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Fissler pots and pans feedback thread: Non Testers: add your own feedback or top tips for keeping pans lasting - you could win a £100 giftcard NOW CLOSED

(147 Posts)
MichelleMumsnet Netherlands (MNHQ) Mon 12-Aug-13 14:12:32

This thread is for the 16 MNers who received a Fissler pot or pan from Tesco to test out.
If your not an official tester but have tried a Fissler pan or pot please do also add your feedback to this thread. If you don't have a Fissler pan or pot then we'd love you to add your own tips on keeping your pans long lasting below.

All non testers who add feedback or a tip will be entered into a prize draw where one MNer will win a £100 Tesco voucher

Here's what Fissler have to say, "We have a wide range of pots and pans which are all of high quality, and they have recently become available at Tesco Direct. Their reinforced bases ensure optimal heat absorption, distribution and storage, which makes cooking your food evenly easier as well as saving energy. All our products can be used in the oven as well as on the hob, with the exception of induction. They are also easy to clean, and all our pans have a non-stick coating which means that greasing the pan becomes optional."

On test were:
20cm non stick frying pan
24cm stockpot with lid
28cm non stick grillpan
20cm casserole with lid
28cm non stick stir fry pan
16cm non stick saucepan
24cm non stick frying pan
28cm non stick frying pan

We'd love to know what you thought of the Fissler product you received and have some questions to get you going, but feel free to add any other thoughts you might have:

~ Before you used the Fissler pan for the first time you needed to activate the non stick coating: how was this?
~ What recipes did you cook in your Fissler? How did the pan help?
~ Was your Fissler easy to clean or not? How did you clean it? Dishwasher or by hand?
~ How does the pan compare to your previous pans?
~ Would you recommend Fissler products to friends and family if it came up in conversation? If so, why? If not, why not?
~ Do you think you'll buy more from the range - by collecting the stickers from Tesco to get 70% off RRP?

Everyone who adds their feedback here will be entered into a prize draw to win a £100 Tesco voucher

Please note comments made on this thread may be used by Tesco and/or Fissler elsewhere. Your MN name will not be used.

Thanks,

MNHQ

gazzalw Mon 12-Aug-13 14:14:24

Non-tester here...I would say that my best tip would be to spend as much as you can on saucepans etc...in the first place. I would definitely say you get what you pay for and very good quality pans will see you thro' a lifetime...

Tiggles Mon 12-Aug-13 15:24:23

I'll add more comments when I/DH have used it more, but first impressions...
Love the weight of the frying pan.
Both DH and I find the shape/angle of the handle slightly awkward.
DH (who is a toolmaker by trade) remarked that looking at the top of the frying pan the join of the handle to the pan looks good quality, but on turning it over he was disappointed in the build quality of the seam join in the handle.
Activating the non-stick coating was very easy.
I prepared a chicken/tomato pasta sauce in the pan, it cooked the chicken through quickly and evenly, and without using any oil in the pan nothing burnt on the bottom.
I cleaned it in the dishwasher, but it wasn't particularly dirty at the end so wouldn't have been an issue to do by hand.
The weight of the pan is better than my previous frying pan, but I don't find the handle comfortable to use so a pro and a con. Currently I would consider buying other products from the range, but I'll reserve judgement fully until DH (the usual chef in the family) has used it too. But, I don't tend to use Tesco as they are further away than our general supermarket, so it would partly depend on how much I'd need to spend/how regularly need to spend to get the vouchers.

Non-tester. As pots and pans get a lot of use, Ive always thought that its best to spend as much as you can afford as you always get what you pay for. Often quality pans have a good sturdy weight to them. I also think that its important to ensure they have a good life span, follow the instructions carefully when it comes to using and cleaning them after use.

manfalou Mon 12-Aug-13 16:13:58

Non Tester.

Buy a good quality pan in the first place, nonstick and use a non scratch sponge to clean is. We use our wok at least 5 days a week and go through one every year and a half even following the instructions. If we bought low range ones i think we'd have to buy a couple more in that time span.

VonTrappFan Mon 12-Aug-13 17:23:11

I received the grill pan. Activating the non-stick coating was easy and the weight of the pan is good. I have cooked bacon and chicken in it and both came out well. It washed easily both in the dishwasher and by hand.

I usually use cast iron, which I still prefer, but for non-cast iron it was pretty good apart from the handle. It was already loose when I got it and had to be tightened up. (DH did that so not quite sure what this entailed!) Because of this I would stick with cast iron where the handle is part of the one piece.

I will start collecting the Tesco stickers now and would consider getting other pans from this range.

nowwearefour Mon 12-Aug-13 17:36:24

We spent a small fortune on a set of fissler pans around 6 yrs ago. They are still as brand new and I expect them to last me til the end of my life. Amazing. Plenty of soaking of anything burnt on and they always come up good as new.
Fabulous products. Well worth the money.

nameuschangeus Mon 12-Aug-13 17:45:23

I am not part of the official test group but I have bought two of the pans via the Tesco offer and they're great. They need virtually no oil, the non stick is actually genuinely non stick, they wash up lovely and I'm going to go and get some more when I've got enough coupons. They're miles better than some if the posh pans I've tried in the past (I'm talking to you pampered chef) as nothing sticks to them, including egg. I love them.

majjsu Mon 12-Aug-13 18:25:08

A non tester, I always soak the pan immediately after cooking, makes them last longer for me. Though may have to check out the Fissler ones after the great feedback.

IncaAztec Mon 12-Aug-13 18:33:23

My tip is to handwash your pans to keep them in tip top condition. Dishwashers (and in particular dishwashers in areas with hard water that require a lot of salt/rinse aid) gradually erode at pans over time. So, if you want them to last longer, handwash them!

stephgr Mon 12-Aug-13 18:35:01

As a non-tester, my tip is to keep a cheap old pan for boiling eggs and only boil eggs in that particular pan. The reason being, and it may be an old wives' tale, is that over time boiling eggs can change the shape of a pan. Apparently it's something to do with the minerals in egg shells. It would be a shame to spoil one of the nice Fissler pans (which I don't have and sadly am not trialling!) On the same egg theme, after boiling eggs you should save the water they boiled in, wait for it to go cold and then use that water to water houseplants. Apparently plants love the water because of the minerals from the eggs' shells.

sharond101 Mon 12-Aug-13 21:43:19

I was gutted not to be chosen for this so reading with interest.

Cherrygrape Tue 13-Aug-13 11:25:19

Non tester here. I make sure I use enough oil, soak them as soon as possible and try not to use anything too scratchy to clean it.
I might try not putting them in the dishwasher unless neccissary after reading the tip above smile

SaltySeaBird Tue 13-Aug-13 11:36:16

I was disappointed not to be chosen for this one or any test as we tend to get through a lot of pots and pans. I always cook from scratch so they get a lot of use and I tend to buy products in this price range. Most of my current ones are about two - three years old and need replacing.

I'm not sure I have any great tips for making them last as mine often don't. Don't let my DH use them would be one as he does tend to burn and bake food in them, and then chips away using a knife ...

Washing up by hand using a soft sponge and soaking pans is a better way to make them last.

I think I will try buying cheaper pans though and just replacing more often as I haven't found my last set has stood the test of time, whereas my sister takes a more disposable attitude and probably ends up spending less!

MrsGeologist Tue 13-Aug-13 11:38:04

~ Before you used the Fissler pan for the first time you needed to activate the non stick coating: how was this?

