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Warburtons' virtual roundtable feedback thread. Non testers: Share your thoughts on children's packed lunches and white bread for a chance to win a £150 JL voucher NOW CLOSED

(94 Posts)
KatieBMumsnet (MNHQ) Mon 23-Sep-13 17:15:04

This thread is for the 9 Mumsnetters taking part in the Warburtons virtual roundtable.

Here's what Warburtons say: "We've recently undertaken a piece of university research which looks at the role of packed lunches in children's diets. It's a hot-topic at the moment and we'd really like Mumsnetters with a child of primary school age to let us know your comments and thoughts around this research."

Non testers: Tell us what you think of children's packed lunches, do you find it difficult to know what to put in your DC's lunchbox? Or are your DCs happy to eat what they're given? What about white bread? Do your DC's eat white bread? If not, why is this?
Whatever your thoughts on packed lunches and white bread please let us know. Everyone who adds a comment to this thread will be entered into a prize draw where one winner will receive a £150 John Lewis voucher.

Testers: Below are a few feedback questions for you to answer - if you have any more comments, please feel free to add them to your response.

1. Before reading the research what was your perception of white bread?
2. Having looked at this research and key findings from Leeds university (based on a study of 2,500 children), have your perceptions changed at all? If so how? If not, why not?
3. Which, if any, of the key research findings really resonate with you and why?
4. Do you think white bread gets a bad reputation or not? Why do you think this is?
5. The research shows "children's bread consumption increases intakes of some nutrients which have been proven to be beneficial for long term health, including carbohydrate, starch, fibre, calcium, iron and selenium" how aware, if at all, of this were you before reading the research?
6. Do you give your DCs packed lunches for school? If so, how often, if at all does the packed lunch include a sandwich and which type of bread do they usually have? Do you think you're likely to change this after reading the research or not? If so why? If not why not?
7. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following: "Parents have a tough job when it comes to children's health and nutrition"? Please explain.

Every selected MNer who adds a comment to this thread will receive a £50 John Lewis voucher as a thank you.

Thanks,

MNHQ

gazzalw Mon 23-Sep-13 17:57:07

our two have grown up eating nothing but wholemeal and granary sliced bread so we feel as if we should polish our halos! However, because many of their school friends have white bread sandwiches they are always pestering for white bread. We have yet to cave in but it's frustrating! GRRR.

However, we do often have baguettes and French cheese, salad etc...at the weekends for a quick lunch and they love this type of meal!

Yes, finding inspiration for packed lunches is difficult. I always think their lunches tend to be quite bread/carbs heavy and not sure if this is entirely desirable. We do go down the wraps/pitta bread route quite often but still .....

Incidentally, I do still think that white bread is best for a bacon butty and indeed for toast with lashings of butter grin. Can't escape my working-class 1960s/70s roots!

Bubbles85 Mon 23-Sep-13 18:57:19

Have to agree on the above that its hard to get the kids to stick to brown bread when all their friends are having white!

I find google is great for lunchbox inspiration.

Chulita Mon 23-Sep-13 20:04:05

Tester
1) Before reading the research I thought white bread was wholemeal bread's poorer cousin with less nutritional benefit to be gained from eating it compared to wholemeal or granary.
2) The research hasn't changed my opinion mainly because I don't think the report addressed the issue of white bread vs wholemeal nutrition. It seemed to be more focused on bread of any type as opposed to no bread.
3) I was quite surprised that the results showed an adverse effect on meeting the DRVs for total fat and saturated fat. I understand that packaged bread is quite high in salt but I hadn't registered the saturated fat content.
4) I reckon white bread's reputation is deserved. In terms of macronutrients, carbohydrate and vitamin D etc it delivers but that doesn't mean it's great to eat 2 or 3 times a day every day. This report shows the excess fat and sodium that's consumed with a high bread diet (I think it's any bread rather than just white).
5) Bread consumption is bound to increase the intake of carbohydrates, fibre, calcium and iron since grain is full of carbohydrates and bread is fortified with extra bits and bobs. I was aware of the nutritional value of bread.
6) I make packed lunches for my DC and they tend to have bread most days. We have a bread machine so will make a 50/50 loaf with added seeds or I buy either wholemeal or 50/50 packaged bread (most of the time it's bought at the moment since we're moving house and I packed up my bread machine book too soon). I won't be changing the type of bread I buy because I'm happy with what I'm feeding them. To be honest I couldn't see where this report compared the different types of bread against each other, it seemed far more about whether bread was consumed or not. It wasn't even concentrating on how much bread was consumed, just how often and based on average consumption of usual types. I didn't think this report was particularly well focused. I might, of course, have completely mis-read it so I'll wait til a couple of others have responded and see if I'm just having a dense moment.
7) I agree with the comment because children are always changing what they like and what they'll put up with. They also have different energy needs to adults and process food differently. We are also given a lot of information to process and it's hard to sift out the information that's being sponsored by a food producer with an interest in a certain spin on the results released.

