MNHQ Group 2

(60 Posts)
AnnMumsnet (MNHQ) Fri 26-Jul-13 15:02:39

Many thanks for agreeing to take part in this closed discussion thread. As you'll know, you all have an individual user name, separate to your on-site profile. So please feel free to be as open and frank as you like, without your views being read-across to your site profile.

The aim of these discussions is to discover if, how and why women's voting intentions are shifting and what you think about each of the party leaders.

We'll ask a few questions, allow you to think them over, respond, engage in a bit of discussion with other participants, and then we will pop back on the thread. We might want to tease out the reasons behind particular views or opinions and then will crack on with the next set of questions (on Thursday) and one more set over the weekend. Do feel free to re visit the thread at any point over the next week or so. We'll email you when we add a new set of questions.

Here are the questions to get you started

Thinking about when you decide which party to vote for, how important is the leader of the party in that decision?

Why?

What do you look for in a party leader? What makes a good party leader and what makes a bad one? What makes a good prime minister and what makes a bad one?

Thinking about the party you voted for at the 2010 General Election and the party you would vote for now, has it changed?

Why?
Why not?

Feel free to include any thoughts you might have - they don't have to be the conventional, just true to how you feel!

delegate207 Tue 30-Jul-13 13:08:04

I think it's critical to have a leader who can 'gel' his/her party behind them. I do look at who the leader is of the party I vote for, I'm very much a Labour supporter but not too left wing, I would struggle to support a leader who didn't share my core beliefs.
A good party leader should listen to his party and the people at large. They need to be able to take tough decisions for the long term good of the country, but need to be able to properally account for their actions and give solid facts to back policy up.
All too often party leaders (especially those who become prime minister) start off with good intentions but fail the people who elected them. To me a bad leader is someone who doesn't follow through on their promises, or at least try! Although I'm not a Margaret Thatcher supporter! She was an amazing PM during the Falklands War, I lived near an army town at the time. She unified the country at a time when soldiers were going half way around the world to fight for a piece of land we'd never heard of, but it was the right thing to do. Sadly, she got carried away with the power and stopped listening to her party and the country.
My allegiance hasn't changed since the election, I don't feel any empathy with David Cameron, or my local MP. I live in an area that is very Tory and will never be anything else,

delegate213 Tue 30-Jul-13 13:14:01

I think the party leader is an essential part of the 'party package' as I expect his values and ambitions to influence the party manifesto and promises and also whether they will be delivered.
A good party leader makes his background invisible and irrelevant: being wealthy and priveledged shouldn't be a barrier but , for example, David Cameron appears not to have any understanding of life beyond this. George Osborne appears not to have ever set foot outside of his estate and this comes across in how he seems to make assumptions about income that jar with the Marion's experiences.
I voted lib dem as I had no faith in the others; I feel betrayed by the tuition fees debacle and I can't see a viable alternative at the moment.

delegate203 Tue 30-Jul-13 13:34:46

Thinking about when you decide which party to vote for, how important is the leader of the party in that decision?

The party leader is crucial. I had no faith in Tony Blair and moved over from being a life long Labour supporter during his time in office, to being a LibDem voter. This was because he seemed to me to be a Tory in Labour clothing, and I felt that a lot of people were being misdirected as a result of this shift to the Right by the Labour Party. Now I look at the Millibands and although I don't think they are particularly personable or media friendly, I do think they both have a solid grounding in socialist values. Shame about the family infighting, but I'd rather have ed Milliband leading the country that Cameron.

Why?
Because the leader shapes the party. How the leader is perceived and how she or he approaches the job directs how others respond.

What do you look for in a party leader? What makes a good party leader and what makes a bad one? What makes a good prime minister and what makes a bad one?

I'd love a leader who closed their ears to spin doctoring and saw through policies designed to improve the state of the country long term instead of endlessly fiddling and mucking about with minor details aimed at spiking their popularity in opinion polls.