It was easy.

~ What recipes did you cook in your Fissler? How did the pan help?

I had enough stickers to buy the 28cm frying pan and was given the 16cm sauce pan to test, so I've cooked porridge and spaghetti hoops in the saucepan, and various chicken and pork dishes in the frying pan.
The frying pan cooked the meat and veg evenly (though we did almost accidentally burn some onions. That was our fault though).

~ Was your Fissler easy to clean or not? How did you clean it? Dishwasher or by hand?

Both the pans were very easy to clean, even the dried on spaghetti hoops, which is like cement. I cleaned them by hand (don't have a dishwasher).

~ How does the pan compare to your previous pans?

It compares favourably to my old tefal pans, although I noticed the base of the frying pan already has faint marks on the bottom from moving it from one hob to the other, which hasn't happened with my old ones, and I've been using them for 5 years.

~ Would you recommend Fissler products to friends and family if it came up in conversation? If so, why? If not, why not?

Yes, because they are cheap with the stickers and seem to be good quality.

~ Do you think you'll buy more from the range - by collecting the stickers from Tesco to get 70% off RRP?

Yes, I already have. smile

ComradeJing Tue 13-Aug-13 11:48:05

Non tester.

Don't put them in the dishwasher even if they say they are safe as it always ruins the non stick.

1/ Some things in life you can buy cheap and the product is fab. Pans are NOT one of those products.

2/ I find cleaning them, at least rinsing, straight after use means I spend less time scrubbing, the mess comes away really easily and therefore keeps the inside of the pan like new (ish).

MmeLindor Germany Tue 13-Aug-13 12:04:59

Non-tester. We got Fissler Profiline pots and pans as a wedding present from DH's German uncle. We are fast approaching our 16th wedding anniversary and the pots are like new.

I don't think that the non-stick frying pans last as long as the stainless steel pots, but even then the Fissler ones we had last a lot longer than cheaper ones, which tended to go wobbly.

When DD was a baby, I decided to save money and boil the dummies/bottles/teats in a pan rather than buy a steam steriliser. One day I forgot to turn the heat off, went for a walk and came home to a house full of acrid smoke. I thought the pan was a goner, but after a long soak, the molten plastic peeled off and the pan was as good as new.

Non-tester here. My tips for getting pans to last is to not let my DH use or clean good pans. He makes a habit of burning food onto any pan he uses then either makes a rely poor effort at cleaning it, so there's still food all over it when he puts it back in the cupboard, or he really goes to town with a scourer that's unsuitable. (this is the man who used a pan scourer to clean the bonnet of his own car, completely destroying the paintwork). It's just not worth it.

IsItWishfulThinking Tue 13-Aug-13 12:29:53

Non tester here too.
Top tip is to always ALWAYS soak the pot/pan after cooking, whatever you've cooked. Warm water with suds. Web leave overnight then you never have to scrub and it keeps pots longer.

If something has burn onto the pan, warm water and salt can get it off I soaked long enough.

LentilAsAnything Tue 13-Aug-13 13:18:35

Non-tester. I do have a large Fissler stockpot from when we lived in Germany, and it is serving me well.
I find it about as easy to clean as any other pot or pan, usually I soak the pan while we are eating, then wash up by hand as soon as we've finished our meal.
I probably won't buy more from the range as I have enough cookware to last me a good few years (hopefully forever).

I have some concerns about aluminium, Teflon, non-stick etc, and prefer plain steel, glass or cast iron.

lolancurly Tue 13-Aug-13 13:34:36

I am a non-tester. My advice is to by reasonable quality pans if you can afford to - we have purchased numerous cheaper frying pans over the years and this is really a false economy. One high quality frying pan would have outlived 10 of the cheap kind. Some pans, like a big preserving pan was expensive at around £45 but it is the kind of thing I will be using for the rest of my life, and as I am intending to live for a very long time, that is money well spent!

asuwere Tue 13-Aug-13 13:47:02

Non-tester. As others have said, spend as much as you can and get a decent set of pans and they will last. I am quite cheap but have realised that pots are one of the things that you have to invest in. Also, soak to make cleaning easier.

SnowyMouse England Tue 13-Aug-13 14:05:31

I'm a non-tester. Be careful what utensils you use with pans, metal can scratch.

dahville Tue 13-Aug-13 14:11:32

Non-tester - the best thing to preserve pans is not putting them in the dishwasher, rinse them right away after using and hand wash them.

RedKites Tue 13-Aug-13 14:43:36

Non tester - my top tip is to look for anodised aluminium - but the type that is dishwasher safe. I expect they would last even better if we handwashed them, but that would just lead to a pan not being used in our house (I guess would last a long time then!), so this is next best for us.

teabagpleb Tue 13-Aug-13 14:54:24

Non-tester. I've never found non-stick that lasts well, though some is really poor, so now I mostly use stainless steel pans which are great for rice, and last forever - I'm using three that my mum got for a wedding present. In 1958.

mousebacon Tue 13-Aug-13 15:41:46

Non-tester here. I find the best way to prolong the life of my pans is to eat out every night wink

aristocat Tue 13-Aug-13 15:44:38

Non-tester here too. My tip is simply to buy the best quality pans that you can and always follow the instructions on cleaning/ after care.

I never use anything that would damage a nonstick surface and soak before hand-washing if needed.

Have never tried these pans but keen to see what the reviews are like smile

MaxinePeakedistrict Tue 13-Aug-13 16:23:11

Non-tester.

We try to protect the non-stick lining by never putting one pan inside another for to scrape against. When stacking only put plastic items inside the pans. Also only use plastic utensils.

Frying pan leaflets often say only use at a medium heat but I find this a bit unrealistic. They never seem to last long.

Non-tester here - echoing what others say about buying the best pans you can afford and don't scrub the life out of them. We have a small but heavy cast iron le crueset frying pan that weighs a ton, is all blackened but has been going for donkeys years & looks set to outlive us all!

Gigaflops Tue 13-Aug-13 16:46:40

24cm frying pan tester -

First impression was how tiny the pan is!! My own fault I guess, for not looking at a measuring tape before ordering, but as I have a 29cm casserole dish which is HUGE I somehow thought the pan would be bigger!

Very heavy, good solid construction, easy to pre-treat before use...

I've done pancakes, scrambled egg, omelette and seared salmon so far - all without oil or butter, all slid off the pan like magic. Cleans up very easily (by hand, no dishwasher!)

No scratches yet (but I've been SUPER careful with the utensils) so it's holding up well. How it does when DP uses it will really be the test -he's much heavier on pans than I am and tends to pick up the closest spoon to stir, whether metal or plastic! Grrr!

We go through a LOT of non stick pans in this house... grin

Gigaflops Tue 13-Aug-13 16:47:50

Forgot to add, would definitely recommend as they're solidly made and don't seem capable of buckling (although time will tell).

I'm already collecting stickers for the bigger version... grin

Honu Tue 13-Aug-13 17:10:46

I looked at the Fissler pans in Tesco as I needed some but, despite searching everywhere on the packet, I couldn't find out if they worked on an induction hob. Nor could the Tesco staff tell me. So I didn't bother collecting the vouchers and will be looking elsewhere for pans. Shame.

is1 Tue 13-Aug-13 17:11:11

I'm a non-tester. My tip would be to be use the right utensils, e.g. a silicon whisk rather than a metal one when making white sauce. This way you won't scratch them and they will last so much longer. I find that once they have been scratched they deteriorate quite quickly.