I'll pop back in a bit and see if anyone else has answered grin

DoctorGilbertson Mon 23-Sep-13 20:40:01

Tell us what you think of children's packed lunches, do you find it difficult to know what to put in your DC's lunchbox?

Yes, one will eat sandwiches, the other won't so usually gets crackers instead. Plus fruit and yoghurt. I don't usually vary them so not a lot of difficulty making a decision.

Or are your DCs happy to eat what they're given?

Well, I hope so. One of them asked for crisps the other day in his packed lunch. I changed the subject and think he has forgotten. Mostly they eat what they are given. Sometimes leftovers from the night before if I have any and they are packed lunch appropriate.

What about white bread?

I prefer it and it is cheaper so it is what we usually have in the house

Do your DC's eat white bread? If not, why is this?

Yes, even the one who doesn't eat sandwiches, although clearly less than the one who does.

littlemonkeychops Mon 23-Sep-13 20:40:20

Non-tester. DD has never had white bread as we only buy wholemeal. She's only 2 so i appreciate peer pressure might make her want to try it when she's older, but i still wouldn't buy it as i don't like it.

Me and DH grew up with pretty rubbish nutritionally packef lunches (think jam or processed meat white bread sandwiches, crisps, choc and maybe a yogurt). I'd like to do better for DD but i'm not sure where i'll get ideas for quick/easy but healthy options from.

DontmindifIdo Mon 23-Sep-13 20:48:02

Non-tester - DS prefers white bread, but generally isn't a big fan of sandwiches at all - toast, fine, bread in sandwich form, not so much. He does rather love wraps and wholemeal pitta bread, so he normally gets those if I have to do a packed lunch for him.

Personally, I do think that regardless of the health concerns, hot white toast with real butter melting on it is one of the best rainy afternoon treats. (white bread and real butter banned in my house growing up)

VivaLeThrustBadger Mon 23-Sep-13 20:57:49

Non tester.

Dd wouldn't eat bread for years which made pack ups and picnics a nightmare.

She will now eat white bread. I'd prefer it if she ate granary but I,m thankful she now eats any bread. She will eat the 50/50 stuff so I get that and hope its better than full white.

I try to balance the carbs of the bread out with some protein....so cheese or ham or chicken sandwich.

Mamafratelli Mon 23-Sep-13 20:59:25

Tester
1. Before reading the research what was your perception of white bread?
I have to admit that I saw white bread as something to avoid. I certainly wouldn't buy white bread on a regular basis, although I wouldn't eat a bacon sandwich on anything other than white bread.
2. Having looked at this research and key findings from Leeds university (based on a study of 2,500 children), have your perceptions changed at all? If so how? If not, why not?
My perceptions of bread on the whole have changed drastically. I have always tried to mix up the childrens lunchboxes so that they don't have bread every day but I won't do that anymore.
3. Which, if any, of the key research findings really resonate with you and why?
I was really surprised to see that the children eating bread twice a day actually met their nutrient targets more successfully than those who didn't eat bread and also received more energy.
4. Do you think white bread gets a bad reputation or not? Why do you think this is?
White bread has got a bad reputation. I think it is seen as empty calories with no goodness, like crisps and chips. Wholemeal bread is seen as much better.
5. The research shows "children's bread consumption increases intakes of some nutrients which have been proven to be beneficial for long term health, including carbohydrate, starch, fibre, calcium, iron and selenium" how aware, if at all, of this were you before reading the research?
To be honest I had always thought of bread as filling rather than nutritious focusing more on ensuring the fillings were healthy.
6. Do you give your DCs packed lunches for school? If so, how often, if at all does the packed lunch include a sandwich and which type of bread do they usually have? Do you think you're likely to change this after reading the research or not? If so why? If not why not?
My DCs take packed lunches to school 4 days out of 5. I have normally tried to give a mix of lunch options with sandwiches two or three days a week. I usually use Warburtons Squarish Wraps, flatbreads and I usually but Best of Both or 50/50 bread.
7. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following: "Parents have a tough job when it comes to children's health and nutrition"? Please explain.
I think that people get confusing messages of what is and isn't healthy for children. Mixed messages come from schools, health professionals and peers. I like my children to have a balanced diet with high fat, high energy foods allowed in smaller portions. I don't want to make food a battleground but allow them to try everything and decide what they like on their own.

