Rescuing/adopting a puppy with children?

(9 Posts)

Are there any charities/centres that allow you to do this? We have four children who are 10, 9, 7 and 4 who have all grown up with dogs. We have a gsdx and prior to that a large collie x lab.
We would like a puppy, of a similar breed so collie or collie x, maybe lab xs etc

A while back we decided we would like a puppy so I spent ages trawling sites, we are willing to travel for the right dog so that's a lot of sites. Every time we found a puppy we liked we were turned down due to the children's ages.
This week we've started looking again and yet again have been turned down because of our youngest's age. One even told us everything else looked perfect on our application apart from that.

Is there any chance of us getting a puppy within the rescue system? I really would not like to buy from a breeder, there are enough dogs already and wouldn't touch a farm with a barge pole.

I beginning to see why people just buy a puppy. <frustrated>

sewingandcakes Thu 16-Jan-14 14:12:13

We got our most recent dog, a collie, when our kids were 5 and 3, from Leigh cats and dogs home. There was no issue with us having kids; they were with us when we chose her. We have also rehomed puppies from Manchester dogs home, where there would also have been no problem.

Where are you? I'm sure there will be somewhere that'll be ok with it. You're doing the right thing!

One place I know that may allow it is Faith in norfolk (were in norfolk) as that's where we got out current dog from when she was 18 months.
I've been keeping an eye on them for a while and nothing suitable has come up. I think making phone calls and asking may be the way to go

Just seems mad that we would be allowed an older dog with our children yet not a puppy

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Can tell I'm peeved as my typing goes to pot

mistlethrush Thu 16-Jan-14 14:21:31

I'm in the lurcher side of things (you could go for a collie greyhound lurcher!) and I think all of the reputable lurcher rescues would consider you... Why do you specifically want a puppy out of interest? You could avoid the teething and (probably) housetraining if you went for a slightly older dog - and might be able to have a better idea of the character of the dog you were getting, particularly if you got them from one of the foster care situations.

Varies reasons. We don't want to inherit another persons bad habits yet again for one. Retraining is harder than training.
Not really a big fan of lurchers, I mean they're lovely but not for us.

mistlethrush Thu 16-Jan-14 16:18:20

I'm not going to force a lurcher on you! I was just meaning that I only have experience of them recently. Not all older dogs have 'issues' - although I agree that some do (and with a young family I can see why you wouldn't want that). My point was, with the right dog of the right breed, you might find that a slightly older dog is easier - provided that you did find one that didn't have lots of baggage. You might also find that a puppy doesn't turn into the dog you're expecting..

Slippersandacuppa Thu 16-Jan-14 16:21:21

Look at the many tears website. They have dogs all over and said it wouldn't have been a problem for us (3 and 1 year old at the time) depending on the dog because we'd
rescued dogs before. Seriously considering another one now...good luck!

Many tears were the ones who said that the 8 wk old puppy we enquired about would only go to 8+ Years and made the nice comment about our application. Most of their puppies seem to be in Kent or South Wales which is too far.

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