A good leader is not swayed by meeja hysteria and polls and short term sticking plasters. A good/great leader doesn't shuffle the cabinet according to cronyism, but gathers the most experienced people together, sorts out long and short term objectives and systematically sees them through. Businesses do it. I wonder if the government realises how very much the people think The Thick of It is an accurate portrayal of how their days in office are spent.

Thinking about the party you voted for at the 2010 General Election and the party you would vote for now, has it changed?

Perhaps. Last time I voted LibDem, partly because local LibDems are brilliant, partly because I live in a Tory area which occasionally gets ousted by Lib Dems whereas Labour had no chance, and partly because I was deeply disaffected by the Labour Party. But next time round, I think I'd vote Labour.

Why?

Because I am getting more radicalised as this country gets greedier and the gap between rich and poor gets bigger. No one would know this to look at me. Big house in smart area, kids in private schools but I loathe the Tories. I loathe above all else the idolisation of profit over service. Serco, G4S - hoodlum companies running our services into the ground for a quick buck. And I'm increasingly shocked by how passive we Brits have become about it. How accepting we are. Everyone i know who is employed is doing the job of two or three people. Everyone I know who is unemployed is educated, able and willing to work, yet there is nothing around.

Not long ago my husband went for drinks with a dozen friends. Around the table at this pub in an extremely well heeled corner of SE England only one man was now employed full time. The rest were mainly between contracts, on short term contracts or using redundancy to try to set up new businesses in a very competitive market. There was no job security, no job satisfaction, no hope of career progress or ability to plan for or save for the future. For eleven out of twelve well-educated men.

I'm not baying for a revolution, but I do think we need some really forthright, fair genuinely socialist leaders at the helm. They'd win respect.

And, of course, because there's been no sign of Lib Dem showing their colours during this coalition. They've hardly tempered the way the Tories behave.

Why not?

Feel free to include any thoughts you might have - they don't have to be the conventional, just true to how you feel!

delegate208 Tue 30-Jul-13 13:55:09

Thinking about when you decide which party to vote for, how important is the leader of the party in that decision?

Rather than positively influencing me, an unappealing/incompetent leader could put me off voting at all. I generally have a feeling about which party I support and as long as the leader is capable, i will vote for them. If I want to vote for a party but the leader is an embarrassment, I will vote tactically for a different party.

Why?

Because a leader is not the decision maker, but the figurehead. The party's politics are the most important thing. The party will have more success in driving them forward if the leader is effective.

What do you look for in a party leader? What makes a good party leader and what makes a bad one? What makes a good prime minister and what makes a bad one?

I look for (and rarely find) charisma, humanity, intelligence, evidence of grass-roots-experience. A good leader is like a good manager - genuine, convincing, carries team with him, enthusiastic, generally upbeat.
A bad party leader is boorish, bigoted, old-fashioned, old-school, invisible.
A good prime minister has to have gravitas when engaging with other countries' heads of state, as well as the qualities of a good leader.

Thinking about the party you voted for at the 2010 General Election and the party you would vote for now, has it changed?

No

Why?

because I'll always vote labour, or at least, i'll always find it impossible to vote tory, and pointless to vote libdem.

Why not?

