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*Delayed start - starting c 12.45pm* Webchat about energy-saving with Ed Davey, Energy and Climate Change Minister, Wednesday 13 February, now 12.45pm

(123 Posts)
JustineMumsnet (MNHQ) Mon 11-Feb-13 17:31:30

Hi all,
We'll be welcoming the Rt Hon Edward Davey, the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, for a webchat on this Wednesday, Feb 13th at 12.30pm - 1.30pm.

Ed Davey has been the LibDem MP for Kingston and Surbiton since 1997 and lives in Surbiton with his wife and son. He served in a number of shadow roles since 2001, including Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury and Shadow Education and Skills Secretary, and became a Minister in the Department for Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS) in May 2011, after the forming of the current coalition government.

Ed is interested in hearing your thoughts on a wide range of issues, including the Government's new Green Deal policy, which launched in late January

Please post your question in advance on this thread, or join us live on Wednesday from 12.30pm-1.30pm.

Screaminabdabs Mon 11-Feb-13 18:17:32

Given the disaster at Fukushima, which caused widespread radioactive contamination, shouldn't Britain follow Germany in closing down nuclear power plants - especially since climate change is resulting in more and more freak weather events, including earthquakes, tornados and the like, which cause Fukushima-style disasters?

Do you think society as a whole and any of the main political parties have really taken on board the severity of the threat of global warming and the importance of developing a significant and even radical green agenda ?
I feel there is a danger of green initiatives being too little too late, and am inclined to support the Green party, who put this issue at the centre of their policies.
Green deal seems fairly encouraging but needs more publicity and support I feel.

Snorbs Mon 11-Feb-13 20:29:05

Given the vastly greater numbers of people who have been killed or injured by pollution from coal- and gas-fired power stations than have ever been killed by nuclear power stations (poorly-run sites such as Windscale, Chernobyl and Fukushima included), and given our ever-dwindling fossil fuels, shouldn't Britain actually bite the bullet and start building some new nuclear power stations before the old ones go off-line and coal/gas prices rise to extortionate levels?

Screaminabdabs Mon 11-Feb-13 21:15:40

grin Snorbs.

OneLieIn Mon 11-Feb-13 23:17:36

Dear Ed

Thanks for coming to Mumsnet. I would like to say Green Deal is a very good idea if it helps the government reach their carbon reduction target. And so are smart meters.

But what about the cost? Don't give me any of that bs political answer. Green deal costs more and maybe over 20 years you might just save enough to pay back your outlay - yes, it goes off my fuel bill, but that is just an advanced form of HP. What about the smart meters? Isn't it true that we are all going to have to pay more than £50 per year per family because we have got a smart meter?

Oh yes, you might reach your target (although I doubt it) and that will be by....us using less electricity and gas ( because we cannot afford it ) and by us spending to insulate our homes and paying it off over the next 20 years.

So, government target, customers paying.....interesting.

What are the government doing - without customers paying - to reach the carbon reduction target?

OneLieIn Mon 11-Feb-13 23:29:55

Sorry change of question.

What are you doing about fuel poverty?

Energy prices up by 7%, 300,000 more homes on brink of fuel poverty, including mine

JeanBillie Tue 12-Feb-13 13:26:53

With energy bills for the average family going up and up, I'd like to know what you are doing to get energy companies to simplify their tariffs?

It's so hard to work out which supplier is genuinely offering the best deal...

Robson5 Tue 12-Feb-13 14:23:02

Do you think the government has done enough to let small local businesses access Green Deal work? As a Mum who helps run a small renewable energy firm and who also gets people to do work on my house, this is a big concern, because generally people trust their small local traders who rely on word of mouth.

LineRunner Tue 12-Feb-13 22:06:55

The Green Deal seems to suggest that people of limited means might take out a 25 year loan to carry out works eg a new boiler and heating that will only have a 10 year guarantee.

Wouldn't people be better off getting a loan from a credit union?

Also what happens when the house is sold, inherited or repossessed? No-one seems to know.

Spike12 Tue 12-Feb-13 22:56:02

Hii
When people move suppliers or move address- as a result of estimated bills on most accounts which do not have a smartmeter- the credit balances are often kept by the energy companies. These amount to tens of millions a year- if not reclaimed by customers the energy companies are legally allowed to keep this money after 6 years. Why does this unclaimed money not go towards fuel poverty or green initiatives? Thank you

gaelicsheep Wed 13-Feb-13 01:13:44

Hello Ed. My question is about energy waste by business. Why are ordinary consumers facing ever higher bills to pay for renewable energy, etc, and millions being wasted on wind farms with dubious environmental credentials, whilst office buildings are still being lit 24 hours a day, computers left on day and night, and so on. Why are you not concentrating properly on, not paying lip service to reducing large scale energy waste before passing on ever more costs to individuals?

gaelicsheep Wed 13-Feb-13 01:17:54

By "you" I mean the government in conjunction with the energy companies.

A cheeky second question if there's time. What is being done to help bridge the large gap in heating costs faced by on grid and off grid consumers? I don't mean hardship tariffs, I mean bringing baseline heating costs into line for all.

When social housing is built, why is there not an onus on building green technologies into it? Heat exchangers, solar PV or wind turbines would save/provide energy for those who need it most, and bring families out of fuel poverty. Councils should be able to negotiate bulk deals on technologies, and use FITs to maintain communal areas.
I cannot use a smart meter as I have solar PV and the meter cannot measure the direction of the power in the cable (The sun coming out gives the same reading as boiling a kettle!). How will the smart meter roll out deal with more complex cases such as mine?

JeanBillie Wed 13-Feb-13 09:33:18

What do you think about Earth Hour? Do you support such initiatives? Thank you

theLeans Wed 13-Feb-13 09:37:35

Hello,

The Green Deal offers a very positive step forward for energy usage and should have been in place many years ago.

While the dropping of energy consuption is important, it is also important that we reduce our waste in general ( the 3 R's). I notice that some Scottish Councils have tax breaks for those who use reusable nappies, would it be possible to do this in England? Yes, it would require some central gvmt funding but surely the amount is relatively small for the potential level of impact?

