What's the difference between an aisle and an isle?

(16 Posts)

Huh?

Huh?

Hhu?

angry

EverythingInMjiniature Sun 13-Jan-13 23:29:16

Aisle in a church, isle surrounded by water

AnyaKnowIt Sun 13-Jan-13 23:29:27

an aisle is what you get in shops and isle is an island

SminkoPinko Sun 13-Jan-13 23:29:56

confused Are you seriously asking? Or is this a common error that's annoying you?

<<eyeroll>>

Yus, I know.

wink

toomuch2young Sun 13-Jan-13 23:30:07

Isn't one like a supermarket aisle? Or walking up the church aisle?

Wheras isle is like an island?

toomuch2young Sun 13-Jan-13 23:31:41

Slow typing! And confused by question now!!

2kidsintow Sun 13-Jan-13 23:36:55

lol....

I'm personally annoyed (slightly) by the number of my friends etc that don't know the difference between

borrow/lend
less/fewer
specific/pacific

MirandaWest Sun 13-Jan-13 23:39:55

I was marking exams recently where an answer involved an aisle. There were many isles involved in the answers I marked.

IamtheZombie Sun 13-Jan-13 23:44:33

You OK, Chaos?

Yup.

I'm "good".

[wikn]

Serious;y, NO.

PootlePosyPerkin Sun 13-Jan-13 23:51:31

What is r..isle..ing you Chaos? grin Or, r..aisle..ing you obviously grin.

PootlePosyPerkin Sun 13-Jan-13 23:53:44

And god yes, 2kidsintow. "Can I lend some money" is quite a common phrase round these parts. One friend in particular, looks very confused when I reply "yes please" grin.

steppemum Sun 13-Jan-13 23:55:27

bring and take

THEY ARE NOT THE SAME!!!!!!

(feel better now, rant over)

There's a large sign outside a local school for its Toy Library inviting you to "come and lend some exciting toys today".

Sigh.

badtime Fri 18-Jan-13 12:05:32

Steppemum, bring and take are indeed different, but the usage is different in different dialects.

In Hiberno-English (from Wikipedia, sorry):

"Bring and take: Irish use of these words differs from that of British English because it follows the Gaelic grammar for beir and tóg. English usage is determined by direction; person determines Irish usage. So, in English, one takes "from here to there", and brings it "to here from there". In Irish, a person takes only when accepting a transfer of possession of the object from someone else – and a person brings at all other times, irrespective of direction (to or from).

Don't forget to bring your umbrella with you when you leave.
(To a child) Hold my hand: I don't want someone to take you."

I often find myself bringing things when an English person would take them. (and in these situations, the past tense is often brung, not brought!)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiberno-English#Grammar_and_syntax

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