delegate218 Tue 30-Jul-13 14:38:24

I voted labour in 2010 but might find it harder to do so now, almost entirely because of their leader. I find it utterly frustrating that since the 2010 election huge changes have gone through such as cuts to the NHS, tuition fees, housing benefit cuts, universal credit etc that nobody voted for. And Ed Miliband just stands by and says nothing. It seems Labour's strategy is just to sit this period of opposition out and not even to bother fighting until we're in an election period. I find it utterly irresponsible and complacent. They have a responsibility as Her Majesty's Opposition to put the other side of the argument but too often don't bother, meaning the Coalition are often defining the terms of the debate and therefore winning the argument.
I have thought of joining Labour and would like to but specifically don't want to while EM is in charge as I don't want to become a membership statistic that appears to endorse his leadership! Silly really, but I dislike him that much. He comes from an out of touch elite. Every sound bite is so incrediy over thought by a team of policy wonks, everything he says feels like it's been hashed over by a committee and coming up with bollocks terms like 'predistribution' is frankly a waste of everyone's time and will make no sense to the average voter. Instead he should be getting out there doing all the running on issues like the NHS. And I don't understand why he's been so quiet about corporate tax avoidance. That's a huge issue that Amazon, Starbucks etc arent doing their bit and he should be right behind Margaret Hodge talking about it at every available opportunity, organising boycotts etc. Instead he gives the impression of sitting in a room all day with ten Ollie Reeders agonising over a full stop.
In truth, I would probably vote Labour next time -- because I believe in the core value of redistribution of wealth and the welfare stare -- but deeply, deeply grudgingly. I might actually vote Green, I need to look into it. But I find EM utterly passionless, condescending and out of touch.

delegate215 Tue 30-Jul-13 14:39:09

The leader of the party is important as I would expect that person to personify that party's values. For most people, who don't have a specific political interest, the leader is what they'll make their judgement on. The popularity of the Lib Dem's at the last General Election was partly to do with how Nick Clegg came accross.

A good party leader will firstly be doing it for the right reasons and for the good of the party, there are too many men vying for position and power rather than because they genuinely feel they can do a good job. I can't help thinking that if the Millibands worked together to decide which one of them stood and the other supported and worked with him, the Labour Party would be in a much better position.

A good prime minister would work to support this country and our society in the best way, not just use their position to promote their own political ideals. They would listen and reflect and be open to change when things go wrong. I'm also a great believer in evidence based practice. At times, there is no other option but to take a punt but this Government seems particularly fond of looking at evidence of what works, and then doing something entirely different.

I voted Labour at the last general election and I will do again. The Tory's seem to have replaced the word society with economy. We used to do things that were best for society, now everything we do is for the economy. Who is this economy for? It's very difficult to get behind saving an economy designed to make the rich richer and the poor poorer. There is no incentive for me there.

Nick Clegg made a terrible mistake jumping into bed with Cameron and Co. With Labours apathetic challenge lacking in policy and vigour, there would be a real chance of Lib Dem's taking my vote from Labour. Not now though, not ever.

I live in the North East and still see the evidence of the damage the last Tory government made. I'm working class and believe in a fair society for all so my allegiance is with Labour. I wish they'd get their finger out though and start making a legitimate challenge to the Coalition.

delegate223 Tue 30-Jul-13 15:28:09

Thinking about when you decide which party to vote for, how important is the leader of the party in that decision?

Extremely important.

Why?

They are the face and reprsent the whole party, a lot of my feeling for a party depends on the leader.

What do you look for in a party leader? What makes a good party leader and what makes a bad one? What makes a good prime minister and what makes a bad one?

I look for someone who isn't a complete git (relatively hard) A good party leader is someone who is fair and can be taken seriously, but isn't too flippant. He should appeal to all and not be too upper class. A bad party leader would be somebody who only seemed to look out for one class or type of person and someone who you couldn't relate to.

Thinking about the party you voted for at the 2010 General Election and the party you would vote for now, has it changed?

I voted Labour. And will vote Labour next time.

Why?

I usually do. Why not?

I am a miner's daughter, so couldn't bring myself to vote Tory. the Liberals are in bed with the Tories and are beyond weak. UKIP are a joke (BNP lite) and the other parties are too small to succeed.

delegate214 Tue 30-Jul-13 16:57:18

I find the leader important, although as other posts have said, this is perhaps more in an I can't bear to vote for this person way than in a positive way.For example, I believe that the Libdems most strongly match my political beliefs, but have no respect for Nick Clegg as I feel he dropped his beliefs to pursue power.

I want a leader who is charismatic, empathetic, can make a tough decision without gloating and enjoying other's difficulties, who has gained experience in the real world (successfully within their own right) and who represents the country in a way that we can be proud of.