CarmonEileen Mon 23-Sep-13 21:21:06

Tester..
1. Before reading the research what was your perception of white bread?
A) My perception was always white bread was for normal families and any other type was for better off/well to do blush

2. Having looked at this research and key findings from Leeds university (based on a study of 2,500 children), have your perceptions changed at all? If so how? If not, why not?
A) Absolutely, I don't think I realised how much 'goodness' was in there, also the statistics were surprising!

3. Which, if any, of the key research findings really resonate with you and why?
A) As Mama says above, the fact that a child eating bread twice a day met nutritional targets was quite a surprise, although the energy somewhat made me think differently.

4. Do you think white bread gets a bad reputation or not? Why do you think this is?
A) I didn't think it got a bad reputation, I do now. I think we are all now more aware of the benefits of wholemeal/brown/granary bread but children seem to dislike the textures or flavours that non white bread has.

5. The research shows "children's bread consumption increases intakes of some nutrients which have been proven to be beneficial for long term health, including carbohydrate, starch, fibre, calcium, iron and selenium" how aware, if at all, of this were you before reading the research?
A) I had no idea of the nutrients, to me it was just bread, My son eats bread and I know it fills him up whereas my daughter won't eat bread at all so she need filling up in other ways. I am now much more aware and shocked at how the stats add up.

6. Do you give your DCs packed lunches for school? If so, how often, if at all does the packed lunch include a sandwich and which type of bread do they usually have? Do you think you're likely to change this after reading the research or not? If so why? If not why not?
A) Both children have a packed lunch, My son has whatever I have bought, mostly Warburtons 50/50 his only dislike is Tiger bread. My daughter doesn't eat any at all, she doesn't like the texture of any bread. I have tried to tempt her with wraps, squares etc but she will not eat it.
We will most definately be buying wholemeal rather than plain white from here on in.

7. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following: "Parents have a tough job when it comes to children's health and nutrition"? Please explain
A) I agree, its not the easiest job in the world to find a good balance for the childrens health and nutrition, Products are too readily available to take the strain out of cooking/making from scratch these days, I find that my daughter always wants what other children have in their lunch boxes but when I give in she doesn't like or want!

ouryve Mon 23-Sep-13 21:33:35

1. Before reading the research what was your perception of white bread?

That white bread contains less fibre (not that wheat should be our primary source of fibre) and is lower in particular nutrients than white bread, particularly the B vitamins found primarily in the wheat husk. In my own experience, while some types of white bread might be quite delicious, it's not something I could eat regularly as it doesn't fill me up for long, yet conversely I end up bloated from it. DS1 has ASD and went through a long phase when he would only eat white bread and not even consider brown. The flour I used to make a lot of his bread was fortified with calcium and iron, which set my mind at rest, a little.

2. Having looked at this research and key findings from Leeds university (based on a study of 2,500 children), have your perceptions changed at all? If so how? If not, why not?

Other than the number of children who predominantly eat white bread, i found no information from this study that would change my opinions.

3. Which, if any, of the key research findings really resonate with you and why?

None of them are surprising. I was surprised by the earlier research referred to, stating that children who usually had a sandwich in their packed lunch had healthier diets, but that's influence by my own behaviour, which would involve some sort of salad, if a sandwich wasn't included, rather than a sausage roll, or worse, highly processed lunchables, crisps, chocolate etc.

4. Do you think white bread gets a bad reputation or not? Why do you think this is?

White bread does have a reputation for being "empty calories" because the most nutritious part of the grain has been removed.

5. The research shows "children's bread consumption increases intakes of some nutrients which have been proven to be beneficial for long term health, including carbohydrate, starch, fibre, calcium, iron and selenium" how aware, if at all, of this were you before reading the research?