Thanks

DL

CinnamonStix Wed 13-Feb-13 09:39:00

I've looked into The Green Deal recently, as I need to replace my windows. I read the MoneySavingExpert article on it and to be honest, I find it baffling. It's not very easy to understand how it works and what the implications are.

How do you think taking on The Green Deal will affect the sell-ability of a house?

Choccheesecake Wed 13-Feb-13 09:52:09

We have a 20+ year-old boiler that works brilliantly but is not terribly efficient. Every time we think we should really get a new one the engineers tell us that this one is likely to go on forever and new ones are rubbish and break all the time. We are tempted to stick with the old one (mainly to save a couple of grand) but feel guilty that we're not being very environmentally friendly. What advice would you give to people who can't really afford to upgrade their homes to make it greener but still want to do their bit?

bestbefore Wed 13-Feb-13 10:29:43

My question is about recycling - we do loads (with the support of our local, Epping Forest, Council) but I wonder how much support/ demand there is from businesses (small and large) for recycling consumables? I am thinking about cafes like M&S cafe or McDonalds or other places where you get, say a can of coke or a burger in a cardboard tray - these all seem to be put into general waste bins and then disposed of - what happens to them?
Do businesses get any extra bins for recycling cans/ glass bottles etc or do the council deal with it or is it all just put into land fill? If so it seems a shame when we as householders do our bit.

LauraB65 Wed 13-Feb-13 10:40:18

It's all very well encouraging individuals to live sustainability with the Green Deal, but the damage caused by aviation is greater than all domestic energy use put together. Can you guarantee that you'll resist pressure from the CBI and not build the third runway at Heathrow?

EnergyDad Wed 13-Feb-13 11:02:58

Hi Ed. Which Green Deal measures will you be having installed at your home?

Louisefs Wed 13-Feb-13 11:03:32

I'd like to know how to find a Green Deal Installer.
When I get an assessment done will they recommend someone or can I sort that out myself using local tradesmen I have used in the past

amazingmummy Wed 13-Feb-13 11:09:10

Hi Ed,

How did it feel rescuing a woman from being hit by a train? That was pretty brave... I'm impressed!

Is Mr Cable really as cuddly as he seems on tv?

UpOverAndOut Wed 13-Feb-13 11:12:52

Hi Ed, You've said previously you're not a fan of on-shore wind turbines is that purely an issue of aesthetics?

ariannasdei Wed 13-Feb-13 11:18:52

How is the price of energy in the future calculated within the green deal? Can you please let me know where I can find this information? Thank you.

RichFewster Wed 13-Feb-13 11:22:39

How do I go about applying for an ECO grant to get insulation work done on my property?

I think I qualify for some work to be done under ECO (loft, cavity wall etc) but having a hard time trying to find anyone who will sign me up. And can part of the work be done on ECO then I pay the extra?

How do I find out about the eligibility criteria for ECO?

finecheese Wed 13-Feb-13 11:22:43

As a mother who works for a young 'crowd-financing' company that provides the opportunity for ordinary people and families to invest in renewable energy projects I'd be interested to know the following:

I know the government is trying to get people more involved in community renewables - generally speaking, how do you see the government supporting these business models which both support community energy and provide the much needed economical growth within the UK?

PS - what did you have on your pancakes yesterday?

Thankyou!

MrsHelenJK Wed 13-Feb-13 11:24:27

Hi Mr Davey,

I'd like to say that I do support anything that we can do as a country to reduce our carbon emissions (I work in the climate change field), but I am concerned that in a time of financial austerity we are encouraging citizens to take out significant loans. DEBT is an increasing problem today with students taking out massive loans, and mortgages being often unaffordable. Is a policy of adding to debt a sensible one at this time?

LittleTyga Wed 13-Feb-13 11:24:33

Good afternoon Ed,

Firstly fracking (sp) I don't think we should be supporting this what are your thoughts?

Also drilling for oil in the Arctic - this must be stopped it's so damaging to the wildlife especially if there is a spill.

Finally will you be supporting Tim Yeo and his call for clean electricity?

LadyMaryQuiteContrary Wed 13-Feb-13 11:24:47

Hi Ed,

I really love the ideas for green energy but why should the consumer foot the bill when the energy companies are bleeding us dry with their constant price hikes?

LittleTyga Wed 13-Feb-13 11:25:46

Oh good question LadyMary smile

LadyMaryQuiteContrary Wed 13-Feb-13 11:27:33

smile Thank you.

Energetically Wed 13-Feb-13 11:32:28

Dear Mr. Davey,
We are anxiously awaiting details of the 2nd Tranch of the Energy Entrepreneurs Fund but there appears to be a deafining silence? There are opportunities to radically reduce heat poverty for households if the FIT could be applied to CHP across more than one home. What plans to you have to help families in this context?

KitandAdamsmum Wed 13-Feb-13 11:34:30

Hi Ed

The UK has some of the most energy inefficient homes in Europe, and some of the highest levels of fuel poverty ie when people can't afford to keep warm.

What impact do you think the Green Deal is going to have on levels of fuel poverty? If, as I suspect, it won't have much impact, what else is the government going to do to make sure every family can keep warm in winter?

Thanks.

wendy36912 Wed 13-Feb-13 11:37:12

I work for a local council. We think the Green Deal is a very good scheme. However, why does the Green Deal Pioneering Places funds have to be spent in such a short period of time. Most Green Deal Providers are still not ready. Furthermore, there is not enough Green Deal Assessors in place yet to cope with the demand. Can you be more flexible and let this money be used beyond the end of March?

Meglet Wed 13-Feb-13 11:42:15

Hello,

When are the government start being tougher with the big energy companies alwys putting their prices up? There is only so much insulation and energy saving that families can do.

And I second gaelicsheep question about what you are doing to ensure big companies save energy. Offices lit at night, shop doors wide open etc.

armchairbackpacker Wed 13-Feb-13 11:42:40

Regarding the GreenDeal. I had my survey done in December 2012. The cashback portal is now open but I cant register as I havent had my report back yet. My supplier said it is because the government software to produce the report isnt available yet. and I have queried this with another supplier who said the same (that the questions to decide the cost reduction in our energy were still not confirmed and until they are the software isnt available).

When will I get my report, I am desperate to get cracking with the GreenDeal and am a big supporter of the scheme but this delay is frustrating?