I voted libdem at the last election, but won't if Nick Clegg remains leader. If Vince Cable was Libdem leader I'd vote for them. Otherwise it'll be labour, although I think Ed Milliband lacks the charisma and real world experience that he needs.

I wouldn't vote Tory, they have screwed me and my children over with their decisions on public spending and welfare.

delegate217 Tue 30-Jul-13 17:00:14

Many thanks for agreeing to take part in this closed discussion thread. As you'll know, you all have an individual user name, separate to your on-site profile. So please feel free to be as open and frank as you like, without your views being read-across to your site profile.

The aim of these discussions is to discover if, how and why women's voting intentions are shifting and what you think about each of the party leaders.

We'll ask a few questions, allow you to think them over, respond, engage in a bit of discussion with other participants, and then we will pop back on the thread. We might want to tease out the reasons behind particular views or opinions and then will crack on with the next set of questions (on Thursday) and one more set over the weekend. Do feel free to re visit the thread at any point over the next week or so. We'll email you when we add a new set of questions.

Here are the questions to get you started

Thinking about when you decide which party to vote for, how important is the leader of the party in that decision?

Why?

What do you look for in a party leader? What makes a good party leader and what makes a bad one? What makes a good prime minister and what makes a bad one?

Thinking about the party you voted for at the 2010 General Election and the party you would vote for now, has it changed?

I voted Labour and I would again. I don't always agree with everything they do but they are 100 times better than the Tories and the only ones likely to get rid

delegate217 Tue 30-Jul-13 17:12:33

Please ignore last post- I posted far too soon!

I think a good leader needs to have charisma, a personality and be a strong person with the backing of their party. However, this still would not make me change my core beliefs about the party I was voting for.

A good pm should I feel have lived some kind of normal life, had hardships, done things. But I realise this is very unlikely to happen. I think just having Pms and leaders who have only ever seen Eton/Cambridge/house of parliament is very dangerous. A bad pm is unable to have any view on things they've not experienced. Like the current one.

I voted labour in 2010 and I will do again. They don't do everything right but they area by times better than the Tories and have the best chance is getting rid of them.

delegate214 Tue 30-Jul-13 17:13:58

I find the leader important, although as other posts have said, this is perhaps more in an I can't bear to vote for this person way than in a positive way.For example, I believe that the Libdems most strongly match my political beliefs, but have no respect for Nick Clegg as I feel he dropped his beliefs to pursue power.

I want a leader who is charismatic, empathetic, can make a tough decision without gloating and enjoying other's difficulties, who has gained experience in the real world (successfully within their own right) and who represents the country in a way that we can be proud of.

I voted libdem at the last election, but won't if Nick Clegg remains leader. If Vince Cable was Libdem leader I'd vote for them. Otherwise it'll be labour, although I think Ed Milliband lacks the charisma and real world experience that he needs.

I wouldn't vote Tory, they have screwed me and my children over with their decisions on public spending and welfare.

delegate206 Tue 30-Jul-13 19:48:08

Thinking about when you decide which party to vote for, how important is the leader of the party in that decision?

So long as the leader is breathing then it doesn't bother me too much, the policies are set out by other people not solely by the leader.

What do you look for in a party leader? What makes a good party leader and what makes a bad one? What makes a good prime minister and what makes a bad one?

Like all managers, a good one is capable, conscientious, able to listen and able to empathise. I'd also like it if they have managed to hold down a real job (not working for Daddy) and understand what the people they represent are going through. A bad prime Minister is what we have now, he has spent a lifetime insulated from the hoi polloi by his families wealth and power. So we are stuck with Lizard man and his side kick Odious Osbourne who have never got down to their last million and have no idea how real people have to live. I also feel that having a PM that is too chummy with the leaders of service companies is not a good thing, leading to the debacle of services provided by G4S, Serco et al. It makes me think that someone, somewhere is getting kick backs for awarding these companies contracts whilst shareholders reap the rewards and employees suffer.