I wasn't at all aware that starch was an essential nutrient. It should be a bigger source of carbohydrate than sugars, of course, but it seems odd having a RDI of it. hmm

6. Do you give your DCs packed lunches for school? If so, how often, if at all does the packed lunch include a sandwich and which type of bread do they usually have? Do you think you're likely to change this after reading the research or not? If so why? If not why not?

My boys take a packed lunch every day. This almost always includes a sandwich and they usually have brown or wholemeal bread or rye bread. Since the results of this research seem to be primarily focused on the amount of bread eaten, I'm not going to be changing this, based on what I've read.

7. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following: "Parents have a tough job when it comes to children's health and nutrition"? Please explain.

On the face of it, it's easy to take the attitude that if you give your children real, fresh food then you can't go far wrong. It's not always that easy, though, since there are so many highly processed foods marketed at kids. Toddlers can be shielded from them, but older children can be more inclined to experiment. I have a particular difficulty, since both of my boys have ASD and food issues stemming from this. DS1 eats fairly well, but we keep having to push him not to narrow the selection of foods he will eat. DS2 won't touch veg or raw fruit, apart from the very odd piece of apple. He even struggles to touch it. This is despite my constant efforts to de-sensitise him - we were playing a tickling game with a lettuce leaf, earlier!

sharond101 Mon 23-Sep-13 21:34:12

My DS isn't at school yet but I will give him brown bread as it's all he has ever known as it's all I buy. I am concerned about the rules surrounding what can and cannot go into a packed lunch. I will always give him fruit but would like him to have a little treat too.

manfalou Mon 23-Sep-13 21:57:54

We have brown bread for two reasons: It is to my belief that it is more nutritionally valuable and it generally does just taste better.

My children aren't of school age yet but as with the above comment Im also concerned with the rules around packed lunches. I believe that it is my choice what I put in my childs lunch box and as long as its not all rubbish I don't see an issue as I know he'll be getting good cooked meal when he comes home.

aristocat Mon 23-Sep-13 21:59:20

Non tester!

Tell us what you think of children's packed lunches, do you find it difficult to know what to put in your DC's lunchbox? Or are your DCs happy to eat what they're given? What about white bread? Do your DC's eat white bread? If not, why is this?

No, mine always have sandwiches in their packed lunches for school. They almost always have white bread (which they prefer) wheras DH will eat brown. DD still likes crusts off hmm
Personally I cannot eat brown bread toasted, so we only ever toast white here. Our consumption ratio is probably white 75:25 brown.

Awkwardsis Mon 23-Sep-13 22:00:34

Tester
1. Before reading the research what was your perception of white bread?
I think I've always thought of it as being about as nutritionally beneficial as cardboard really. I still buy it, ostensibly for the children, though I do sneak the odd slice every now and then. But it's something I'm aware is thought of as being almost the 'lesser' option.

2. Having looked at this research and key findings from Leeds university (based on a study of 2,500 children), have your perceptions changed at all? If so how? If not, why not?
My little internal alarm went off a bit when one of the first things on th e paper was 'further analysis was commissioned by warburtons.' It made me question just how neutral and unbiased this research could be. The fact that the data was collected over 24 hours also made me a bit wary, it's not very exhaustive. I think war buttons have probably cherry picked the good points and slightly brushed over the bad. But, what company doesn't? It's not really changed my perceptions hugely.

3. Which, if any, of the key research findings really resonate with you and why?
The reason I signed up to possibly be picked was because my 5 year old son has just changed from school meals to packed lunches. We're not huge consumers of bread really, I buy a half size warburtons loaf that generally does me and 3 small dc for the school week. But this change has meant an extra loaf a week and I wanted to have an idea of what that might mean. I'm not thrilled about the impact on his salt and fat levels, fat in particular surprises me. But I know that reasonably he has a good balanced diet, and completely anecdotally, does seem to have more energy at the end of the day than when he was eating hot lunches. Wether this is just down to him not being in such a rush to get out and play after having queued for a hot meal and thus leaving half of it, or merely the fact he's more settled in school is anyone's guess.

4. Do you think white bread gets a bad reputation or not? Why do you think this is?
Yes I do think it has a bad reputation. It almost feels like empty pointless calories, when whole meal or seeded offers so much more nutritionally. But I know of very few people, children in particular, who prefer those options.