Thanks

neilwilliams Wed 13-Feb-13 11:43:07

I want to do the Green deal because I have a hard to treat home(c.1780) with solid walls in conservation area. I have done the obvious insulation measures but hope to put external insulation on the side wall. I would hope to get ECO assistance, but don't want a loan. Can I get an ECO grant under the Green Deal without taking out a loan?

PaulJHarrison76 Wed 13-Feb-13 11:44:25

Hello Ed
I am a qualified energy assessor working for one of the accreditation schemes involved in the EPBD scheme and Green deal scheme.

I am living in a property that was built in the 1990s and the EPC that is issued against my property states that the cavity wall is assumed to have insulation in it, because the building regulations at that time state that it should have been installed.
However I've have had a bora scope of the cavity wall which shows that there is no insulation in the walls. Also my house gets very cold shortly after the heating goes off, and my energy bills are very high.
My question is: When I produce an EPC for my property, there is no recommendation for cavity wall insulation with a green tick to enable me to apply for Green Deal funding. Is this something that you are aware of, and are there any plans to tackle this problem in the future.

AnonymousDad Wed 13-Feb-13 11:50:24

I am a Green Deal Advisor and a Provider. I allways try to assertain if a homeowner is eligible for an Energy Company Obligation grant before discussing Green Deal as I feel this is in the best interests of the householder.

I am dissapointed that the marketing campaign does not include information about ECO, is there any intention to include it in future marketing?

www.GDAA.org.uk
www.greendealnet.co.uk

mikey9 Wed 13-Feb-13 11:54:45

Ed,
Isn't it about time the governement started bieing very clear about the amount of subsidy (in all it's forms) all types of electricity generation has had (and continues to have) over the years. This would need to include the finance for construction of Coal and Gas power stations and especially Nuclear - but also the huge projected de-commissioning costs - also the payments for non-production that go out to all production (no just wind as the media would have us believe).

You seem to stand on the sidelines quietly allowing misinformation to be put out there (because YOU don't like onshore wind perhaps) rather than putting the record straight with some facts - with something as important as how our future energy needs will be supplied - I would expect full and complete information - supplied by governement to be a given - allowing us make an informed choice.

When writing press releases always remember - "information without perspective" is useless.

AlbanThurston Wed 13-Feb-13 11:58:19

Adding to finecheese's terrific question; How does the Sec of State square his Energy Bill's complete lack of detail on communities generating their own energy, with his Department's supposed advocacy for local energy co-ops? Isn't he facing both ways, with a bill which offers under-the-counter handouts to expensive nuclear? The consultation run by DECC on Community Energy will report only in October, long after he wants his Energy Bill to become law. And the Bill as presented by the coalition with a low ceiling of 20 Megawatts on the amounts of energy permitted for generation by communities, actually makes it more difficult for co-ops to scale up, along the ambitious lines of cities like Berlin, Munich, and the UK cities - Sheffield, Stoke, London - which would like to copy them?

JasonC Wed 13-Feb-13 11:58:50

Can we use the Green Deal if we get cheaper finance than the 7% on offer, with all the safeguards? Nationwide are offering Green additional borrowing loans at 2.29%.

mylittlechamp Wed 13-Feb-13 12:04:04

Insulate my loft or pay for nursery fees - which do you recommend?

GreenerSky Wed 13-Feb-13 12:15:11

The Green Deal (or energy efficient measure) will become compulsory for landlords over the next few years are there plans to make it compulsory for all households?

Thank you

energy act 2011
The Energy Act 2011 contains powers so that from
2016 landlords should not be able to refuse reasonable
requests for consent to install Green Deal measures
from their tenants. From 2018 landlords should ensure
their privately rented properties meet a minimum
energy efficiency standard (likely to be set at EPC
rating ‘E’) or that they have installed the maximum
package of measures under the Green Deal.

JonLew Wed 13-Feb-13 12:15:44

Hi Ed..Looks like landlords will do well out of the Green Deal..they can get the dwelling refubished to make it more energy efficient, and as the monthly electricity bill is in the tenant's name, the tenants will be the ones who cover the cost ?

DerekfromBerwick Wed 13-Feb-13 12:16:44

For Ed Davey: Many sceptics are doubtful about whether the Green Deal and ECO are going to deliver what they should. How open to ideas for changing the scheme are you.

Falkor Wed 13-Feb-13 12:19:15

As a worried working mum, I have a more general cultural and educational question from me. With public figures such as Matt Damon on his last Gus Van Sant film about hydraulic fracturing in the US titled Promised Land now becoming mainstream worldwide, and also the London's Southbank Centre hosting public figures as such Yoko Ono, who is currently leading an artists campaign against fracking in NYC, curating the Meltdown this summer, would you be able to stand up to your decision that current shale gas extraction methods are safe for british water supply and earthquakes free for this country and their future generations?

Tianc Wed 13-Feb-13 12:20:09

Ed

Most people don’t realise that the main purposes of smart meters include:

a) to charge higher prices at peak times and cause localised power cuts within the house

b) to enable utility companies to effectively cut customers off without going through the current check and justification mechanism of a magistrate’s court.

Purpose (a) is because the Dept for Energy and Climate Change (DECC) have decided to manage falling generation capacity by rationing power, rather than increasing capacity. But instead of using a per capita method of rationing, as with food during WWII, DECC has plumped for pure ability-to-pay.

The rich will continue using what they like when they like; the poor will face unaffordable prices at peak times, and localised power cuts switching off their freezer and washing machine. The working poor – Clegg’s “alarm clock Britain” - will be disproportionately impacted, as they have little choice about when to shower, cook, dry clothes, etc.

Why has there been no national debate about this?

Obviously the utility companies are delighted at being able to pass on peak prices, instead of averaging as now. It dumps their commercial risk onto the individual customer.

It’s less clear why DECC are supporting this method.

But then this is the same DECC which allows utility companies to charge more for the first so-many units and then discounts on the excess. Which is jolly nice in commercial terms of competing for high-usage customers, but has no place in reducing overall consumption.

Which brings me to (b). And indeed all the other lovely things packaged with Smart Meters to benefit the utility companies but which put customers at risk.

Like the facility to reprogram Smart Meters remotely, via internet and mobile phone technology.