DoubleMum Tue 13-Aug-13 17:50:34

Non-tester. I'd say don't put your expensive non-stick pan in the dishwasher and then be upset when it isn't how it's meant to be anymore. Naming no names, obviously.

Tee2072 Tue 13-Aug-13 19:01:29

Honu, somewhere it says they don't work on induction.

Tee2072 Tue 13-Aug-13 19:02:45

Sorry, forgot my tip!

Buy quality, as others have said, and treat it well. No dishwasher, non scratch cleanser etc

AtYourCervix Croatia Tue 13-Aug-13 19:08:16

Non-tester but bought a wok today with the tesco tokens.

Couldn't find any instructions in english at all so haven't 'activted' my non-stick. How do I do that?

ILoveAFullFridge Tue 13-Aug-13 19:19:37

Non-tester.

If you cook on gas, never let the flame be bigger than the base of the pan. Not only does this waste gas, but it will ruin your handles, especially if they are bolted directly onto the pan, rather than into a metal socket.

Stainless steel wire wool is more expensive than ordinary wire wool, but doesn't rust, lasts longer, and doesn't pierce your washing-up gloves. It's brilliant on pan bases and badly marked or burnt insides, but only use it lightly on the sides as it can mark some steel pans.

Burnt food traces can be removed after a good scrub by leaving vinegar in the pan overnight.

Silicone or wood tools only.

Happiestinwellybobs Tue 13-Aug-13 19:30:37

I received the frying pan. First impressions were that it was a good size and solid, however the handle was already loose. Easy tightened with a screwdriver.

Before you used the Fissler pan for the first time you needed to activate the non stick coating: how was this?

Really simple. I followed the instructions which were clear.

What recipes did you cook in your Fissler? How did the pan help?

I've done sausages in it. Also used it to do a couple of stir fry dishes. The size was good, the food cooked evenly. I was really careful with the utensils so as not to scratch the pan.

Was your Fissler easy to clean or not? How did you clean it? Dishwasher or by hand?

Cleaned it by hand, absolutely fab. Really easy to clean.

How does the pan compare to your previous pans?

Apart from the initial issue with the loose handle, the pan feels really solid. The depth of the pan allows for more varied use than my current frying pan.

Would you recommend Fissler products to friends and family if it came up in conversation? If so, why? If not, why not?

Yes. I already have.

Do you think you'll buy more from the range - by collecting the stickers from Tesco to get 70% off RRP?

Yes - got my eye on the large casserole pan first. I have had to prompt cashiers for stickers as they haven't been offered to me.

WholeLottaRosie Tue 13-Aug-13 19:32:54

Definitely buy the best you can afford. It sounds like a boring thing to spend money on but if you buy inferior quality pans you will replace them several times over your lifetime.
A well-known kitchen shop sells pan separators so you can stack pans inside each other without fear of scratching the non-stick.

Use wooden spoons and flexible rubber spatulas only - metal spoons kill pots!

iklboo Tue 13-Aug-13 21:47:57

I received the wok pan. First impressions were that it was solid, nice weight & sturdy feel.

Before you used the Fissler pan for the first time you needed to activate the non stick coating: how was this?

Very easy to do.

What recipes did you cook in your Fissler? How did the pan help?

Char Sui pork stir fry, chicken & noodles, beef in oyster sauce. The pan was great for the job. Nice deep pan with plenty of room for the ingredients and to stir them round.

Was your Fissler easy to clean or not? How did you clean it? Dishwasher or by hand?

Washed it by hand. Really quick & easy to clean.

How does the pan compare to your previous pans?

The pan feels more sturdy & solid than my current ones. Nice deep sides are perfect for the job & it cleans so well.

Would you recommend Fissler products to friends and family if it came up in conversation? If so, why? If not, why not?

Yes I definitely would.

Do you think you'll buy more from the range - by collecting the stickers from Tesco to get 70% off RRP?

Yes - we're collecting already for the grill pan and hope to collect the full set.

flamingtoaster Tue 13-Aug-13 23:05:56

Non-tester. I cook from scratch all the time and buy good quality saucepans as I find I wear them out very quickly if I don't. I always soak them before washing and tend to use mostly stainless steel/Le Cruset rather than non-stick. If anything is really stuck then I leave it to soak with biological washing powder and that solves the problem.

lagoonhaze Tue 13-Aug-13 23:20:09

Non tester.

My tip. Throw away metals because Apparently if they are in the holder they can be used on any pan!

DearPrudence Tue 13-Aug-13 23:24:27

Non-tester here looking for advice (hope that's ok)

I've got the frying pan on the Tesco offer and have thrown away the packaging. Can anyone tell me how you 'activate the non-stick coating'? Had no idea this was a thing! confused

firawla Wed 14-Aug-13 02:50:54

non tester, i have seen these fissler around and meaning to try them out, especially after getting the tesco stickers to collect for them! my tip is to buy good quality as they last longer

curlew Wed 14-Aug-13 08:54:36

Non tester here. I have had Fissler pans for 10 years now- bought them in a sale at the Elizabeth David Cookshop. I use them on my diesel powered range which sometimes gets super hot and they still look like new with no particular effort on my part (I am a slattern!) . They go from hob to oven (essential for cooking on a range) and cook really evenly. Money well spent.

MadMonkeys Wed 14-Aug-13 09:19:57

Non tester - my tips are the same as lots of posters have already said: buy good quality pans, soak after use and don't wash in dishwasher. Cheap non stick pans just don't last ime.

Spirael Japan Wed 14-Aug-13 09:22:32

Non-tester. I'd like to see more medium/large saucepans with a helper-handle on the far side. Especially when the pans themselves are heavy.

When I'm boiling a lot of pasta or potatoes I can't carry the pan to the sink and drain it one handed. It's awkward (and feels dangerously unstable) to use two hands on the one handle.

Tiggles Wed 14-Aug-13 10:12:04

Still very pleased with the pan - despite putting it through the dishwasher it is working fine on the non-stick. I don't have hot water in the house, so it is a faff to boil a kettle to wash a pan.
I would definitely recommend it to friends/family.

As a PP says they are quite small, I thought I must have requested the 24cm one by mistake, but mine must be the 28cm, but are deep, so no problem in cooking for 5 in it.

lovestogarden Wed 14-Aug-13 10:29:03

Non-tester - I have to stack pans as I have little space. I use a folded napkin inside the pan to stop scratches and metal spoons are banned - I only wooden cooking implements.

Wash by hand and soak for a good while so that you aren't chipping food off!

Steffanoid Wed 14-Aug-13 11:44:48

non-tester here, best tips for keeping pans lasting is do not let your dp who is rather good at sticking to the pan do the cooking with your good pans!

lovestogarden Wed 14-Aug-13 11:49:45

And don't let the kids try to make toffee in them.

prakattack Wed 14-Aug-13 11:55:55

Non-tester here. Does "Don't let DH anywhere near them!" count as a tip?! He's awful at scraping bottoms of pans and not soaking them so bits need scraping off afterwards!

Being serious, I'd agree with all the PP who said spend as much as you can afford - you really do get what you pay for. And then be very careful with utensils, washing up etc. I've never put pans in the dishwasher either, I'm surprised so many people do though not quite sure why...

choccyp1g Portugal Wed 14-Aug-13 12:02:06

Buy the best you can afford and always use plastic spatulas.
Never cut up an omelette in the pan !

