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Would you like your baby to be five times safer....

(93 Posts)
lagoonhaze Tue 01-May-12 22:22:39

in the car?

If so then check out extended rearfacing car seats.

When I had my DS i went down the traditional route of infant carrier and forward facing at around 9mths. I was blissfully unaware of the risks that forward facing seats could pose to a young child body.

I started to see posts on mumsnet about extended rear facing (ERF) and it sparked me to do further research.

From www.carseat.se

Children who sit rear facing in a car seat cut the risk for death or injury dramatically. But why is rear facing so much better and where did the idea come from?

There are three main reasons why rear facing is so much better. First one is the outstanding protection of a child’s head, neck and spine in frontal collision which is roughly 80% of accidents. Second is superior protection in side collisions. A rear facing child is pushed further into the car seat where it’s well protected. Third is a social reason, rear facing car seats often work better since driver/passenger can more easily communicated with the child

From before my DD was even conceived I knew she would be extended rearfacing and I set to work about slowly convincing my DP. I expected a struggle as this baby was his 3rd and my 2nd and all the other DCs were turned round like other around the year mark.

He looked at the research, videos and said yes knowing what I know now I, happy for us to ERF best start saving up for the seat!

Im pleased he has come to this conclusion with me as its something I feel very passionate about. However when I mention it to friends they look at me like I have two heads!

So if you want to check it out for yourself here are some good sites.

www.rearfacing.co.uk

This is their facebook site which can answer any questions

www.facebook.com/groups/209783279077720/357870094269037/?notif_t=group_activity#!/RearFacingTheWayForward

Another fab site is

www.carseat.se/

There are loads of seats becoming available due to consumer demand. This along with an expected law change in early 2013 to keep all babies rearfacing til 14 mths means hopefully they will become the norm.

bishboschone Mon 07-May-12 18:34:54

Can someone explain to me where the child's legs go in these seats please?

PestoPenguin Mon 07-May-12 18:59:36

bishboschone -with the seats we've had (3 different ones and yet another for grandparents car) there is a gap between the part of the child seat where their bottom goes and the back of the rear seat of the car. Their feet sit perfectly comfortably there smile. I think there are some images in this clip, which is not the one I was trying to find earlier and still can't find hmm

PestoPenguin Mon 07-May-12 19:01:36

The clip I was looking for is on the rearfacing.co.uk homepage. D'oh!

They also have a gallery of pictures smile

bronze Mon 07-May-12 19:11:13

I understand that's rear facing is safer so why when trying to prove that point do they show forward facing seat that are so appallingly fitted. It makes their good argument look poorer

bishboschone Mon 07-May-12 19:12:11

I see , they are further forward. Can anyone recommend one for when ds grows out of his cabriofix .. Would like isofix if possible .thank you .

PestoPenguin Mon 07-May-12 19:19:09

bishbosch What sort of car do you have? Do you have under floor storage boxes (lots of people carriers do)? That can really restrict your isofix xhoices as nearly all use a support leg.

bronze Did you watch the crash test videos? They're not badly fitted, the forces are just so great that's what actual ff seats do in crashes.

bishboschone Mon 07-May-12 19:20:58

An Audi a2

bronze Mon 07-May-12 19:22:57

I watched and also watched a few other forward facing crash tests and though the child had bad forces on them the seats didn't move that dramatically. As I said I know that rear facing is safer, I'm not defending anything just saying they don't help their own argument

bishboschone Mon 07-May-12 19:24:24

I just looked at videos . They are big old things aren't they. I have a bad back and was looking forward to him being forward facing but I have watched the video And I get that they are a lot safer .

nancerama Mon 07-May-12 19:32:11

I see further up thread a couple of posters asked about when to upgrade from infant carriers.

The Maxi Cosi Cabriofix is suitable up to 13kg, or until your babies head hangs over the top. Many parents upgrade as soon as the feet are approaching the front of the seat, but there really isn't any need.

I have a Mini (our only car), and I'm not sure how possible it will be to move to EFR, but I do know that I can keep DS in his cabriofix for a long time yet.

PestoPenguin Mon 07-May-12 19:32:26

Well, out of the 4 seats I've had personal experience of the ones I've liked best were the klippan kiss and BeSafe Izikid (not the combi that is reversible, the kid -not sure if it's available in the UK, we imported it from www.carseat.se). The Kiss is more compact. When we got it it was one of only three seats that had passed the most stringent Swedish safety tests, but I now can't find that info. It was v v easy to fit. The Izikid we had was an earlier model than the current one and before they made the isofix version. Fitting it with the belt was a bit of a palaver, but I imagine isofix would be much easier. Our other seat was an older Britax one not sold any more. The grandparents one is a two way elite, which lots of people love because it fits so many cars and is so versatile. It's not isofix and I'm always a little concerned that it seems to have less side impact protection than the others.

