Has anyone done this quiz?

(40 Posts)
PanicMode Mon 15-Apr-13 09:49:13

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationquestions/9987757/Good-grammar-test-can-you-pass.html

I thought my grammar was fairly solid, but was quite shocked by the result.

Trills Mon 15-Apr-13 09:50:39

If I wanted to be very very pedantic I would answer you with "yes, I expect someone has done that quiz". grin

EugenesAxe Mon 15-Apr-13 10:00:27

I got 58%; it was all the 'nowhere near good enough' questions that shafted me. And the Latin one. And Evelyn; I genuinely still can't see how you can tell he's male.

It was hard though... and like you I generally consider myself OK!

PanicMode Mon 15-Apr-13 10:11:51

Ha, Trills!! I read it so carefully before I posted but hadn't anticipated that response!

EugenesAxe - I also, still, do not understand how you know it is a male sibling.

Trills Mon 15-Apr-13 10:29:23

I think that you don't necessarily have to know what parts of speech are called in order to use them correctly.

AuntieStella Mon 15-Apr-13 10:39:57

Clickable link

I had two wrong answers, and would also like to know the reasoning for the "Evelyn" answer.

duchesse Mon 15-Apr-13 10:40:07

75% Go me and my French education... grin

Isn't there some rule about ladies first in introductions, meaning that Evelyn has to be male because s/he is introduced last?

ginslinger Mon 15-Apr-13 10:40:08

I got 67%. I got the sibling question wrong, the first question wrong and 'my teaching you' wrong. It was very hard, I think.

Trills Mon 15-Apr-13 10:47:05

"Isn't there some rule about ladies first in introductions, meaning that Evelyn has to be male because s/he is introduced last?"

That would be point of etiquette rather than grammar, wouldn't it?

WowOoo Mon 15-Apr-13 10:48:53

I chose Evelyn as male as it might have said 'one of my sisters' otherwise. I have no idea why it's correct in all honesty!

I got 83%. Quite a lot of lucky guessing.

PanicMode Mon 15-Apr-13 10:49:42

I have found the setter's answer to the sibling question. I don't think it's a very satisfactory one (IMHO) grin.

11. “I should like to introduce you to my sister Amanda, who lives in New York, to my brother Mark who doesn't, and to my only other sibling, Evelyn."
The absence of a comma before "who doesn't" makes that clause part of the definition of Mark, implying that there are other brothers. Try reading the sentence with the word "Mark" omitted.

58% - I don't think I've even heard of "adverbs qualifying adverbs" before.

And I don't get the Evelyn question either, unless it's to do with etiquette rather than grammar or logic.

JuliaScurr Mon 15-Apr-13 11:02:47

50%
blush
<gets coat>
<points out 'coat' is noun>

BOF Mon 15-Apr-13 11:05:29

75%. It was a bit of a brain melter though.

WowOoo Mon 15-Apr-13 11:07:53

Have just re read my reasoning for the Evelyn answer and it makes no sense at all!

Your explanation Op, DOES make sense!

senua Mon 15-Apr-13 11:13:45

The Evelyn question is a bit suspect. I think the reasoning that the speaker has the brother-who-doesn't live-in NY, which implies that he is trying to differentiate him from another brother. Therefore the only other sibling, Evelyn, must be male.

I'm glad that it wasn't a timed test.

50% here too! I don't even know what a preposition is. I was at school when they didn't teach grammar. BUT I think I write well, in normal life!

Trills Mon 15-Apr-13 11:14:45

So:

"my brother who doesn't" suggests that there is also a brother who does.

Is that it?

Frankly I think whoever is supposedly uttering that sentence is being an arse. If someone referred to "my brother" and "my sister" and "my sibling" I'd think that the other sibling was probably having some gender identity issues, and that the speaker was unsure with how to refer to them or uncomfortable referring to them with their chosen gender.

senua Mon 15-Apr-13 11:15:11

Ooops. My post was edited several times. Hence grammatical garbage. <gets coat>

somebloke123 Mon 15-Apr-13 11:15:48

58% - a bit chastening as I thought I would do better.

senua Mon 15-Apr-13 11:17:20

grin @ gender issues.

Which of these names is in fact the nominative feminine singular of the gerundive mood imported direct from Latin?

Would someone like to explain why this says 'direct' and not 'directly'?

xxDebstarxx Mon 15-Apr-13 11:59:15

Lily I must be close in age to you because I was in school when they didn't teach grammar! I also got 50%.

EugenesAxe Mon 15-Apr-13 12:07:59

I didn't notice that there are explanations on the correct answers at the bottom of the quiz. Here is the explanation for Evelyn; I do understand now, just about!

“I should like to introduce you to my sister Amanda, who lives in New York, to my brother Mark who doesn't, and to my only other sibling, Evelyn."

The absence of a comma before "who doesn't" makes that clause part of the definition of Mark, implying that there are other brothers. Try reading the sentence with the word "Mark" omitted.

EugenesAxe Mon 15-Apr-13 12:09:34

So well done Trills, although I thought duchesse's suggestion was very gallant, and nice.

So, they are highlighting some subtle difference between saying -

Amanda, who lives in New York

and Mark who doesn't (without the comma)?

Frankly I'd say that is a very obscure piece of nitpicking, rather than being about the proper use of grammar. It's the kind of thing that gives pedants a bad name!

Anyone who worded that sentence in that way, in the expectation of communicating accurately with other people, is an idiot. Which entirely goes against the reasons why some of us think that grammar matters. The point is that properly constructed sentences make sense and don't leave ambiguity about what you mean (except where that is your intention).

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