Preschool leaving fees.....

(14 Posts)
Brewster Thu 14-May-15 18:50:54

We have decided to not return in september to the preschool our daughter is currently in.

We let them know at the beginning of this week as we needed to find a new one and also wanted to give it a few weeks after the easter holidays to see how she was getting on.
She started the half term before the easter holidays but after the holidays she has seemed very unhappy there and we have not been impressed with the care there despite it being an outstanding by ofsted.

So now they are saying as we have left it so late to tell them we will have to pay a full terms fees.

This seems a bit excessive and i am not too chuffed to say the least as we are not just moving her for the sake of moving it is their fault we are having to take her out.

Anyone else had this?

Thanks

Nolim Thu 14-May-15 18:53:39

What does the contract say?

SoupDragon Thu 14-May-15 18:53:43

What did it say on the terms and conditions that you agreed to?

Brewster Thu 14-May-15 19:04:37

yeah it does kinda say a terms notice BUT my problem is that how are you even supposed to give a terms notice if the problem is them?
We aren't moving her out cos of a house move or a decision that gives us time - we want her out cos they are not doing a good enough job!

Brewster Thu 14-May-15 19:06:01

Not much else in life makes you give much more than a months notice to leave does it.
Renting, job, any other financial agreement etc....

How would you even really know what you are doing or what is going to happen in a terms time?

Nolim Thu 14-May-15 19:06:45

Well if the contract says so i dont think you can argue that the clause doesnt apply because you are unsatisfied. Sorry.

chippednailvarnish Thu 14-May-15 19:07:41

You agreed to the contract, then you have to pay unfortunately...

Brewster Thu 14-May-15 19:16:04

But wouldnt you say that if they are not doing what i think is the proper care of my child and she is unhappy and unsettled there then at the least we should only have to pay a portion of it?

SoupDragon Thu 14-May-15 19:20:40

Not much else in life makes you give much more than a months notice to leave does it.

A term's notice is standard with school fees.

VegasIsBest Thu 14-May-15 19:21:56

If you are removing her because care is unsatisfactory then you should go in and discuss this with the nursery as they aren't upholding their end of the contract. However you'd need to present some very clear evidence that things are not satisfactory.

Be prepared for relations with the nursery to deteriorate very rapidly if you do that however - to the extent that you'd really need to remove your daughter now rather than at the end of term.

icklekid Thu 14-May-15 19:23:47

I'm sure they don't want her to be unhappy and unsettled so they could say it's not their fault...sorry just playing devils advocate. I think if the contract says a term then you will have to accept that

meditrina Thu 14-May-15 19:25:38

A full term's notice is standard for a school-based setting, and those which run termly. Year-round settings will specify a number of weeks (usually between 4 and 12).

If the term's notice period is set out in the T&Cs, you will need to pay.

If it ends up in court, it can be hard for the parents to win. You will need a clear, documented account of instances of substandard care, and that you used and exhausted the grievance procedure; and what was the precipitating event that changed things between the last point you could have given the required notice and the time you did.

chippednailvarnish Thu 14-May-15 19:50:40

But wouldnt you say that if they are not doing what i think is the proper care of my child and she is unhappy and unsettled there then at the least we should only have to pay a portion of it?

Well, no actually. What is deemed by you to not be "proper care"? Unless they are going against what is laid out in their contract / handbooks then it's your opinion against theirs. Asmerditrina says you need to provide documented proof.

Brewster Thu 14-May-15 20:20:21

ok cheers everyone

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now