Utility companies will be able to reprogram Smart Meters into prepayment meters, or cut supply completely, or restrict it to a trickle, without having to access the premises – and therefore without asking permission from the customer or satisfying a magistrate.

They’ll promise not to be naughty, of course, but their track record isn’t convincing (utility co takes 854 out of a MNer?s account in breach of direct debit regulations and another doesn?t even know what meters are at MNer?s address. And these are hardly unusual.)

But this pales in comparison to the risk to critical national infrastructure of remote reprogramming, which makes every Smart Meter in the country vulnerable to everything from software-update failure a la NatWest, to Chinese state hackers. The government’s own Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure has warned continually about this.

There’s also the little matter of privacy, which I won’t try to cram in here. (See previous thread with detail and links to DECC documents and cybersecurity analyses: Anyone having a gas/leccy meter replaced with a Smart Meter? Something you need to know. )

Smart Meters, of a rather safer kind, could potentially have a role to play in reducing carbon footprint. and there is a valid discussion to be had about how we as a nation wish to ration essential goods like power.

But the Smart Meter package as currently envisaged is primarily about utility companies’ bottom line, using DECC’s green agenda as cover. Why on earth are you playing along with this?

WoodysMumJess Wed 13-Feb-13 12:21:19

Hi Ed,

I like the idea of the Green Deal and want to take advantage but having contacted a Provider, been told there's a delay in the software. Half the providers I contacted never came back to me. This isn't a great start!

Also, from chatting to people (fellow Mums!), not that many people seem to know about it - I'm a bit of an Eco-geek - but do you think there needs to be more home owner education?

Thanks

Superhomeharriet Wed 13-Feb-13 12:22:05

You delivered an excellent speech yesterday at the Royal Society making your concern about climate change and your commitment to sustainable energy clear. Thank you. In the meantime the Energy Bill is in committee stage. Although amendments have been added so that the Secretary of state may set a decarbonisation target range after 2016, no such target is set in the current bill. The Climate Change Committee recommended a target of 50gm CO2 per kWh of electricity generated but even the much weaker target of 100gm CO2 is not is set. This leaves me feeling that the Conservative MPs on your committee really lack the determination necessary for the country to decarbonise our energy by 80% in 2050 as promised in the Climate Change Bill. Do you really feel the Energy Bill has the teeth it needs for real change?

JaneGMumsnet (MNHQ) Wed 13-Feb-13 12:22:15

Hi all

We've received a call to say that Edward Davey has been delayed by around 15 minutes, so we won't be able to start at 12.30pm on the dot.

Apologies, and we'll be with you as quickly as we can.

Thanks,

MNHQ

CanaScot Wed 13-Feb-13 12:23:58

To be a success, selling the Green Deal to households has to include a reminder of our social and environmental responsibility. In the past people may have said "I'd have solar panels, but they are too expensive - only the rich can afford to go green". Now there is the opportunity for all households to go green and it actually not cost them a penny.

Ok we can complain about the interest rate, and the number of years to pay back and impact on property sales - but in reality, it should not cost you any more than you already pay for energy and over time with increasing energy prices savings will become apparent. But in the end you are doing something good for the planet. Most of us don't get paid for recycling - we do it because it's good for the planet. We invest time and space in our homes and it makes us feel good - because it costs nothing and it is helping the planet, just like the Green Deal. I would say if you can afford to pay for your own energy efficiency improvements or renewables upfront, then great - do it that way. But if you can't then you no longer have an excuse as to why you are unable to participate in Greening our planet.

MattWilcox Wed 13-Feb-13 12:25:31

Afternoon Ed,

On page 7 of the Governments "A Guide to energy performance certificates for the construction, sale and let of dwellings" it states that:

“From 9th January 2013, the following types of buildings will not require an EPC:

· Buildings and monuments protected as part of a designated environment or because of their special architectural or historic merit in so far as compliance with certain energy requirements would unacceptably alter their character or appearance."

Can you confirm that a building can either be listed OR as part of a designated environment? And what is the definition of a "designated environment"?

I would greatly appreciate your explanation to my questions?

Thanks

fadgers Wed 13-Feb-13 12:27:33

Message deleted by Mumsnet for breaking our Talk Guidelines. Replies may also be deleted.

Threaders57 Wed 13-Feb-13 12:30:15

Hi Great support of Green Deal but am confused regarding what is being asked for Green Deal works which offers full consumer protection with PAS2030 and Code of practice and what is being proposed for ECO, which seems to be a watered down version offer incompleted consumer protection and limited protect.
What are you going to do to ensure consistant consumer protection across both schemes.??

silstrep Wed 13-Feb-13 12:36:47

Hello Mr Davey
I'd like to know what the respective figures are (roughly) for government subsidies to a) renewable energy and b) nuclear energy? Are government subsidies for the latter much higher?

LMBrown Wed 13-Feb-13 12:40:06

The biggest uptake for the Domestic Green Deal scheme I can see is for private landlords, who as of now had no incentive to make their properties energy efficient as their tenants foot the energy bills. Most of these properties are regularly EPC level G (the worst efficiency rating - a cow barn would be Level G for comparison). Unfortunately, rented property in the UK houses the majority of our lower income families and adds significantly to the fuel poverty instances.
It is my understanding that any rented property in the UK is to conform to at least level E and above from 2018 with tenants able to ask for reasonable energy efficiency measures from 2016 onwards.
This is a welcome move but I can imagine the private landlord lobby is fairly active in campaigning against this legislation. Do you have a strategy for ensuring there is no U-turn on this policy? Can it be brought forward?

Ubiquitous Wed 13-Feb-13 12:40:13

Dear Ed,

Why is the Green Deal finance interest rate so high.

Considering the government can borrow substantially below the 6/7% often discussed it would be a great incentive to people if the interest rate was lower and make more measures available under the Green Deal.

MichelaB Wed 13-Feb-13 12:42:47

We have seen strong interest in Home Energy Reports such as those provided by Opower and other providers as a tool to educate consumers to become more energy efficient. Do you think that they would be a useful tool to promote the Green Deal?