To be honest, all the rf seats are so much safer than the ff seats that as long as you choose one that fits your particular car, it is likely to be good.

DanceToTheIslandBeat Mon 07-May-12 19:32:42

If you need advice on which erf seat would best suit you/your car, the in car safety centre in mk are brilliant, really helpful.

PestoPenguin Mon 07-May-12 19:34:42

bishbosch -yes they are big and heavy to fit. But, once fitted no need to move them, they just stay in the car. They are generally high up, so no more bending needed than a ff group 1 I'd say. The kids get a great view out of the windows smile.

ZenNudist Mon 07-May-12 19:36:33

Good idea to post this in pregnancy section. Raise awareness as early as possible. Lots of my friends bought a family fix base by maxi cosi which meant they could upgrade from rf to ff. They were not happy when they realised they'd made a costly mistake, most just stuck with buying the ff one they'd been sold on before birth.

It's very annoying that you can't buy rf at prime highstreet outlets, halfords mothercare etc. Also annoying that these outlets spread anti- rf messages about poorly fitting seats. We used the in car safety centre in Milton Keynes. They had online videos of how to fit seats. Don't know about anyone else but we have to take the seat out of dh's car from time to time & need to refit the seat safely ourselves. Ours is really easy to do though. It's a britax 2-way elite.

RandomMess Mon 07-May-12 19:39:14

bump

PestoPenguin Mon 07-May-12 19:41:16

Some John Lewis branches do sell the Recaro Polaric (which is isofix, but we found quite upright when we tried it in our previous car) and also the Izicombo.

I agree it is a great shame they are not more widely known about and visible in high street retailers in the UK.

lagoonhaze Mon 07-May-12 19:51:01

Zennudist Yep thats the very reason I posted it in pregnancy. The family fix kind of ties you in to going forward facing and often pregnant people havent considered rearfacing.

If everyone on this thread on favour of ERF could join the facebook page

www.facebook.com/groups/209783279077720/357870094269037/?notif_t=group_activity#!/RearFacingTheWayForward

and share on their wall then pregnant friends/new parents could become more aware. Its mumsnet that made me more aware and that group. My DD will be in a TWE as we have storage boxes in one car.

bishboschone Have a good look at the different seats. You may actually find it easier on your back as you are squeezing and twisting to get into the door opening gap.

lagoonhaze Mon 07-May-12 19:58:39

pestopenguin ItsmylastoneDid you have people look at you like you had two heads when you went ERF? My friends think Im mad! Im pass caring though!

Duellingfango I agree cost can be a factor but the one Im getting is £200 and many chidlren outgrown their 9mth-4yrs before 4yrs and end up buying another seat so all in all I dont think its too bad. If more people targeted the manufactuers then price would come down.

lagoonhaze Mon 07-May-12 20:01:19
PestoPenguin Mon 07-May-12 20:01:24

People generally look at me like I have two heads, so I'm not sure I'd notice tbh grin

lagoonhaze Mon 07-May-12 20:12:27

I just saw your comment about a sling on another thread. I can imagine. (Strokes wrap) People are looking at me the same way and I havent even got my seat yet! Love it!

PestoPenguin Mon 07-May-12 20:15:02

With me these days I think it's more to do with the 3 kids under 8 and being v pregnant, LOL.

lagoonhaze Mon 07-May-12 21:09:26

pesto grin and congratulations!

ItsMyLastOne Mon 07-May-12 21:58:40

No one has thought it strange tbh, but probably because we started talking about to friends and family before even needing an ERF. There are no parents we know now, I don't think, who haven't had the ERF spiel! wink Strangers in car parks or driving behind might question it but I don't notice!

In terms of legs, even if you get one which touches, or pretty much touches the seat of the car it's absolutely fine. If you think about it logically, a child in an ERF seat can cross their legs, rest them against the seat of the car, bend them etc, but in a FF seat they just hang. With hanging legs they are more likely to get reduced circulation in their legs due to the pressure. So really, even with seeming as though they have no space, they're actually better off.

The Besafe izi combi and klippan kiss both have no leg so are suitable for more cars. The klippan kiss is isofix and the besafe izi combi is available as isofix or non-isofix.

I know many people have an issue with the price, but many people spend £100-150 on a FF seat, and an ERF is £200-300. If something awful happened to your child in an accident and they were left injured, permanently disabled or worse <shudder> would you still be glad you saved £100-150 by buying a FF seat when an ERF could have protected your child's future??????

If anyone is in or near Birmingham, I know a place which often has ex display seats from the in car safety centre in Milton Keynes. Just pm me and I'll send you the info. Last time I was there they had a few Besafe Izi Combis, they've had Britax Hiways. A few different types.

PestoPenguin Mon 07-May-12 22:12:57

I have a klippan kiss and it definitely does have a support leg.

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