Thinking about the party you voted for at the 2010 General Election and the party you would vote for now, has it changed?

I voted labour in 2010 but our Labour MP was ousted because the election boundaries were changed to add 2 Tory villages to the City and take a Labour small Town off the City and add it to a completely Tory constituency.

I'd vote Labour again if we were still living here purely because I could never bring myself to vote Tory.

delegate220 Tue 30-Jul-13 19:57:34

An unappealing leader would put me off voting. A good leader would be the 'icing on the cake', but the leader is not as important as the policies - I could not vote for a Tory 'good leader' IYSWIM, as I find the politics abhorrent. A good party leader has support from his/her party - no 'in-fighting'. They understand 'real world/Britain' problems, and are not afraid to admit they do not have a magic wand! David Cameron is the epitome of a 'bad' leader - rich, privileged, public school educated. What has he got in common with 99% of voters? When was the last time he needed a food bank etc.? I voted Labour in 2010 and will vote Labour again. The party is not faultless, but it is not deluded either.

delegate221 Tue 30-Jul-13 20:10:16

I believe the leader is less important that people think. Yes, integrity is important (but then I believe it is in everyone) but charisma or personality no so much. However, I could not vote for a party led by someone I did not respect. But I think that is different from thinking the leader is important in and of him/herself.

I do not care about charisma, but do want a leader who is considered of their opinions, takes expert advice, looks at evidence and has integrity, empathy and compassion.

I did not vote in the last election (but only because we moved rather suddenly between registering and the election and I had just had a baby) but would have voted LibDem. I am undecided about the next general election. As I recognise that being a minority party in a coalition government during a particularly difficult time, as they have been, must be extremely difficulty. But I do feel they have not sufficiently differentiated themselves from the Tories. And in any case, I feel I have become more socialist in since the last general election, so would probably vote Labour.

I would never vote Tory.

delegate221 Tue 30-Jul-13 20:12:29

Oh, just to add. Many Tory policies will probably benefit me indirectly as they would benefit DH's family, and so indirectly me, but I could never vote for a government that sells off the NHS (and Royal Mail) and are so insecure that they cannot tell the real truth about immigration, but pander to the popular (DM) opinions.

delegate216 Tue 30-Jul-13 21:11:54

Thinking about when you decide which party to vote for, how important is the leader of the party in that decision?
The party leader is important in that they are a strong and secure person but i dont think they are as important as the policies put in place and ideals behind
Why?
They need to be in control and be a powerful influence but it isnt the be all and end all of a party. if i particularly did not like a party leaders ideas and views it would put me off though.

What do you look for in a party leader? What makes a good party leader and what makes a bad one? What makes a good prime minister and what makes a bad one?

I think that the main positive thing i recognise in a leader is that they can tackle things from different angles. i dont want a party leader who is only for one section of the people. A good leader cant change everything but they can see where changes can be made and will be effective. they have the support of their own party. a bad leader i believe is one who has no idea how life is for the real people and is seen to target one section without thought for the consequences. I want a strong, powerful leader who can admit when things go wrong and not paper over the cracks.

Thinking about the party you voted for at the 2010 General Election and the party you would vote for now, has it changed?

I was unable to vote in the 2010 election as we had recently moved into our house and werent registered to vote in time. The party that i would of and still do support has not changed i would of voted labour before and would do now. They are the closest to my own ideas and beliefs. they arent perfect. we have really struggled under to cuts brought forward by the tories due to being a seperated family who receive a small amount of hb.

Why?
Why not?

delegate214 Tue 30-Jul-13 22:11:24

I've been thinking about this since posting earlier,and agree with the post that the prime minister should be doing what's best for the country, not themselves, their party and their cronies.