UserError Wed 14-Aug-13 12:07:35

Non tester here. My tips are:

Never make homemade caramel! It's just not worth the damage it does to the pan. Use melamine or plastic utensils, never metal. Soak pans straight away after use. Spend as much as you can afford on pans in the first place as cheap ones are just false economy.

lovestogarden Wed 14-Aug-13 12:25:24

Don't let your mother boil eggs.

She can make soufflé, bake a complete wedding cake, cook Christmas dinner for 20, but can she boil an egg without forgetting the pan is on the gas and exploding the eggs? No she cannot.

OhWesternWind Wed 14-Aug-13 14:53:05

Non-tester here too.

Pan preservation tips are to always rinse/soak straight away and if there is some real burnt-on mess in the bottom then boil the pan up with some water and biological washing powder in - will lift it off a treat.

Fillybuster Wed 14-Aug-13 14:58:48

Non tester here.

Buy good quality saucepans to start with. It feels like a huuuuuge investment at the time (honestly, I still can't believe what my pans cost....) but 12 years on and they are all (almost) immaculate. And I used them hard!

I suspect this may be down to a combination of innate quality, and the fact that I take enormous care of them as I know I'll never be able to afford new ones....grin

nextphase Wed 14-Aug-13 15:01:13

Non tester:
If you do weld burn things on to the pan, don't scrape it off. Soak, and if needs be, warm the water back up on the hob, and let the carbon come off with a plastic spatula. If you dent the bottom, its game over.

Glitterfairys Wed 14-Aug-13 15:06:11

Non - tester but my top top to preserve pans is to use wooden /silicone spatulas as if you use metal cooking utensils you scratch the pan and it won't last as long as it should.

Babycarmen Wed 14-Aug-13 15:12:43

Non-tester - My best preservation tips are don't buy really cheap pans - they are usually cheap for a reason and the more expensive ones are worth the money usually, they last longer and if you are a keen cook they are an investment! Also, follow the care instructions! Very important! Try not to put in the dishwasher, even if they are suitable for dishwasher use, it does age them. And make sure you use the right utensils when cooking smile

MrsHoarder Wed 14-Aug-13 15:28:53

Non-tester.

Always put a splash of water in the pan with the lid on once they're empty. Keeps the inside damp until it gets washed up. And get DH to hand wash them.

starfishmummy Wed 14-Aug-13 15:35:02

Non tester.
Match your pan to the job - or rather to the hob size. Not only does it waste energy if you stick a small lan on ayour biggest gas ring, but flames licking up the side of the lan are not going to do it any favours. Charred wooden (amhik) or melted plastic handles don't look good and may no longer be safe

Non tester

I have a stainless steel frying pan, always seal it with oil before using it, not sure what these pans are but really need some new pans so watching with interest off to Google them now.

Witchesbrewandbiscuits Wed 14-Aug-13 17:03:36

non tester

top tip - 1 wash with the soft side of a sponge in warm soapy water and rinse

2- only use plastic or wooden utensils to stir etc.

lorka Wed 14-Aug-13 17:10:03

Non tester although I wish I was!!
To prolong the lifetime of my pans I always hand wash them and use wooden utensils.
I am saving up the Tesco vouchers for the Fissler pans so looking forward to trying them out for myself.
smile

I would also say you get what you pay for so. Buy the best you can afford.
I have a pan that was a wedding gift to my late grandparents, so....66 years ago.

Hmm just figured out that my auntie (their eldest) is 66, married in march, aunties birthday is beginning of sept.....no judgement granny grin

lissieloo Wed 14-Aug-13 18:43:39

I'm a non-tester too. And I second the buy the best you can afford. Also, tighten the screws up regularly to avoid tipping a full pan of boiling pasta over your (thankfully welly-clad) feet when the handle comes off.

A non-tester here but I have some tips.

Agreed to buy the best you can afford.

Pots and saucepans should never be filled to more than two thirds full.
If you are deep frying, only fill the pan up to one third full.
If you have stubborn greasy stains then rub a paste of baking soda and water on the pan/pot. Leave for thirty minutes then rinse and dry it.

StepAwayFromTheEcclesCakes Wed 14-Aug-13 19:51:03

I have no tips, that's why i wanted a pan to try sad

poachedeggs Wed 14-Aug-13 20:30:38

Non-tester here.

I use stainless steel as I've yet to find non-stick pans that stay that way.

I soak them after use, in soda crystals if they are really bad, and if they are appallingly burnt I boil a solution of soda crystals in them.

I only use nylon scouring pads as I find steel wool scratches pans and makes them stickier.

Hopezibah Wed 14-Aug-13 20:34:53

Non-tester. Our tips would be to coat the pan in a little oil before using it and even if it says safe for dishwasher or safe for metal utensils, still DON'T do these things - that way the pans should last longer.

sabretiggr Wed 14-Aug-13 20:36:13

don't put pans straight in the wash from when they are hot. Sometimes (even really good pans) could get warped / bent out of shape by doing this. Let them cool down a bit first.

GetKnitted Wed 14-Aug-13 21:05:10

Pan rules in my house: no metal cutlery in any pans, no scourers, not putting hot pans in cold water and I wish I could add 'no burning stuff'

BustyDeLaGhetto Wed 14-Aug-13 21:43:42

I am testing the Fissler 20cm frying pan and I LOVE IT.

Lovely, lovely lovely non-stickiness.

I am a little bit too aware of not scratching it so just washing in hot soapy water with a cloth.

So far have toasted some pine nuts and cooked some hallumi. God, I love hallumi. No hallumi scrapings on the bottom of my pan. Hooray!

Easy to clean, lovely to look at.

I would recommend this to anyone who asked and have in fact shown it off to anyone who happened to be passing including a neighbour and a cat.

I have passed my stickers onto a friend who is collecting them - the only problem I have with non-stick cookware is the idea that you are using a chemically coated product sad

bamblolo Wed 14-Aug-13 22:56:32

Non tester here would have loved to try these. My tip is to always buy good quality pans. I never use metal utensils to stir as this prevents the pans getting scratched. I always wash them in warm soapy water after use. My other tip is when buying any new pans try buying them in the sale as you will get some great pans for a great price.

hjmiller Thu 15-Aug-13 04:58:59

My best tip is to really be careful with the implements you use for cooking - it is NEVER worth risking metal tongs/fish-slice/spoon/etc on a non-stick surface!

MoogDroog Thu 15-Aug-13 07:01:36

Non tester here, but I would say buy good quality pans to start with (although I've found it's rarely worth spending a fortune on non-stick frying pans) and take your time to clean them afterwards, inside and out. Be careful with the utensils you use too - some can scratch!

rightsaidthread Thu 15-Aug-13 08:40:21

Non tester. Collecting tokens to get some from Tescos so reading with interest.

Can only reiterate what others have said in that we have only bought good quality pans as we are a large family cheap pots and pans just do not last long enough for us.

I always clean them by hand straight after use.