Chrisjw Wed 13-Feb-13 12:44:32

Ed,
You say Green Deal is a flagship policy, but 90% of homeowners don't know what it is. You have spent £400k on a couple of adverts, but in total over 2 years will spend under £3m on awareness. That's 1/76th of the awareness money the Govt spent on the digital switchover. When will you back this policy seriously?

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 12:45:06

Hi - now online - sorry got derailed by a House of Lords committee.
Will start answering as many as poss - thanks for all the questions! Ed

PeterBarry Wed 13-Feb-13 12:45:45

What channels have Freuds utilised in their £410,000 brief to promote the Green Deal?

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 12:48:04

Louisefs

I'd like to know how to find a Green Deal Installer.
When I get an assessment done will they recommend someone or can I sort that out myself using local tradesmen I have used in the past

Hi Louise - a good factual one to start! To find out more about the Green Deal go to www.gov.uk/greendeal - on the website, there's a tool to help you find a green deal assessor in your area. and if you're interested about the green deal or simply about saving energy and money, phone 03001231234.
When you get an assessment, you are free to go with any supplier you want, who is green deal accredited - and the web site can help you find an installer too.

CMOTDibbler Wed 13-Feb-13 12:48:22

Hi Ed, so what steps have you and your family taken to reduce your energy impact?

AMDEA Wed 13-Feb-13 12:48:26

Mr Davey - Do you think that there will be scope for the Green Deal to lend money for buying energy-efficient appliances? Many people have old and energy-hungry fridge-freezers or washing machines but they cannot afford the upfront cost of buying a new one. This could be quite a short-term loan, compared with, say the cost of installing double glazing.

SinkingShip1 Wed 13-Feb-13 12:50:24

Do you really think it is wise to encourage debt finance given recent events and the state of the economy? Despite working full time my wages work out at just over £35 a day when my salary, after tax and NI, is divided by 365. Of that, £2.80 a day is paid to the local council as tax, who, under Government pressure, are slowly relieving themselves of their social responsibilities. Would I like a Green Deal loan? No thank you, but I would like to live my life without worrying about finances every day.

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 12:51:55

Robson5

Do you think the government has done enough to let small local businesses access Green Deal work? As a Mum who helps run a small renewable energy firm and who also gets people to do work on my house, this is a big concern, because generally people trust their small local traders who rely on word of mouth.

Hi Robson5 - one of the big differences with green deal compared to past government energy efficiency schemes is that it is far more open to small firms. You're spot on that word of mouth can be key! Green deal is really about creating a whole new market in energy efficiency - where every person can buy - and as many SMEs can sell - so long as they are accredited (to protect consumers!).
We've been working with a whole host of small and medium firms, to make sure green deal is open to them - and we will keep working to make sure this market is as competitive and open as possible

BlueNeil61 Wed 13-Feb-13 12:55:12

Hi Ed,

Why do you think the Green Deal has been so slow to get off the ground? There has been very little visible advertising. Do you think the up front assessment cost and the interest rate on the loans is preventing people from taking the plunge?

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 12:55:51

JugglingFromHereToThere

Do you think society as a whole and any of the main political parties have really taken on board the severity of the threat of global warming and the importance of developing a significant and even radical green agenda ?
I feel there is a danger of green initiatives being too little too late, and am inclined to support the Green party, who put this issue at the centre of their policies.
Green deal seems fairly encouraging but needs more publicity and support I feel.

Dear Juggler!
I got into politics because of my concern about the environment - a long time ago! I'd read "Seeing Green" by Porritt when i was 19 then devoured lots of similar books - so I'm personally committed. Nowadays, I think lots of politicians, from all parties, recognise the threat from climate change. Myself, from the scientists I talk to, the threat is getting worse!
We have to do everything we can - in the UK with things like the green deal, green investmnet bank, massive investment in railways, renewable energy - etc - plus woprking with other countries in the eu and globally. And you're right we need to give this massive effort more publicity

Paul74 Wed 13-Feb-13 12:57:31

Webchat delayed, very much like the Green Deal. will this Government ever be able to stick to a timeframe?

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 13:00:26

Ubiquitous

Dear Ed,

Why is the Green Deal finance interest rate so high.

Considering the government can borrow substantially below the 6/7% often discussed it would be a great incentive to people if the interest rate was lower and make more measures available under the Green Deal.

Ubiquitous - where are you today?!

The green deal interest rate is actually low compared to almost any other form of unsecured credit. Try getting a 25 year loan, unsecured anywhere else, at a lower rate? And a loan that you may not end up fully paying off, as you pass it on to the next tenant or homeowner who enjoys the huge benefit of lower energy bills and a warmer home, when you move out of your current property?

We think over 80% of people will be able to benefit from this unsecured credit - whereas only around 50% of people can get unsecured credit now. If you look at the many forms of credit people use today, apart from mortgages, the vast majority comes in at high and ultra high rates and charges - green deal doesn't PLUs - and this is a big plus, the cost and the credit MUST be lower than the estimated savings you make on your energy bill. So actiually, the green deal is aiming to make you better off!

Chrisjw Wed 13-Feb-13 13:00:41

Well said! Paul74

JonLew Wed 13-Feb-13 13:00:56

Ed ..You say "Nowadays, I think lots of politicians, from all parties, recognise the threat from climate change"
..but how many of the nation's MP's do you believe really "get it " and will push to Act. Now.?

Paul74 Wed 13-Feb-13 13:03:04

Hello Ed,

I have invested a lot of money i becoming a GDA and GDI and have been gearing my business up specifically for Green Deal. I am now losing money on a weekly basis as i do not have the ability to find a Provider who has the software ready or finance available to create a Green Deal plan. Please can you explain why when the scheme was due to launch in October, now at the end of January but things still are not underway.

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 13:03:07

amazingmummy

Hi Ed,

How did it feel rescuing a woman from being hit by a train? That was pretty brave... I'm impressed!

Is Mr Cable really as cuddly as he seems on tv?

Dear Amazing
That was a long time ago! It felt a bit scarey, especially when I saw the lights of the non-stop express train coming round the bend at Clapham Junction - but you act on instinct.
As for Vince being cuddly, that's not quite how i see him - but he does have a wicked sense of humour

Chrisjw Wed 13-Feb-13 13:03:18

Who do we call when the energy bills don't come down be the predicted amounts, but we still have the loan to pay?