5. The research shows "children's bread consumption increases intakes of some nutrients which have been proven to be beneficial for long term health, including carbohydrate, starch, fibre, calcium, iron and selenium" how aware, if at all, of this were you before reading the research?
I knew of this, though the research doesn't specify which kind of bread has actually been eaten at all! Eating most forms of carbohydrate would offer similar results I would think.

6. Do you give your DCs packed lunches for school? If so, how often, if at all does the packed lunch include a sandwich and which type of bread do they usually have? Do you think you're likely to change this after reading the research or not? If so why? If not why not?
Yes, as stated my 5 year old son had a packed lunch, and it includes a sandwich using white warburtons small loaf every day. I don't think that'll change as I like that the bread is a manageable size for him and he's quite set on his ways. My 9yo daughter would be more willing to branch out should she choose a packed lunch, perhaps with some cold pasta or a salad.

7. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following: "Parents have a tough job when it comes to children's health and nutrition"? Please explain.
Parents have a tough job full stop. I think most weeks there's something we're meant to feel guilty about and especially nowadays we're meant to be experts in everything - nutrition, education, you name it, there's the feeling that you should always strive to be that little bit better. With changing guidelines and fussy children it was be difficult to know what's best really. I think in a way my children have almost benefitted from my long since recovered eating disorder. I'm so careful not to try not to I still food issues that hopefully they have a pretty easygoing attitude to food. Everything in moderation is a lesson hard learned for me, but one that seems to be working for my family. I see other parents trying to micro manage every aspect of their children's lives, and to an extent that's great. But I think the best thing is to support them in making halt hu choices, rather than force them. Ime that tends to push children to see certain foods as every desirable. So in short, I'm not going to lose any sleep over an extra loaf a week.
Thanks for the opportunity, I did find it very interesting.

Hopezibah Mon 23-Sep-13 22:06:40

Non tester: My son tends to have the same things over and over just because it is easier. I would love to vary it a bit for him but it is hard for me to get the motivation to do that too and as he doesn't seem to mind, we just stick to the same sandwiches and snacks everyday.

All my kids (and hubby too!) prefer white bread. I personally prefer brown but because I am outnumbered we usually buy white bread.

I don't feel it is as healthy as wholemeal - but it is better they eat it than to buy wholemeal and find it is wasted.

I'm always on the look out for EASY lunchbox ideas as that would help give more variety to packed lunches.

BornToFolk Mon 23-Sep-13 22:12:04

Non tester.

DS takes packed lunches to school and mostly has sandwiches, usually on wholemeal bread. I buy/make wholemeal as I prefer the taste and I think it's healthier (higher in fibre and iron that white bread). I do sometimes buy 50/50 for a change, or crusty white bread or rolls or wraps but mostly, we eat wholemeal.

A typical packed lunch for DS is a sandwich, some vegetables, some fruit and a something else! (yoghurt, cheese string, dried fruit, packet of crisps etc) He's usually happy with what he's given. I do sometimes sneak something in that I know he doesn't really like, like egg in his sandwich cos I know he gets so hungry at lunchtime that he'll eat it!

I do sometimes find it a bit challenging to keep things varied as we're vegetarian so sandwich fillings can be a bit limited. DS mostly has peanut butter or cheese and chutney. TBH, he'd be happy having peanut butter every day but I like to at least aim for more variety.

kateandme Mon 23-Sep-13 22:44:44

it was always cooler to have white bread.i have no idea why. but for the most part as weve all grown older the kids have joined us on brown bread.but white is a treat to have still.we never minded either way.
i think white has a bad reputaion.we now have our own bread maker whihch makes fantastic of both colours.but again white home made is the treat becasue its soooo goood.
we have also learnt that white isnt as bad as people say and often store bought wholemeal is nothing but coloured give or take.

packed lunches can be difficult.peer pressure over the smallest things can be tough expeically for sensitve kids who just want to fit in or are being targeted by bullying tactics.
we try to ge tthem to pick a fruit and a treat but dont make chocolate or fruit exlcusive to bad and good catorgories as kids awlays want the naughty option.get them excited by meals.i think a fun lunch box can be more inspiring foe the parent too!!
colourful works.faces.
making a fruite medly pot is great becasue you can say right you have ten seconds to pick three fruits you want chopping up today.they get very excited.
dont be pushy this sends them the other way but also be firm.start as you mean to go on with what is a good lunch box.

