Bring and take

(4 Posts)
LostAtTheFair Thu 15-Sep-16 20:18:11

Hi, I'm new to this corner (as you will see from the below!). Just looking for a bit of guidance on something I know I get wrong from time to time - hope that's ok.

It is very common to use "bring" where I live. For example "I'm going to bring the children to school". ASFAIK it should be "take" as one is taking the children away to school. Is that correct? And would you then "bring" them back home with you? Is there any easy way of remembering when to say "bring" and when to say "take"?

TIA

Ah now where I live the vet would say would say

Take the dog back to me next week for a check up

Drives me mad

Bring when you are bringing something / someone along with you (to an event, to an appointment)

Take when you are taking it/them back (home, taking it back from someone)

I think that's right?

Take the bairns over for a sleepover says my mil. Noooo mil I will bring them!

bluebiro Fri 16-Sep-16 00:01:58

This explains it quite well:
dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/bring-take-and-fetch

Essentially it's "take" when something is going away from you or the person you're speaking to, and "bring" when something is coming towards you or the person you're speaking to.

So, I will take something on holiday, but bring something back. Or I'll take the kids to school and bring them back. I suppose at the time I'm actually at the school, I would say I am "taking" them home as it's going away from where I am now. But if I were at home I would say I will "bring" them home from school as they would be coming towards where I am now. confused

LostAtTheFair Fri 16-Sep-16 23:24:20

Thanks bluebiro that's very helpful

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