ClaireBearLeG Wed 13-Feb-13 13:03:34

The customer journey within the Green Deal starts with getting an assessment from a Green Deal Advisor and the data collected underpins the financial product they MIT end up with ie will the improvements installed pay for themselves so they are either better off or warmer/healthier etc. So what are you doing to guarantee the integrity and impartiality of the assessment, and how is a race to the bottom of fees prevented, particularly for sole trader (likely the better) GDAs?

AnonymousDad Wed 13-Feb-13 13:05:28

BlueNeil61 - The Green Deal Advisor Association has had 777 surveys ordered in 2 weeks, that sounds like a good take up to me.

www.gdaa.org.uk

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 13:06:46

Chrisjw

Ed,
You say Green Deal is a flagship policy, but 90% of homeowners don't know what it is. You have spent £400k on a couple of adverts, but in total over 2 years will spend under £3m on awareness. That's 1/76th of the awareness money the Govt spent on the digital switchover. When will you back this policy seriously?

Hi Chris
We didn't want to start advertising until everything was ready to go - that would have wasted money and left people disappointed - so we've actually only just started our advertising spend.
There's been a recent yougov survey that shows after two weeks 39% of people say they've heard of green deal - so awareness is rising. And we've got some more advertising planned.
It's a fine balance - we want to stimulate demand, but we want the industry's supply chains to develop sustainably, and we certainly don't want to waste taxpayers' money. Plus lots of firms are now starting their own advertising. So we are keeping that under review, and will be spending more

MattWilcox Wed 13-Feb-13 13:06:54

Ed,

The Green Deal loan obviously stays with the property rather than the tenant. If the original tenant then leaves, will this loan not put off many potential new tenants?

This also leads me to my second question. If a property becomes void and yet still has a Green Deal loan attached, who is responsible for paying for it?

JustineMumsnet (MNHQ) Wed 13-Feb-13 13:07:00

JonLew

Ed ..You say "Nowadays, I think lots of politicians, from all parties, recognise the threat from climate change"
..but how many of the nation's MP's do you believe really "get it " and will push to Act. Now.?

Reminder to all to please restrict yourself to one question so everyone can get a turn. Please do take a look at our webchat guidelines for more explanation. Txs.

Halogenfairies1 Wed 13-Feb-13 13:08:07

Message deleted by Mumsnet for breaking our Talk Guidelines. Replies may also be deleted.

Fahaad Wed 13-Feb-13 13:10:57

Hi Ed
I am a Green deal Advisor. Green Deal is with no upfront cost but we charge them £99 to £150 for GD assessment. If customer does not proceed for GD, then what about the upfront cost? Because he/she was stimulated for assessment by GD. Thanks

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 13:11:42

Superhomeharriet

You delivered an excellent speech yesterday at the Royal Society making your concern about climate change and your commitment to sustainable energy clear. Thank you. In the meantime the Energy Bill is in committee stage. Although amendments have been added so that the Secretary of state may set a decarbonisation target range after 2016, no such target is set in the current bill. The Climate Change Committee recommended a target of 50gm CO2 per kWh of electricity generated but even the much weaker target of 100gm CO2 is not is set. This leaves me feeling that the Conservative MPs on your committee really lack the determination necessary for the country to decarbonise our energy by 80% in 2050 as promised in the Climate Change Bill. Do you really feel the Energy Bill has the teeth it needs for real change?

Thank you super harriet! In giving the speech i felt i was talking to an audience who knew more than I did, given there was so many brilliant scientists working on climate change analysis in the room.
As for the energy bill, the climate change committee argued for the target to be set in secondary legislation and not on the face of the bill, so the amendments we've made have some support. The real debate in government was first whether to have one, and then when to set it. We propose to set in 2016 - when i predict we will probably be the first country ever to set such a target (though if I'm wrong, I'm pleased others will have copied our approach!). As for teeth, the bill is a dramatic step forward for low carbon - and it's about incentives really not teeth! We have to persuade investors to invest tens of billions of pounds, so we need a framework that attracts that cash, whilst not costing people and business too much.
Naturally, i think we've got the balance right!!

JustineMumsnet (MNHQ) Wed 13-Feb-13 13:11:45

Please don't plug your Green Deal business on this webchat. If you'd like info on advertising to Mumsnet users then do please drop us a line at info@mumsnet.com. We'd be delighted to assist. Thank you.

Chrisjw Wed 13-Feb-13 13:14:58

39%? Hard to believe this in just two weeks....when you were placing the Advert in The Times ( amongst others) Surely the Green Deal isn't really aimed at the middle class Times reader who can just put energy improvement measures on their mortgage at c2%?

SteveSmith48 Wed 13-Feb-13 13:15:20

PaulJHarrison76, in RdSAP there should be the option to input a known U-value if you know it - this will over-ride the assumption that the cavity is insulated. For an unfilled cavity, dependent on construction, it will generally be 1.60/1.55 W/m2K - when you enter this a recommendation for cavity wall insulation should be included?

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 13:16:24

ariannasdei

How is the price of energy in the future calculated within the green deal? Can you please let me know where I can find this information? Thank you.

It's calculated on the current price of energy - so if the price of energy goes up, the savings will be even higher. Now, you might say, what if energy prices go down? Two points. The estimates of savings are very conservative - deliberately underscored, so even if prices fall a bit, it's likely you'd still gain. Yet - and here's some bad news - all the predictions are that energy prices are going to continue going up - partly because of the global demand in countries from china to india, especially for gas. So, that's yet another reason to do green deal - insulate your pocket from likely higher energy prices, and get a warmer home and a bigger bank balance

reluctantdad1 Wed 13-Feb-13 13:17:57

Ed

Please please please legislate so that shops close their doors. Over 100 high street chains have open door policies and blast hot air into the street, even some charity shops. In summer it's the same with air conditioning. Staff are cold in winter, hot in summer, and exposed to pollution from traffic. It's scandalous. It's the lowest hanging carbon reduction fruit imaginable. Please visit http://www.closethedoor.org.uk for more details. Please stop this madness.

Mumsnetters, please throw your weight behind this campaign - who do you think is paying for the additional heating? Yep, YOU.