BlackeyedSusan England Thu 15-Aug-13 09:38:42

non tester. do not store smallerr saucepans in bigger saucepans. they tke off the non stick around the top of the bigger one

My best tip for keeping your saucepans in good nick is not to let flatmates near them with forks despairs

New teflon pots + stirring sauce with a metal fork= bye bye teflon

I was sent the griddle pan to test

Before you used the Fissler pan for the first time you needed to activate the non stick coating: how was this? It was very easy to do

What recipes did you cook in your Fissler? How did the pan help? I cooked chicken breasts, it cooked them quickly and evenly. And it made lovely crispy bacon. It didn't leave griddle lines though, which was a bit diappointing

Was your Fissler easy to clean or not? How did you clean it? Dishwasher or by hand? Very easy to clean, quick dip in the sink and a wipe with a cloth. Wouldn't put it in the dishwasher

How does the pan compare to your previous pans? Seems very sturdy and long lasting

Would you recommend Fissler products to friends and family if it came up in conversation? If so, why? If not, why not? I would, it seems to be a decent pan, and the non-stick truly is non-stick

Do you think you'll buy more from the range - by collecting the stickers from Tesco to get 70% off RRP? i am considering it

BellaVida Thu 15-Aug-13 16:34:54

Non-tester. My tips are:-
- Use good quality pans. Take advantage of offers and promotions. I got my current set with the last Tesco promotion.
-Ensure you keep your hob in good clean condition as this can also damage the bases.
- use the right pan for the right job.
- Use plastic or wooden utensils to avoid scratching.
- Let the pan cool slightly then soak to remove almost all of the residue, then you don't need to scrub.
-Never use abrasive sponges, brushes or cleaning products.

babybearsmummy Thu 15-Aug-13 17:15:42

Hiya, another non-tester! Best tips for preserving pans:
1) buy good quality/ trusted names, that way you're ensuring your pans will last longer anyway
2) rinse as soon as you've used it (don't let food/ fat dry into it)
3) wash as soon as possible after using to get rid of any food and grease, dry straight away
4) don't wash non stick or frying pans with scourers as it scrapes off all the non stick coating!

Elainey1609 Thu 15-Aug-13 17:18:00

Non tester

I say buy good quality pans in the first place then try not use metal utensils on them
I also soak them straight away and only hand wash them

I will be looking at these fissler pan though they look great from the write ups

SisterMatic Thu 15-Aug-13 22:13:04

Non tester-
Buy quality pans, the best you can afford
Don't use anything too abrasive to clean them to avoid damaging the coating.
don't burn stuff. Im looking at you, DP <glares>

lottietiger Thu 15-Aug-13 22:33:57

Non tester..
I never put my pans in the dishwasher & if possible buy a heavy based stainless steel with no non stick coating to come off. I will always soak pans after use, they go straight from the worktop to the sink with warm water & suds, at least while we are eating, if a stubborn product then until the following morning when the food lifts straight off without scrubbing.

frowner Thu 15-Aug-13 22:56:53

Non tester. Use cola to clean any burnt pans. Leave to soak overnight.

mistlethrush Fri 16-Aug-13 12:07:52

Non tester

Do get some good silicone implements to use in them.

Don't let your mother in law stay as she'll continuously stack pans inside each other...

iklboo Fri 16-Aug-13 14:01:53

Got all the stickers we need for the griddle pan now. Off to tesco tomorrow to pick it up.

I received the 28cm frying pan and have to say I'm delighted.

It was very easy to activate the non stick coating.

We have cooked various things but the two things that jump out, usually as they are culinary disasters, were paella and French toast. It cooked all paella evenly with nothing sticking, it was delicious. With the French toast, I could make two slices at a time and no sticking again. My husband hasn't complained about my cooking abilities, or lack of, since having received the pan smile

I wash by hand and this washed so easily even the following morning for the paella once!

I will definitely be purchasing more from the range.

GetStuffezd Sat 17-Aug-13 12:14:30

Non-tester here. Before I really got into cooking I just bought the cheapest pots and pans I could. However, in order to do a big dinner party I had to buy a big casserole pot and splashed out on a £30 one. Oh my god, the difference. It's really heavy-bottomed and durable. I don't use it for stewing, I use it for frying, slow cooking, rice, pasta.
Since then I've tried to buy a decent pan whenever I have a bit of spare cash. I'm slowly building up a good collection.

My advice for keeping pans in good condition would be to wash as soon as you've used them, invest in decent quality if you can, and never use metal utensils.

Lilyloo Sat 17-Aug-13 20:50:06

I have some really cheap pans that we bought when we moved in here ten years ago.
I have dishwashed them and they are scratched and the handles get hot and i hate them.
I would really love to get a new set of pans , i never really thought about buying individual and building up a set.
I did buy lots of pampered chef stoneware and a casserole dish to replace all my pyrex ovenware and they have been brilliant i really do need to think about my pans.

ThatLightbulbMoment Germany Sun 18-Aug-13 08:33:46

I received the 24cm stock pot

~ Before you used the Fissler pan for the first time you needed to activate the non stick coating: how was this?

I didn't actually realise you were supposed to, I didn't see anything in the instructions though so perhaps as it is not a non-stick pan you don't have to?

~ What recipes did you cook in your Fissler? How did the pan help?

I've done a couple lots of soup and a casserole and pasta. The pan is good, fairly heavy, but I can't say it cooked the food any better than my other pan did which cost less than £10.

~ Was your Fissler easy to clean or not? How did you clean it? Dishwasher or by hand?

Yes, easy to clean. I hand wash as it keeps your pans good for longer.

~ How does the pan compare to your previous pans?

I wouldn't say it's any better than pans I've had before. The RRP for the one I got is £99.99 (I nearly fainted at the price) and I don't think it's worth so much. The other pan I have of a similar size was less than £10 and is still going strong after 8 years. It's definitely good though.

~ Would you recommend Fissler products to friends and family if it came up in conversation? If so, why? If not, why not?

I would recommend, but with a warning about price. I really don't think that just shy of £100 is good value when you can get something just as good for much much less. It is a very good pan, and sturdy and I can tell it will last a long time so I would pass that on to friends.

~ Do you think you'll buy more from the range - by collecting the stickers from Tesco to get 70% off RRP?

No. Mostly because I very rarely shop at tesco so I won't have the chance to collect the stickers!!

Doubtfuldaphne Sun 18-Aug-13 09:29:15

Non tester here, my tip is to get the best quality you can afford and it will last a life time. Don't use knives or metal utensils on non stick pans!

KenDoddsDadsDog Chile Mon 19-Aug-13 10:39:47

Well, after some very long days at work I finally got to use my pan this weekend for some lovely lamb shanks!
I received a casserole dish with lid.

Before you used the Fissler pan for the first time you needed to activate the non stick coating: how was this?

Easy , jut followed the instructions

~ What recipes did you cook in your Fissler? How did the pan help?

I made some lamb shanks which I would usually cook in a pyrex dish. It was easier in the Fissler as I could brown everything off before going in the oven. I also liked the size of the pan . Can't wait to use it for some proper winter dishes.

~ Was your Fissler easy to clean or not? How did you clean it? Dishwasher or by hand?

I washed it by hand as I have a record of ruining non stick in the dishasher !

~ How does the pan compare to your previous pans?

I really like it - it's very sturdy and easy to grip getting out of the oven.
~ Would you recommend Fissler products to friends and family if it came up in conversation? If so, why? If not, why not?

Yes !

~ Do you think you'll buy more from the range - by collecting the stickers from Tesco to get 70% off RRP?

I will definitely as we have a brand new Tesco. I collected the Alessi offer which as also amazing value for money.