Cherrygrape Mon 23-Sep-13 23:15:59

Non tester here. I try put new things in a packed lunch and they just don't get eaten. So we have the same old things.
We generally have brown bread as we prefer the taste, but if white is all the local shop has, then we happily eat white. Dd likes white and brown bread smile

hjmiller Tue 24-Sep-13 07:36:19

I don't think there is any harm in a bit of white bread but I prefer 50/50 and like to use different wraps and rolls for variety. I find the free supermarket magazines are often good for lunchtime inspiration!

Belo Tue 24-Sep-13 08:59:42

Non Tester..... My children have packed lunches. It drives me mad. Most days, it comes back only half eaten. They eat the sandwich (filled with either cheese or chorizo which is all they'll have) and leave the veg and fruit. If they are good and eat all of their lunches, then the following day they'll get a treat included. One of the main reasons they give for not eating their fruit / veg / salad is lack or time, or getting teased by other children who don't have to eat anything other than a sandwich or a packet of crisps.

I only give them granary bread. I think white bread is not filling and isn't as good for them. If they're missing out on a nutritionally balanced school dinner, I want to make the packed lunches as healthy as possible.

Non tester-

Ds still a baby so not yet at an age for packed lunches but I am concerned about how I'm going to convince him that he should have brown bread sandwiches etc when I enjoy white bread wink
I plan on making a variety as I get bored of sandwiches daily so hope that a mix of bread, rolls, wraps etc will work here.

MadMonkeys Tue 24-Sep-13 10:44:47

Non tester

Tell us what you think of children's packed lunches, do you find it difficult to know what to put in your DC's lunchbox?

Not at all. DD1 is 3.8. She has either sandwiches/pasta salad/cous cous
and small amounts of several things - cucumber, tomatoes, smokied cheese, dried apricots, homemade jam tart, blueberries, strawberries etc

Or are your DCs happy to eat what they're given?

Yes, but I never put anything in there that she doesn't like

What about white bread? Do your DC's eat white bread? If not, why is this?

Yes, sometimes white, seeded or sometimes wholemeal, normally homemade

Ramblings Tue 24-Sep-13 11:13:55

Tester

Blog post http://www.realsuburbanmummy.com/2013/09/24/packed-lunches-bread-research-by-warburtons/

1. Before reading the research what was your perception of white bread? I know that brown bread etc is healthier but not worried that white bread is too unhealthy
2. Having looked at this research and key findings from Leeds university (based on a study of 2,500 children), have your perceptions changed at all? If so how? If not, why not? I was pleased to see that all bread has nutritional value in a balanced diet
3. Which, if any, of the key research findings really resonate with you and why? I was pleased to learn that bread has it's place in childrens diets because my children aren't ready to give up toast or sandwiches and I think 'everything in moderation' is a good way to think of food.
4. Do you think white bread gets a bad reputation or not? Why do you think this is? I think that because it's billed as the least healthy bread we focus on that rather than the fact that it can play a good part in our diets
5. The research shows "children's bread consumption increases intakes of some nutrients which have been proven to be beneficial for long term health, including carbohydrate, starch, fibre, calcium, iron and selenium" how aware, if at all, of this were you before reading the research? I wasn't aware of that but think it's good to know.
6. Do you give your DCs packed lunches for school? If so, how often, if at all does the packed lunch include a sandwich and which type of bread do they usually have? Do you think you're likely to change this after reading the research or not? If so why? If not why not? My son started on school dinners this week and will have sandwiches made with white bread 3 days a week or more, this research has confirmed to me that this is appropriate.
7. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following: "Parents have a tough job when it comes to children's health and nutrition"? Please explain. I don't think we have a tough job, we have to view it as part of parenting. It's important to think about what we all put into our bodies and the overall health benefits and detriments of all food. I think it's just all about balance.

dahville Tue 24-Sep-13 11:42:27

Non tester

Tell us what you think of children's packed lunches, do you find it difficult to know what to put in your DC's lunchbox?

I think it is more about what will they actually eat! I can put in lots of healthy and interesting things but will it actually be consumed is a different question entriely.

Or are your DCs happy to eat what they're given?

Total fuss pot! But I'm working on it.

What about white bread? Do your DC's eat white bread? If not, why is this?

I'm fine with white bread and I will continue to offer both. It's not my stule to come down hard and say he can only eat X - I prefer to offer both and he'll come around eventually.

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