Paul74 Wed 13-Feb-13 13:18:07

Hello Ed,

I have invested a lot of money in becoming a GDA and GDI and have been gearing my business up specifically for Green Deal. I am now losing money on a weekly basis as i do not have the ability to find a Provider who has the software ready or finance available to create a Green Deal plan. Please can you explain why when the scheme was due to launch in October, now at the end of January but things still are not underway.

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 13:18:54

UpOverAndOut

Hi Ed, You've said previously you're not a fan of on-shore wind turbines is that purely an issue of aesthetics?

Dear upoverandout
don't know your source - I am a fan of onshore wind, actually. I have said I don't think they are appropriate in every area, and we've increased the say iof local communities in planning and later this year will put forward proposals so local communities get bigger benefits from hosting a wind farm in their area. So I don't think wind farms should go everywhere, but they have a vital role to play in providing clean green energy for the future

aliceb4 Wed 13-Feb-13 13:20:17

Hi Ed,
Thanks for coming to Mumsnet. This government promised to be the "greenest ever" but all the noise coming out of the Treasury and No. 10 including the appointment of environment minister, Owen Paterson, (who many see as a climate change denier) seems to indicate that they've had a massive change of heart. You are obviously committed to the Green agenda, however. Do you really feel that Cameron and Osborne are too?

(Oh and by way of tradition, what's your fave biscuit?)

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 13:21:10

A couple of people have asked about what I've done to save energy...
Not enough - yet! I did replace my front door last year, which was leaking energy, and when we bought a new boiler two years ago, I researched hard and got a super energy efficient boiler - plus I now try to ensure the electric appliances I buy are labeled at least A (very energy efficient) or ideally A+++, (super energy efficient). however - and this is the key point - I'm going to get green dealed!!

sareen Wed 13-Feb-13 13:25:25

What will happen when energy bills rise and the savings made are reduced, is there a chance that people will end up paying out of their own pockets rather than the savings in their energy bills?

Ubiquitous Wed 13-Feb-13 13:25:28

Dear Ed,

Would you like me to carry out your Green Deal assessment?

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 13:27:22

MattWilcox

Ed,

The Green Deal loan obviously stays with the property rather than the tenant. If the original tenant then leaves, will this loan not put off many potential new tenants?

This also leads me to my second question. If a property becomes void and yet still has a Green Deal loan attached, who is responsible for paying for it?

Dear Matt Wilcox,
thanks for that question. i think the green deal is a real boost for the private rented sector - where we have some of the least energy efficient homes in the UK. The probelmn before green deal, was that the landlord had not incentive to make the property warmer and more energy efficient - because the tenant paid the energy bill, whilst the landlord would be paying for the improvements. With the green deal, the incentives are aligned - the tenant pays the green deal charge, the landlord gets an improved property - but future tenants won't be put off, because they can be confident that the green deal charge they will pay on their energy bill, if they move in, will be lower thnan the energy savings made as a result of that charge. So the potential tenant knows they are moving into a warmer home, with almost certainly lower energy bills (including the green deal charge).
Far from putting a tenant or for that matter a future purchaser of your home off, the green deal ought to be highly attractive!
If the property is void, yet the landlord would end up picking up the green deal charge, but for any one period of being void, that cost will be small - and they have a very marketable property

Paul74 Wed 13-Feb-13 13:28:00

Hello Ed,

How soon do you think Green Deal Plans will be installed in greater numbers?

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 13:29:07

A few mumsnetters are asking about businesses saving energy - good news! the green deal can be used by businesses to. We think it can be a great deal for small firms. No need to talk to the bank to improve your property, save costs and become more competitive. just go to www.gov.uk/greendeal and find out how to get your business a green deal

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 13:33:54

Fahaad

Hi Ed
I am a Green deal Advisor. Green Deal is with no upfront cost but we charge them £99 to £150 for GD assessment. If customer does not proceed for GD, then what about the upfront cost? Because he/she was stimulated for assessment by GD. Thanks

Great to see a green deal advisor here!
First, there are some firms whose business model doesn't include an assessment fee - but second, the green deal assessment may still be worth it for many people, even if they don't immediately proceed to call up a green deal installer. It might change their behaviour. They might decide to fund the home improvements a different way. They might use the assessment when selling their home later. They might wait till they decide to redecorate or fit a new kitchen and so on. So my message is simple - an assessment will be good value for money - but always check the assessor is an accreditred green deal advisor like you, Fahaad!

fadgers Wed 13-Feb-13 13:33:56

Sorry i broke the in house rules i only registered today for the first time , just trying to help everybody save money with cost effective energy saving products which are almost unknown to most Brits . will somebody explain what is permissible and what is not

PaulJHarrison76 Wed 13-Feb-13 13:35:06

SteveSmith48 - I personally think this is a good idea, but as an auditor, I would be required to provide evidence of how I have determined the U-value, or i will fail my audit. This is stated in the RdSAP convention 3.08.

NearlyEverything Wed 13-Feb-13 13:36:06

Hi Ed

Please answer aliceb4's question about Osborne, Cameron, Patterson et al - aren't you pushing jelly up a hill when so many senior cabinet ministers are so deeply hostile to the carbon agenda?

The loss of Chris Huhne doesn't help in this respect either; do you think he will be missed?

Chrisjw Wed 13-Feb-13 13:37:03

I was at a roundtable last Friday with 2 DECC officials responsible for businesses getting Green Deal. Unfortunately they couldn't answer many of our questions. The interest rates are set by the Green Deal provider, so there will be no protection on what businesses can be charged. SBEM is also onlt a very rough guide to savings; so many commercial building Green Deals that in theory should hit the Golden Rule will in reality fail. Who is responsible when savings don't cover the cost of the loan? Sadly the DECC officials did not know!

KateSMumsnet (MNHQ) Wed 13-Feb-13 13:37:34

fadgers

Sorry i broke the in house rules i only registered today for the first time , just trying to help everybody save money with cost effective energy saving products which are almost unknown to most Brits . will somebody explain what is permissible and what is not

Hi fadgers, thanks for joining Mumsnet.

You can find out more about our site rules in our talk guidelines If you're interested in advertising on Mumsnet, please contact sales@mumsnet.com, as we do not allow people to advertise on our talk boards (or on webchats!)

