I'm going to James' house.

(32 Posts)
LOLisNOTaPunctuationMark Sat 02-Nov-13 13:47:27

Prepared to admit I'm wrong. Really, I'm just seeking clarification.

Apostrophe and an S still apply when assigning an object to a person whose name ends with an S. Yes?

So why do so many people think otherwise? Is it an optional rule?
I'm honestly not one to get too bothered about grammar and the like.. but this is one thing that bothers me.

I've just received a text from my sister - an English teacher - saying, "I'm going to James' house tonight."

That doesn't make sense to me. It should be, "I'm going to James's house tonight."

You wouldn't say "I'm going to Anne house." You would say, "I'm going to Anne's house."

"I'm going to my mum house for Christmas."
NO!
"I'm going to my mum's house for Christmas."

Can anyone clear this up before my overtired head implodes? grin

candyflossisevil Sat 02-Nov-13 13:50:19

Yes you are right. Also wouldn't James' imply there was more than one James?

BrianButterfield Sat 02-Nov-13 13:54:10

The extra S is optional, I'm afraid. There's nothing wrong with "James' house".

AnnoyingOrange Sat 02-Nov-13 13:55:04

It's optional? confused

It's not - it should be "James' house'. Disclaimer: English is not my first language, happy to be educated grin

JoinYourPlayfellows Sat 02-Nov-13 13:58:01

Either is fine.

James's house is more popular these days with the style guides.

I prefer it - it is clearer.

BrianButterfield Sat 02-Nov-13 13:58:49

It is optional - it's a stylistic decision. You will find, for example, some newspaper house style guides allow either the omission or the inclusion of the extra S depending on what looks better written down.

Oh. Ok, I see.

Thanks for the link too <lives and learns>

Moxiegirl Sat 02-Nov-13 14:02:36

I thought it was James's and same for similar names except Jesus.

mercibucket Sat 02-Nov-13 14:03:17

I prefer your sister's version. Both are fine though

ThenAgain Sat 02-Nov-13 14:05:09

Jesus has a house? :D

LovelyMarchHare Sat 02-Nov-13 14:05:24

I never add the S after the apostrophe. Bit too fussy for my liking. I am aware that either are perfectly acceptable but I'm a bit stripped back when it comes to punctuation!

JoinYourPlayfellows Sat 02-Nov-13 14:08:23

I think it's far fussier not to add the extra S. It's not like it's too much effort after any other letter.

It's one of those things that people who pride themselves on their pedantry tend to think is the RIGHT way.

BillyBanter Sat 02-Nov-13 14:10:23

It's optional. And has been for a while or on and off for a long time these would suggest:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_James's_Street

www.sjp.org.uk/historybuilding.html

BillyBanter Sat 02-Nov-13 14:13:05

When I was going for an interview in St James's Street I thought I'd been told St Jane's street. when I looked at the map at the tube station I realised it must be St James's Street but had been pronounced St James' street despite the spelling. I still don't know how it should be pronounced. I say St. Jamesis street.

TallulahBetty Sat 02-Nov-13 14:14:58

It's optional, but I always use it. My name ends in S and I've always used 's too. Looks nicer and definitely clearer.

LOLisNOTaPunctuationMark Sat 02-Nov-13 14:16:41

Thank you all. smile Can't believe such a big thing is optional. I'll read that link just now.

LOLisNOTaPunctuationMark Sat 02-Nov-13 14:18:10

Same here, Billy, how should it be pronounced then? If it's written as James' would you still say James's or just say James'? confused

JoinYourPlayfellows Sat 02-Nov-13 14:21:40

"If it's written as James' would you still say James's or just say James'?"

People who leave off the second s when writing, also tend to leave it off when speaking.

Which can be confusing.

Reading that I thought I like Horry's post that said
'I spell it like I say it. The Smiths' car is older than the Joneses' car. James's car is longer than Laurence's car.'
Then I realised that I have a James and would use James'.
I need a coffee.

Join, I would use James' but I would say Jamesis/ziz.

BoundandRebound Sat 02-Nov-13 14:29:10

Joneses' would never be right if meaning Jones possessive

It could be Jones' or Jones's but not Joneses' unless the name is Joneses of course

BillyBanter Sat 02-Nov-13 14:29:16

I think spelling and saying James's is less confusing all round although I accept that in some circumstances it's possible it could be cumbersome and awkward to look at spell and say. Can't think of an example though.

JoinYourPlayfellows Sat 02-Nov-13 14:30:42

"Join, I would use James' but I would say Jamesis/ziz."

You FREAK! wink grin

You can't have it both ways! (You can really. It doesn't matter.)

I'm going to go back to calling ds2 Jamie. grin

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