Pascha Mon 19-Aug-13 12:36:13

Non tester here.

I have just ordered a big frypan and the wok with my stickers, collecting them tomorrow sometime I hope.

My tips?

*Use the right size hob for the pan so the heat matches the base.
*Don't leave stuff congealing, put water in to soak it off.
*non-stick pans with a teatowel or something between each one to save scratching the surface.
*Don't give out your lovely pan to the baby to bash with a spoon, save the old cruddy one for that.

plusonemore Mon 19-Aug-13 13:02:17

Large frying pan tester here. We've been on holiday do only used once, will add more when I've used it more!

Firstly love the look and feel, its a good weight and feels good quality.
It was easy to activate the non stick coating, except for getting the water to boil without a lid- I had to put a baking sheet over for a while to get the temperature up.

So far I've only used the pan for frying onion, meat etc for a shepherds pie. The non stick was excellent, no oil required at all. it coped with browning two packs of mince without boiling it!

Cleaning was easy, I washed it by hand but everything cleaned perfectly.

It certainly seems to be the best non stck frying pan I've had, but it depends how well the non stick lasts. I would really like a lid for it however, as it is deep enough to do things like spag bol in.

I would recommend it to family or friends although I won't be buying any more- thats just because I already have other similar pans.

Thanks for the opportunity to test, will add more feedback later.

littlemonkeychops Mon 19-Aug-13 16:50:05

I definitely agree with all the posters above who say you get what you pay for, invest in good quality and it'll last - buy cheap pay twice :-)

I always put things in to soak asap after cooking, makes them sooooo much easier to clean.

And yy to sticking with plastic/wooden utensils.

Theimpossiblegirl Mon 19-Aug-13 21:13:13

My top tip is to not let your DH use one of your nice pans to do onions on the BBQ. It's ruined.

Tip 2, it's worth investing in quality. I am currently buying a decent pan/dish once a month to get a good collection.

tinypumpkin Mon 19-Aug-13 21:42:19

non tester here too. I agree about not washing pans in the dishwasher and also investing in the best quality pans that you can afford.

IwishIwasmoreorganised Tue 20-Aug-13 13:59:29

~ Before you used the Fissler pan for the first time you needed to activate the non stick coating: how was this? Fine, easy to follow instructions made it very straightforward.

~ What recipes did you cook in your Fissler? How did the pan help? I've only had chance to use it once so far. Pan fried some pork steaks then made a sauce in it. The meat cooked beautifully and the sauce was fine. it was very easy to clean afterwards too.

~ Was your Fissler easy to clean or not? How did you clean it? Dishwasher or by hand? See above - yes easy as nothing stuck. I washed it by hand as the instructions seemed to advise against using the dishwasher unless it could be dried quickly (ours usually goes on overnight).

~ How does the pan compare to your previous pans? Nice, but much heavier.

~ Would you recommend Fissler products to friends and family if it came up in conversation? If so, why? If not, why not? I need to use. It more first.

~ Do you think you'll buy more from the range - by collecting the stickers from Tesco to get 70% off RRP? Yes, I've got loads collected, just need to get to a store before they run out like they did with the Pyrex things!

ICutMyFootOnOccamsRazor Tue 20-Aug-13 19:33:27

Non-tester (sadly sad).

We don't have much room, so we have to store our frying pans on top of each other - we use kitchen towel between them to stop them getting scratched, and only ever use silicone utensils on the 2 non-stick ones.

All our other pots and pans are stainless, and you can honestly do anything to them - they're destruction-proof.

WheresMyCow Wed 21-Aug-13 09:22:39

Non tester here.

Don't scrimp on your pans. We got bought some really good ones over 10 years ago and they are still fantastic now after lots of use.

I use a big non stick stir fry type pan a lot and only use a silicon utensil in it and it gets washed pretty much straight away. It will last because it's good quality

rockinmum Wed 21-Aug-13 15:50:35

Non tester here too.

I usually rub a banana skin on any hard to remove residue (usually from DH's cooking), leave it for 30 minutes and voila no more residue.

AlexReidsLonelyBraincell Wed 21-Aug-13 20:56:53

I tested the 24cm stockpot.

Before you used the Fissler pan for the first time you needed to activate the non stick coating: how was this?

Straightforward, the instructions were simple and easy to follow. It didn't take long.

What recipes did you cook in your Fissler? How did the pan help?

I cooked - Meatballs in a tomato sauce and a vegetable curry. The pan is huge which is great as I like to batch cook. I've previously only used taller stockpots but I liked the broad base/shorter style, I felt there was less chance of burning due to the bigger surface area.

Was your Fissler easy to clean or not? How did you clean it? Dishwasher or by hand?

Washed by hand, I simmered boiling water in the pan post-curry and it washed up very well.

How does the pan compare to your previous pans?

As mentioned previously I liked the broader base of this pan, it's nice and solid. I've used a taller stockpot in the past but had to be careful to keep stirring due to the bottom burning, whether I was paying more attention due to testing I'm not sure, but I felt I needed to do this less.

Would you recommend Fissler products to friends and family if it came up in conversation? If so, why? If not, why not?

Yes, they're good solid products that are easy to maintain. I like that they go easily in the dishwasher too. Though did not use that method to clean it - it fits in easily though.

Do you think you'll buy more from the range - by collecting the stickers from Tesco to get 70% off RRP?

Yes, I'm currently saving for the griddle pan, not sure I would pay the RRP, I'd sooner buy Le Creuset or similar, however at the discounted price they are well worth the money. Thank you for the extra vouchers.

Thank you for the opportunity to try this product, I love to cook so it was a fun product test for me. grin

AWeeBitConfused Wed 21-Aug-13 22:24:23

Sorry for my late feed back I was busy with getting my kids ready for going back to school. I tested the 20cm casserole with lid.

Before you used the Fissler pan for the first time you needed to activate the non stick coating: how was this?

I was a little confused because the leaflet that came with the pan had nothing about activating the non stick coating so I wasn't sure if I needed to do it. However I thought it was better to be safe than sorry and the instructions in the e-mail were easy to follow.

What recipes did you cook in your Fissler? How did the pan help?

I cooked a bolognaise with bacon, a beef casserole and mince. The pan felt good and solid and it heated up really quickly. The non stick was brilliant.

Was your Fissler easy to clean or not? How did you clean it? Dishwasher or by hand?

I put everything in the dishwasher but by the looks of this thread I'm in the minority confused The pan did not clean as well as I would of liked there is still black bits in the pan that just won't come off but then maybe if I had hand washed it things would of been different.

How does the pan compare to your previous pans?

I have gas hobs and even on the smallest ring on the lowest flame it was impossible to get the pan to stay at a simmer once it had heated up it stayed at a really high temperature. My dh can sometimes be called to an emergency so I like to just keep the food warm for a little while on the hob if he won't be too much longer then the time he was due home but that was not possible because the dinner would of boiled away to nothing.

Would you recommend Fissler products to friends and family if it came up in conversation? If so, why? If not, why not?

Yes I would while the sticker promotion is running it is a good quality pan for that price, but at the full RRP no I think you can get better pans for the full price.

Do you think you'll buy more from the range - by collecting the stickers from Tesco to get 70% off RRP?

