W H Smiths

(7 Posts)
mersea208 Sun 01-Sep-13 20:00:32

Has anyone else seen they are selling BOOKAZINES?! Nearly fainted when I saw this.

Mogz Mon 02-Sep-13 04:02:59

Bookazine has been an accepted publishing term for a while, at least 5 years (when I started current job), I do agree though, as do a lot of editors and writers, that it is a horrid word.

confettiwoman Fri 06-Sep-13 16:13:04

Better than Magooks i suppose

timidviper Fri 06-Sep-13 16:17:48

Wtf is a bookazine? I mean I can guess part book, part magazine, but how?

chateauferret Sun 08-Sep-13 22:30:47

It's just a back-formation. The language pretends that the latter part of a word is a productive suffix and makes new words by appending it to other roots giving new meanings. For example, hamburger is a German loan word which in that language is an indeclinable adjective of provenance, meaning 'something or someone from Hamburg'. (It's actually formed from a real productive suffix -er appended to the place name). Many such place names in Germany have their adjectives subverted to indicate a food or drink, as the American president did when he announced "ich bin ein Berliner" ('I am a small pink boiled sausage').

I digress. A Hamburger was applied to denote a beef pattie in a roll as typically made in that city. When the Yanks got hold of it they decided that "-burger" was a productive prefix (which as far as German was concerned was bollocks) and gave us cheeseburger, chicken burger, and so on. The irony is that McDonalds now sell things with these names in Germany which can now indeed also make back formations with -burger, like Schnitzelburger. There is of course no such place as Schnitzelburg.

I once saw an American tourist ask in a tourist office if he could visit "Cheeseburg".

WMittens Sat 14-Sep-13 16:41:31

It's a portmanteau, just like smog, motel and Velcro (taken from that link).

as the American president did when he announced "ich bin ein Berliner" ('I am a small pink boiled sausage').

Apparently not: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ich_bin_ein_Berliner If anything he would have called himself a doughnut, but his statement was still the correct way to say what he wanted to say.

When the Yanks got hold of it they decided that "-burger" was a productive prefix

That would be a suffix.

They did the same thing with wiener from Vienna (Wien). It's not a radically different principle from 'sandwich', 'Champagne' or 'Cheddar'.

nonmifairidere Tue 17-Sep-13 19:03:15

I rather like Magook - but then I am a very short-sighted fellow.

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