I don't understand how any 'leader' could feel proud of leading a country that doesn't care for its weakest citizens. I see the leader as being like a parent in some way. They should be looking out for the whole family, and trying to do what's best for everyone. The current leader is, ironically, failing to care for the 'sick child' in his 'family'. He is prioritising his most well off, and putting their needs first. I find that shameful.

delegate204 Wed 31-Jul-13 00:59:14

When I decide which party to vote for, I am looking for the one whose core values best match mine. I'm also looking for the party who appear to have a solid economic policy.
So long as this party are not being represented by a complete idiot, who has been elected as their leader, I'm not massively put out.

I, personally, see the leader as a figurehead. He/she represents the 'brand', and should have a good helping of charisma. The leader should also be a capable public speaker and someone with good morals, although I'm happy for these to be learned! The odd uni spliff isn't something that would make me question their respectability, and I get rather bored of the constant analysis of their teenage indiscretions.

A bad party leader is a wavering leader. I actually warm to someone who will change their mind in the face of unequivocal evidence, but a leader should be true to their values, at least. Clegg, take note!
Also, the Tories seem to have a veritable selection of leaders with a vacuum in place of their personalities. It doesn't help.
I agree that it would be beneficial to have the political parties represented by individuals with a real understanding of personal struggles/ real life issues. We need a representative cross section in politics in order to ensure that issues are correctly prioritised.

So, despite the wrong Miliband (IMHO) taking centre stage, I will stay loyal to the Labour Party. Although I am willing to change my mind, dependant upon the issues that I deem significant.
I struggle to see how UKIP or the Greens would have a cat in hell's chance of even vaguely managing the economy. They both rustle up support based on one fundamental vote swinger.
I don't even know what the Lib Dems stand for now, since they diluted themselves with the Tories. The next manifesto will be exciting reading!
The Tories would be the possible contender, if I believed in their policies and any ability to make real positive changes. I think they have fluffed over a lot of very important issues with noise, introduced ill-considered and impractical policies to save a few quid, and caused a lot of sleepless nights for people who have little practical help in actually changing their circumstances.

delegate204 Wed 31-Jul-13 01:01:05

When I decide which party to vote for, I am looking for the one whose core values best match mine. I'm also looking for the party who appear to have a solid economic policy.
So long as this party are not being represented by a complete idiot, who has been elected as their leader, I'm not massively put out.

I, personally, see the leader as a figurehead. He/she represents the 'brand', and should have a good helping of charisma. The leader should also be a capable public speaker and someone with good morals, although I'm happy for these to be learned! The odd uni spliff isn't something that would make me question their respectability, and I get rather bored of the constant analysis of their teenage indiscretions.

A bad party leader is a wavering leader. I actually warm to someone who will change their mind in the face of unequivocal evidence, but a leader should be true to their values, at least. Clegg, take note!
Also, the Tories seem to have a veritable selection of leaders with a vacuum in place of their personalities. It doesn't help.
I agree that it would be beneficial to have the political parties represented by individuals with a real understanding of personal struggles/ real life issues. We need a representative cross section in politics in order to ensure that issues are correctly prioritised.

So, despite the wrong Miliband (IMHO) taking centre stage, I will stay loyal to the Labour Party. Although I am willing to change my mind, dependant upon the issues that I deem significant.
I struggle to see how UKIP or the Greens would have a cat in hell's chance of even vaguely managing the economy. They both rustle up support based on one fundamental vote swinger.
I don't even know what the Lib Dems stand for now, since they diluted themselves with the Tories. The next manifesto will be exciting reading!
The Tories would be the possible contender, if I believed in their policies and any ability to make real positive changes. I think they have fluffed over a lot of very important issues with noise, introduced ill-considered and impractical policies to save a few quid, and caused a lot of sleepless nights for people who have little practical help in actually changing their circumstances.

delegate202 Wed 31-Jul-13 09:54:42

Thinking about when you decide which party to vote for, how important is the leader of the party in that decision?

I think the leader is very important.

Why?

This is the person who is going to "lead" our country and if they have no idea how to relate to the majority of the electorate (looking at you David) and me, then why would I want to vote for them?

What do you look for in a party leader? What makes a good party leader and what makes a bad one? What makes a good prime minister and what makes a bad one?