Yes there is a couple that I have my eye on.

cherrybath Thu 22-Aug-13 18:16:52

Non tester
I agree with Moogdroog - I've never found non-stick frying pans that were very good, even expensive ones. The surfaces just don't last as long as those in saucepans, presumably because of higher cooking temperatures. I only use non-stick for pancakes, omelettes, sauces and scrambled egg and don't really see the point of a non-stick surface in an ordinary pan.
We use a 26cm black satin cast iron "shallow casserole" (a.k.a. saute pan) for almost everything, deeper than a frying pan so you can use it for cooking like a saucepan. Also stainless steel pans (casserole style again, with two short handles) which go easily into deep kitchen drawers and can be dishwashed.
Agree with everyone who says spend a decent amount on your pans and NEVER put non-stick in the dishwasher.

Non-tester here, i have a few ather pricey non-stick pans, i have never had any trouble cleaning them and for a family of 5 that's quite something! After use always rinse excess food asap and for heavy duty stuck on food bits steep in hot water for 10 minutes with a little squirt of fairy liquid and they are perfect x

Non tester here. I used to get through masses of cheap pans of all sorts and actually bought cheap frying pans on purpose because they would get thrown away after a year or so.
Then for a wedding present we got a VERY expensive large frying pan and after 7 years of heavy use (we cook almost every day and prob use this pan 2 or 3 times a week) it looks like new.
My tip then, buy the best you can afford, even if it means collecting decent cookware over years rather than buying all at once. I really enjoy cooking buts having good tools makes a huge difference as with any job.

racingheart Thu 22-Aug-13 19:56:54

Non tester here. My tip is only ever stir with wooden or silicon spoons. Metal and plastic can scratch the surface and ruin the non stick. DH also swears by washing pans by hand, but life's too short. I'd rather buy new pans from time to time.

biffsmom Thu 22-Aug-13 20:24:29

Non tester here - my tips are not to store things inside your pans and to rinse them/clean them as soon as possible after use.

NulliusInBlurba Thu 22-Aug-13 20:40:10

Non-tester here BUT our main set of pans are from Fissler (we're in Germany). We paid a comparatively large amount for them and as far as I was concerned they were my 'pots for life'. Now recently, after about 8 years use, the handle has come off the lid of the largest saucepan (it's also the lid for the normal frying pan). I'm peeved to say the least. Anyone from Fissler reading this? We never put the pans in the dishwasher, obviously, never seriously abused them, so why did the blardy handle fall off? It's not the kind of thing you can superglue back on.

Apart from this, ahem, malheur, the pans are great. What I like best about them is the depth of the base and the fact that they ALWAYS come clean.

borisscoo Thu 22-Aug-13 20:56:46

Non-tester

As one of the last households in the country without a dishwasher, absolutely nothing gets dishwashered in my house and even cheap items seem to have a longer shelf life.

With regards to pans, I rinse under running water immediately they've been used to reduce the amount of scrubbing required. Over night soaking for stubborn stuff is essential.

miluth Thu 22-Aug-13 20:59:15

Non-tester

I think quality really does matter when it comes to buying pans to ensure they last. I never use metal utensils on non-stick pans as it only ends up scratching the coating off and don't use harsh scouring sponges when cleaning them or put them in the dishwasher. I never have the gas too high as it can damage the outer sides of the pans if the flames are coming around the side.

VirtuallyThere Thu 22-Aug-13 21:06:35

Non tester. Buy lovely shiny expensive pan, display proudly in cupboard, use tarnished pan you've used for years! Else soft sponges to wash and avoid sharp utensils that may scratch it.

Non-tester with a tip here. If you accidentally forget about a pan of carrots and the pan gets a teensy bit burnt, boiling some Coke in the pan will help to breakdown the black residue and make cleaning (and saving) the pan a lot easier!

amadan10 Thu 22-Aug-13 22:32:37

Non-tester. I always soak pans before washing. I prefer stainless steel but have not tried non-stick since the early days of teflon. Perhaps I should give it another go. I use Astonish Orange Cleaning Paste to keep the base of my pans sparkling.

chrismse Thu 22-Aug-13 22:51:57

Non-tester here, correct storage lets you pans have a longer life. Use a pan stand don`t just squeeze into a cupboard. If your pan is burn leave it soaking overnight in a little soap powder.

katiewalters Thu 22-Aug-13 23:38:46

buying quality pots and pans, as they will last longer. also not using abrasive materials to clean the pans and not using metal utensils in them

kittylover Fri 23-Aug-13 00:43:15

non tester I always buy the best pans i can afford. To keep the non stick quality i wash them before i start to use them then treat them with olive oil i do this by using some kitchen roll and rubbing it around the pan. When washing the pans i always use cleaning equipment that is recommended for use on non stick pans surfaces, after i have washed them i dry them well with a soft tea towel. After 4 uses of the pan i treat with oil to keep the non stick surface in tip top condition. When storing non stick pans i put a tea towel or piece of kitchen roll between each pan so that non of the pan surface gets scratched

mum2eci Fri 23-Aug-13 08:46:28

Non Tester - Always buy the best you can afford (false economy to buy cheap!).
Try to store your pans well, ie not piled inside of each other to avoid scratching! Follow the manufacturer guidelines for washing/use this also helps to ensure you're covered by the manufacturer guarantee. Always use the sponge side of the cleaning scourer pad to avoid scratching :-)

sc00ter Fri 23-Aug-13 09:37:04

Non Tester.

1. Buy good quality cook wear - I am a bit of a foodie and love cooking anything and everything. So to me this was very important.
I got a brand called Stella, which should have been expensive, however I bought them in a sale. They were at least half the original price and a I have had then about 8 years now. (still look like new) smile

2. I always use some warm soapy water and kitchen towel to wash off things like sauces, gravy first. Saves on sponges too...

3. Always use a non stick/ non abrasive sponge afterwards.

4. Oh and I am one of the naughty ones who stack my pans one inside the other. - But I have made some discs of material that i place inside each one to stop scratches, I have even made them larger so they overflow the sides so not to get the edges damaged.

5. Saucepan lids are kept attached inside my kitchen cupboard door. They sit inside this holder I bought from the betterwear book I think, for a couple of pounds.
So they are always there at hand when the door is opened.

Crocklebog Fri 23-Aug-13 19:28:25

Non tester. I always spend the maximum amount I can afford at the time on pans as I find it is a false economy otherwise.

SmileyShazza Fri 23-Aug-13 23:38:45

Non tester here - my advise would be to always use plastic utensils as they reduce the likelihood of scratching the delicate non stick surfaces on pans in comparison to using metal ones.

satas20 Sat 24-Aug-13 13:16:15

Non tester - store pans with kitchen towel in between to prevent scratches; hold masterclass in 'looking after the new pans or you won't be allowed to use them' with teenage sons; always wait for pan to cool before soaking - otherwise pan or non-stick can be damaged by sudden cooling of very hot pan.

IwishIwasmoreorganised Sun 25-Aug-13 20:03:41

Back from holiday now and I've used the large frying pan a couple more times.

Food cooks evenly, and I've not used any oil at all. Even fried eggs slid out like a dream!

I've washed it by hand each time but left it to drain because I'm lazy and that seems to work well.

I'm off to Tesco tomorrow to get a couple of other pans hopefully - not sure I'd pay full price for them though.

