Who's coming on the anti-austerity march on 20 October? Sign in here

(58 Posts)
ninjasquirrel Tue 09-Oct-12 20:18:26

Given the anger on many other threads, I can't be the only one...

afuturethatworks.org/why-we-are-marching/

grimbletart Sun 21-Oct-12 17:24:57

Yes ttosca - no need to lecture me. I'm retired but spent half my working life of 45 years as an employee and half as a business person so I think I may have gathered a little information over the years as to how capitalism and the world works.

I understand perfectly what you say but I think you have overlooked my qualifying phrase i.e that they couldn't afford.

Paradisefound Sun 21-Oct-12 18:34:54

I was speaking to a friend today. His daughter moved out to Greece about 10 yrs ago. The daughter says things are so bad out there people are giving up their own kids.
The government has no choice - the cut backs are necessary to protect every bodies future.

niceguy2 Mon 22-Oct-12 08:32:28

OK Solopower, let me revise my earlier statement to be more accurate then.

The anticuts protest is made up of two groups:

1) Economic flatearther's who don't believe any cuts are needed despite the fact we still need to borrow £120 billion per year. That we should keep borrowing because hey....we need to spend our way out of a debt crisis!?!?! It's a bit like an alcoholic saying he will quit drinking tomorrow.

2) Economic NIMBY's who believe that a few cuts are needed but not any cuts which affect them personally.

JuliaScurr Mon 22-Oct-12 14:00:40

<waves to marchers>

Has everybody read 'The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists'?

Claig & co should smile

ttosca Mon 22-Oct-12 15:15:27

'nice'guy-

Your ignorance knows no bounds.

Please provide a reference for the £120 Billion figure. It looks hugely unrealistic. Secondly, the current deficit is bound to be large because we are in the middle of a double-dip recession caused by the financial crisis, which means tax revenue has dipped.

The structural deficit below the recession occurred was at 3%, which was slightly about EU average. Now with cuts in spending, it's more likely to be around 2% - which is roughly where it has been for the past few decades.

Secondly, It's nothing like an alcoholic needing more alcohol, as has been explained to you 1000 times before. Spending can actually increase growth and pull the country out of a recession, resulting in greater tax revenue and lower welfare costs, ultimately decreasing the deficit.

Cutting drastically, harming the economy, is a false economy, since it exacerbates and prolongs the recession. How many times, 'nice'guy? How many times?

niceguy2 Mon 22-Oct-12 16:19:20

....and makes it more likely that Osborne will succeed in trimming borrowing for 2012/13 to 120 billion pounds from 122 billion in 2011/12 (source)

We can spend to fuel growth. But said spending should come from our existing tax revenues, not from borrowing more money. It's just nonsensical to say that the answer to our debt problem is to borrow more money.

ttosca Mon 22-Oct-12 16:31:16

We can spend to fuel growth. But said spending should come from our existing tax revenues, not from borrowing more money.

If we're already in deficit, then any money we spend will, by definition be borrowed. Or are you saying we should stimulate growth only when in surplus?

It's just nonsensical to say that the answer to our debt problem is to borrow more money.

A national budget is nothing like a household budget. A national budget is nothing like a household budget. A national budget is nothing like a household budget. A national budget is nothing like a household budget. A national budget is nothing like a household budget. A national budget is nothing like a household budget. A national budget is nothing like a household budget. A national budget is nothing like a household budget. A national budget is nothing like a household budget. A national budget is nothing like a household budget. A national budget is nothing like a household budget. A national budget is nothing like a household budget. A national budget is nothing like a household budget.

niceguy2 Mon 22-Oct-12 16:35:09

No, i'm saying we use some of the money we're saving via cuts to fund growth projects. Rather than keep spending regardless and borrow more money in the hope that one day it pays off.

And I think something's wrong with your computer. Maybe you need a new keyboard?

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