanding info or something!!!

jaffacake2 Sat 16-Feb-13 22:25:04

From FASD trust website UK quote;

"But FASD only affects children born to alcoholics. Small amounts are okay."

Research shows that binges and constant low level exposure is also potentially harmful. When you drink, so does your baby. It takes approximately one hour for your body to process each unit of alcohol; it takes 3 times as long for the alcohol to pass round the system of the baby in the womb.

Flisspaps Sat 16-Feb-13 22:26:10

One glass is not a binge, nor is it constant low level exposure

yousankmybattleship Sat 16-Feb-13 22:26:29

Such a silly argument. Driving is not inherently dangerous. Of course there are risks associated with driving, as there are with crossing the road or travelling by train but those are risks that everyone has to take as part of leading their every day life. Drinking alcohol is a completely unecessary and selfish act and surely if there is any risk involved surely you simply don't do it.

sw11mumofone Sat 16-Feb-13 22:29:10

Smoking has been proved to be bad for your health. Light to moderate drinking has not been proven to cause FAS. People here have suggested using google to find links to info regarding alcohol crossing the placenta etc. But if you google you can also find studies with findings that suggest in some people light and moderate drinking in pregnancy have been linked to having 2 year olds with a much broader and sophisticated vocabulary. So - nobody has all the answers and everyone should be left to make up their own minds. Its all very well being sanctimonious and wondering why anyone would even risk one drink. But everyone is different and in some cases a glass of wine a day is preferable to the damage that could be caused by the stress they are under. And that advice came from a GP.
So while anyone with half a brain would know that a bottle of vodka a day is bound to have adverse effects, light to moderate drinking has never been proven to cause damage. So all those of you who havent touched a drop thats good for you but comments like "why would anyone even risk one drink" are patronising and unhelpful.

jaffacake2 Sat 16-Feb-13 22:31:30

If 1 glass 125mls is 1 unit which is the recommended ammount, if you must drink, per week,then the odd glass surely would be over the limit fairly quickly.
Lots of wine glasses are 225ml size.

Flisspaps Sat 16-Feb-13 22:31:52

Ah, now 2yo DD has a 'broad and sophisticated' vocabulary grin

I would say that if their is any even remote possibility it could be harmful why risk it. After all people metabolize alcohol differently. And depending on weight fluctuations, tiredness, stress how much you have eaten or drunk etc the same amount of alcohol could affect you more or less.

sw11mumofone Sat 16-Feb-13 22:38:34

Haha flisspaps!! I drank lightly/ moderately in my first pregnancy and my 2 yo DD would be scary if she was any brighter!!!!

Angelico Sat 16-Feb-13 22:41:45

battleship I don't agree. Statistically my baby was at more risk from me driving an 80 mile round trip along rural roads everyday than she was from me having one glass of wine every week.

Anyway OP so as not to lose any more minutes of my life I would say: you are a grown up. Make your own decision and stand by the consequences, And if you do decide to have a glass of wine for god's sake enjoy it and don't lie awake tonight agonising over it! smile And good luck with your pregnancy x

yousankmybattleship Sat 16-Feb-13 22:45:59

Angelico I don't think I explained myself well. I meant that you cannot eliminate risk from your life when pregnant, but you can make sure you don't take uneccesary risks You may have to drive, but you don't have to drink.

Flisspaps Sat 16-Feb-13 22:49:17

You may have to drive, but I bet you'll still make unnecessary journeys by car as well as essential ones (I don't drive)

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