Theimpossiblegirl Sun 25-Aug-13 22:28:14

I have enough stickers for a large frying pan.
smile

snowymum12 Mon 26-Aug-13 07:58:49

Non-tester here. Definitely don't put them in the dishwasher. I've ruined my lovely pans that way. I would also recommend getting decent utensils to use in your pans as they can often scratch (or if they are plastic, melt) and destroy the non-stick coating.

DoubleMum Tue 27-Aug-13 11:00:43

I agree that to make them last you need to buy decent pans and wash them relatively carefully. Also not forgetting that you have boiled your rice until it's a black solid mass on the bottom of the pan also helps.

BooMeowson Tue 27-Aug-13 13:13:38

Non tester here for the small frying pan

~ Before you used the Fissler pan for the first time you needed to activate the non stick coating: how was this? I did not know I had to do this, must read instructions better!

~ What recipes did you cook in your Fissler? I have 2 big frying pans, I bought a little one to help cook small amounts of pancetta for pasta, and frying eggs etc. I find the non-stick excellent for these and it feels hardy like it will not scratch.

~ Was your Fissler easy to clean or not? Dishwasher and comes out brand new

~ How does the pan compare to your previous pans? Equivalent to my big Teflon non scratch one but much better than some cheap frying pans I've had over the years

~ Would you recommend Fissler products to friends and family Yes I would

~ Do you think you'll buy more from the range - by collecting the stickers from Tesco to get 70% off RRP? I'd like to own the wok as well but I don't have the room for any more pans!

christmas33 Tue 27-Aug-13 19:12:10

think they are good value and last well

christmas33 Tue 27-Aug-13 19:14:06

to keep pans clean and lasting buy a good name in the industry

Littlecherublegs Tue 27-Aug-13 19:56:30

Non tester:

My advice would be to buy the most expensive set of pans you can afford - it really pays in the long run.
I've purchased many a pan in my time and have had a range of issues including the non stick coating coming off, the handle getting burnt, pans going rusty, and pans easily becoming scratched.
Its definitely worth investing in a quality set to begin with.

smaths Tue 27-Aug-13 21:23:07

Non tester - I bought the small and largest frying pans

~ Before you used the Fissler pan for the first time you needed to activate the non stick coating: how was this? I only knew I had to do this from reading this thread, it really wasn't all that obvious in the instructions at all (at least I'm assuming that's what the whole rinsing the pan and then boiling water in it before wiping with a bit of oil was for? It never actually said in the instructions that was to activate the non stick)

~ What recipes did you cook in your Fissler? So far I have made pancakes in the little one, it's a perfect size for them and risotto in the larger one. The non stick is excellent.

~ Was your Fissler easy to clean or not? a quick rinse and a wipe and that was pretty much it!

~ How does the pan compare to your previous pans? my last pan was a tefal one that's lasted about 8 years before the non stick became sticky. These pans are heavier duty but I'm not sure the non stick is any more effective. I do miss the red spot thingy on the tefal though that let you know when it was up to temperature.

~ Would you recommend Fissler products to friends and family I showed it to my mum and recommended her to get one too - I would never in a million years pay full price for one though, I think they are still even a bit on the dear side with the stickers discount.

~ Do you think you'll buy more from the range - by collecting the stickers from Tesco to get 70% off RRP? I'm debating on also getting the griddle pan and the small saucepan. What I would have liked to have seen was a proper saucepan set with different sizes instead of random stock pot, casserole and milk pan size?

I tested the saucepan. Sorry for late review- school hol dramas!

~ Before you used the Fissler pan for the first time you needed to activate the non stick coating:
how was this?
I wasn't aware I had to do this- couldn't see anything in the instructions about it. blush

~ What recipes did you cook in your Fissler? How did the pan help?
~ Was your Fissler easy to clean or not? How did you clean it? Dishwasher or by hand?
I've made white sauce and bolognaise. Cleaned it in dishwasher-definitely easy. So nice to have a saucepan that's dishwasher friendly!

~ How does the pan compare to your previous pans?
It's much heavier, seems more durable and the handle is sturdy and easy to grip.

~ Would you recommend Fissler products to friends and family if it came up in conversation? If so, why? If not, why not?
If it came up, definitely, for the reasons I gave above.

~ Do you think you'll buy more from the range - by collecting the stickers from Tesco to get 70% off RRP?
Yes, I'm already saving- need 1 more to get another 2 pans!

lemony7 Wed 28-Aug-13 15:04:00

~ Before you used the Fissler pan for the first time you needed to activate the non stick coating: how was this?
My husband did this so it was super easy for me :D

~ What recipes did you cook in your Fissler? How did the pan help?
So far we've only used it to cook meat and eggs. It's been brilliant - no oil needed as nothing stuck to it!

~ Was your Fissler easy to clean or not? How did you clean it? Dishwasher or by hand?
Very easy to clean by hand.

~ How does the pan compare to your previous pans?
It's much heavier than our other pans but so far it's a lot better! I hope the quality is longstanding.

~ Would you recommend Fissler products to friends and family if it came up in conversation? If so, why? If not, why not?
Yes if they were after a quality pan.

~ Do you think you'll buy more from the range - by collecting the stickers from Tesco to get 70% off RRP?
We bought two initially but don't really need any more. If we needed them I would definitely buy one in the promotion (not full price, they're expensive).

Bubbles85 Thu 29-Aug-13 09:50:45

Non tester, but I bought the small frying pan

Before you used the Fissler pan for the first time you needed to activate the non stick coating: how was this?

I wasn't aware this had to be done. sad

What recipes did you cook in your Fissler? How did the pan help?

I cooked pancakes and bacon while on a campervan holiday. the pan was quick to heat up and was he right size for two of us.

Was your Fissler easy to clean or not? How did you clean it? Dishwasher or by hand?

Washed by hand in cool water due to the camping. It cleaned very quickly with no bits stuck to the bottom.

How does the pan compare to your previous pans?

It was a great size (my frying pan is larger) and the non-stick coating looked much better. I have always had cheaper pans in the past.

Would you recommend Fissler products to friends and family if it came up in conversation? If so, why? If not, why not?

Yes, they do the job they are designed to do and look great too!

Do you think you'll buy more from the range - by collecting the stickers from Tesco to get 70% off RRP?

Yes, I'm currently saving for the stock pots. If I only have enough vouchers for one, then I'll go for the larger one.

Happiestinwellybobs Sat 31-Aug-13 12:45:38

I have 8 stickers that I don't need. The lovely boy gave me loads this morning, so I've bought the stock pot and the griddle pan. PM me if you want them - happy to post them.

nerysw Sat 31-Aug-13 18:36:52

Non tester, from what I've been reading here I may have to get collecting at Tescos!

IwishIwasmoreorganised Sat 31-Aug-13 19:22:44

I'm chuffed to bits to have found out that I've won the £100 in Tesco vouchers prize draw grin.

I have got 15 spare tokens - if anyone wants wants them just PM me. First come first served!

danshu123 Mon 02-Sep-13 11:10:20

Hi I am new here, not sure how to do PM. But can I please have some of your spare tokens? Thanks

Fillybuster Mon 02-Sep-13 13:27:28

I've got 25-30 Tesco tokens - if anyone wants them, please PM me your details.

My Fissler pans are 12 years old and still in great condition. Was a bit disappointed that all the pans in the Tesco offer are quite small, as I fancied a really big new frying pan and a large stock pot sad

Happiestinwellybobs Mon 02-Sep-13 20:18:03

danshu123. Have PM'd you. Click on your inbox and should be there smile

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