'It needs washing' or 'it needs to be washed' which is right?

(18 Posts)
MrsJoeHart Fri 14-Feb-14 20:47:46

DH says the former, Is any the latter. Are we both right?

MrsJoeHart Fri 14-Feb-14 20:48:20

Arg autocorrect again, should read I say the latter.

yegodsandlittlefishes Fri 14-Feb-14 20:50:34

Both are correct.

Seasonsgreetings Fri 14-Feb-14 20:51:19

Save yourself!

The latter.

There is no debate.

DameFanny Fri 14-Feb-14 20:51:48

Both are right. "needs washed" would be wrong.

DramaAlpaca Fri 14-Feb-14 20:52:08

I think "it needs to be washed" is correct.

I think "It needs washing" is colloquial. It's what I would say, but I wouldn't write it formally. Not that I can ever imagine needing to write formally about doing the laundry!

eightandthreequarters Fri 14-Feb-14 20:53:15

The latter.

NigellasDealer Fri 14-Feb-14 20:54:43

if you say something naturally in normal conversation then it is correct. this is because English as a language has no 'academie' (like French and Spanish have) to establish what is correct and what is not, and that is its strength as an international language.
'needs washed' is not wrong as a great deal of native speakers of English would say this.

BadgerB Tue 18-Feb-14 06:58:35

What about 'It needs a wash'?

meditrina Tue 18-Feb-14 07:00:58

I think either are correct.

yegodsandlittlefishes Tue 18-Feb-14 15:39:28

Either is correct.

I'm Scottish and say 'It needs washed'.

chateauferret Wed 19-Feb-14 18:38:45

"Et's tae get washed", washed rhymes with smashed.

Bonsoir Wed 19-Feb-14 18:39:47

Both are completely correct!

JumpJockey Wed 19-Feb-14 18:45:18

My DH says "I'll just put a washing on". No you won't, you'll put on a wash, or some washing.

Not that I'm going to complain, obviously, grin and he is Scottish so maybe that's something to do with it.

JessieMcJessie Tue 11-Mar-14 17:04:42

Yep - "needs to be washed" or "needs a wash"- standard English.
"needs washing"- English dialect.
"needs washed"- Scottish dialect.

For my money the Scottish dialect is closer to the standard as it's just a contraction, whereas the English have randomly turned the verb into a present participle. I am if course Scottish. I have a Yorkshire colleague who says things like "Does that report want doing/letter want sending/room want booking". Sounds comical to me.

And we'd never say "put it in the wash", only "put it in the washing" (or "pit it in the washing, washing rhyming with smashing as a previous poster said. )

Floggingmolly Tue 11-Mar-14 17:06:01

The second is correct.

pancakedayiscoming Tue 11-Mar-14 17:06:15

The latter.

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