'An euphemism' or 'a euphemism'?

(11 Posts)
SkeletonButterfly Thu 25-Oct-12 13:27:50

It sounds like it should be the latter, but isn't there a 'rule' that states it is the former?

catkind Thu 25-Oct-12 13:31:12

Think either is acceptable. <shifty look - I got sworn at last time I ventured an opinion on grammar round here>

Snazzyspookyandscary Thu 25-Oct-12 13:33:17

Never hear of said rule. So I would go with the sensible approach and assume that the sound dictates 'a euphemism' is fine. If anyone can post a reputable link showing otherwise I'll be interested to see it.

catkind How rude! Nothing wrong with venturing an opinion. There are more grey areas than people think.

IWipeArses Thu 25-Oct-12 13:35:08

I don't know a rule for that, but say it out loud 'a new-femism'

crabb Thu 25-Oct-12 13:47:31

I would say it more like 'you-femism'. The 'y' sound is a consonant sound in this case, not a vowel sound if you see what I mean. The rule applies to words beginning with a 'proper' vowel sound, thus an orange, an apple. It flows better this way in speech - to say ' an euphemism' is very jerky and awkward.

VintageRainBoots Tue 06-Nov-12 06:00:01

I would say "a euphemism." Even though euphemism starts with a vowel, it doesn't start with a vowel sound. It's as if it starts with the consonant version of "y". It's the same reason you say "a young person" instead of "an young person."

nickelrocketgoBooooooom Tue 06-Nov-12 17:13:52

a euphemism.
because the "eu" makes the sounds "you" therefore doesn't act like a vowel.

Oh crikey! Surely it's 'a'. I can't have got it wrong all these years?

After. After all these years!

a euphemism

FellatioNelson Tue 06-Nov-12 17:42:30

I have never heard euphemism pronounced with an oo sound. Ever.

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