I look for someone who doesn't seem like they are reading from a script. Someone who is basically like you and me. Doesn't turn their nose up at reading to little kids or talking to the average Joe.
A good party leader is someone who makes you believe they want to help you, who wants to do the best for the country AND the people.
A bad prime minister is someone who only looks after one set of voters, ie Cameron and his cronies. Unfortunately there are more "poor" people than rich in this country and they are the ones who need the most assistance in getting back on their feets, not the bankers and their tax cuts.

Thinking about the party you voted for at the 2010 General Election and the party you would vote for now, has it changed?

Yes

Why?

I have always voted Labour. I grew up in the 80's with a father who was unemployed thanks to Thatcher's privatisation and a mother who cleaned my school to try and make a few extra pennies. We had no car, no holidays, free school meals the lot. Voting Tory has never been an option to me.
However I voted Lib Dem at the last election, to make a point I guess and I bitterly regret it now. They are frankly as full of as much shit as the Tories and Nick Clegg is a power hungry little toad.

Why not?

N/a

delegate202 Wed 31-Jul-13 10:08:34

Or exactly what deleagate203 said!

I also really don't like the way things seem to be heading with regards to the "benefit scroungers" and disabled. It seems every week there is a new "measure" in to combat fraud etc. Yet big companies get away without paying tax and on and on.
I don't know the figures but I assume if this was sorted then there would be no need for the bedroom tax or making people prove they are disabled etc.
I hate to say it but it smacks a bit of Nazi Germany to me and that really scares me.

delegate213 Thu 01-Aug-13 07:35:56

I've been thinking about this a lot. I under stand that you vote for your local mp and not the leader (unless in their constituency) but I think the leader kind of sums up the party: if that's who they want in charge do I feel okay with that?
Having said that, the Tories could put the modern equivalent of Mother Teresa in charge and I still wouldn't vote for them: their actions currently will leave a bad taste for a long time. (Also happened with Labour over Iraq)

AnnMumsnet (MNHQ) Thu 01-Aug-13 09:43:04

Thanks for answering the first questions: some really interesting feedback. Now we want to try to what you really think about the specific leaders.

1) So, these days how well or badly do you think the current main party leaders are doing on understanding the issues and concerned facing women like you.
First of all David Cameron?
And then Nick Clegg?
And then Ed Miliband?
What about another party leader you know of (or one you think should/ could be a party leader) - please name them and then say: how well or badly do they do on this aspect?

2) and how well or badly do you think they make sure or take account of women being heard in their party and in politics generally?
First of all David Cameron?
And then Nick Clegg?
And then Ed Miliband?
What about another party leader you know of (or one you think should/ could be a party leader) - please name them and then say: how well or badly do they do on this aspect?

3) Finally for now - which party - if any - do you trust the most to look after the interests of women? Why? And which do you trust the least? And why?

thanks again - we will add some more questions for the weekend.

delegate213 Thu 01-Aug-13 10:23:44

Woman like me?
Married, middle class, pt worker for a charity, four kids, one disabled.
DC - don't think he understands the financial implications of disability. Am hesitant to say much on this because I doubt very much that money made any difference to his emotional experience of having a disabled son. It's the cuts to benefits for disabled people, the changes to sen law, that make me wonder if visible disabilities are easier for him to understand? I am livid about the end to universal child benefit: circumstances can change in a heartbeat and I feel that a universal amount which covered food and a taxi somewhere safe was A Good Thing. I don't think he sees middle class people as struggling financially as if debt, divorce and disease don't affect us.
EM is completely unknown to me: I cannot get any sort of feel for him. He is pretty silent in terms of raising awareness of his views.
NC did himself no favours with the upturn on tuition fees. F
Getting jnto massive debt at the start of your working life is a really bad idea. I don't feel any of them consider a 3d view of other people: those on benefits are scroungers, those on min wage are hardworking salts of the earth and the middle classes are ripe for tapping for cash and sharp elbowed.

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