Tianc Wed 13-Feb-13 13:40:40

Btw, apologies KateSMumsnet as my post has two actual questions - I'm not expecting an answer to either both. But I put it all in because your OP says Ed wants thoughts on a wide range of issues.

Screaminabdabs Wed 13-Feb-13 13:41:09

If my question about Fukushima isn't to be answered, could you answer Tianc's question about Smart Meters, please?

JonLew Wed 13-Feb-13 13:42:22

Am not sure if Ed's still here..would have asked him if the Green Deal is the left shoe and the right shoe will be the obligation on every householder to live in an EPC-level D and above house, or be penalised..the Green Deal financing mechanism is in place to make it possible for all to comply..

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 13:42:43

OneLieIn

Sorry change of question.

What are you doing about fuel poverty?

Energy prices up by 7%, 300,000 more homes on brink of fuel poverty, including mine

Dear OneLieIn,
Are you up today?
Seriously, fuel poverty is a critical issue, and we are very active.
First, we have had an independent analysis done of how we measure fuel poverty - and guess what it turns out we dont do that well. The real challenge is helping those people who live in fuel poverty year in year out - grinding fuel poverty - that affects their health, their kids' health, their kids' education, etc, etc. And the independent report suggests we need another measure that captures "the depth" of fuel poverty.
So - with much better measures, and by identifying those homes and families who are really in fuel poverty, our policies can be far more effective.
And we have loads of policies!
From warm home discount ( targeted at those on lowest incomes including senior citizens and disabled people) to cold weather payments (the coalition has permanently TREBLED these); from energy efficiency programmes like green deal; from the Energy Company Obligation, where we are forcing the energy companies to subsidise insulation and others measures to the tune of £1.3 billion a year, with around 50% of that targeted at the fuel poor; to our plans to make the energy market more competitive, to my push on "collective switching" or "energy co-oops" (see DECC's "cheaper Energy Together" competition), to our plans to insulate the UK long term from the effects of high fossial fuel prices.
And if you still dont thinjk I care deeply about fuel poverty, we are publishing a new fuel opoverty strategy later this year - the first in 12+ years - so we renew our focus on it, and that will invlve not just decc but treasury, department of health and others.
pklease dont believe everything you read in some newspapers!

finecheese Wed 13-Feb-13 13:42:59

Hello Mr Ed Davey,
As a mother who works for a young 'crowd-financing' company that provides the opportunity for ordinary people and families to invest in renewable energy projects I'd be interested to know the following:

I know the government is trying to get people more involved in community renewables - generally speaking, how do you see the government supporting these business models which both support community energy and provide the much needed economical growth within the UK?

PS - what did you have on your pancakes yesterday?

Thankyou!

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 13:45:54

WoodysMumJess

Hi Ed,

I like the idea of the Green Deal and want to take advantage but having contacted a Provider, been told there's a delay in the software. Half the providers I contacted never came back to me. This isn't a great start!

Also, from chatting to people (fellow Mums!), not that many people seem to know about it - I'm a bit of an Eco-geek - but do you think there needs to be more home owner education?

Hi Woody's Mum!
Sorry to hear you've had a problem - I guess there was always likely to be a few teething problems. Because this programme is really a new market, some of the firms have been waiting to see demand grow, before they finally press the "green" button and go - with training and investing. We've been monitoring closely how the "supply chain" of firms and trained employees has been growing - and the great news is that itis growing fast - so I hope all grteen geeks will find the green deal getting better and better

Chrisjw Wed 13-Feb-13 13:46:04

I have to say, although I don't agree with all the answers; it is refreshing to be able to engage directly with a senior politician on their responsibility area

UpOverAndOut Wed 13-Feb-13 13:47:00

blush can't remember where I read it now but glad to hear. I'm a big fan of them and look forward to seeing what happens later this year

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 13:47:31

Tianc

Ed

Most people don?t realise that the main purposes of smart meters include:

a) to charge higher prices at peak times and cause localised power cuts within the house

b) to enable utility companies to effectively cut customers off without going through the current check and justification mechanism of a magistrate?s court.

Purpose (a) is because the Dept for Energy and Climate Change (DECC) have decided to manage falling generation capacity by rationing power, rather than increasing capacity. But instead of using a per capita method of rationing, as with food during WWII, DECC has plumped for pure ability-to-pay.

The rich will continue using what they like when they like; the poor will face unaffordable prices at peak times, and localised power cuts switching off their freezer and washing machine. The working poor ? Clegg?s ?alarm clock Britain? - will be disproportionately impacted, as they have little choice about when to shower, cook, dry clothes, etc.

Why has there been no national debate about this?

Obviously the utility companies are delighted at being able to pass on peak prices, instead of averaging as now. It dumps their commercial risk onto the individual customer.

It?s less clear why DECC are supporting this method.

But then this is the same DECC which allows utility companies to charge more for the first so-many units and then discounts on the excess. Which is jolly nice in commercial terms of competing for high-usage customers, but has no place in reducing overall consumption.

Which brings me to (b). And indeed all the other lovely things packaged with Smart Meters to benefit the utility companies but which put customers at risk.

Like the facility to reprogram Smart Meters remotely, via internet and mobile phone technology.

Utility companies will be able to reprogram Smart Meters into prepayment meters, or cut supply completely, or restrict it to a trickle, without having to access the premises ? and therefore without asking permission from the customer or satisfying a magistrate.

They?ll promise not to be naughty, of course, but their track record isn?t convincing (utility co takes 854 out of a MNer?s account in breach of direct debit regulations and another doesn?t even know what meters are at MNer?s address. And these are hardly unusual.)

But this pales in comparison to the risk to critical national infrastructure of remote reprogramming, which makes every Smart Meter in the country vulnerable to everything from software-update failure a la NatWest, to Chinese state hackers. The government?s own Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure has warned continually about this.

There?s also the little matter of privacy, which I won?t try to cram in here. (See previous thread with detail and links to DECC documents and cybersecurity analyses: Anyone having a gas/leccy meter replaced with a Smart Meter? Something you need to know. )

Smart Meters, of a rather safer kind, could potentially have a role to play in reducing carbon footprint. and there is a valid discussion to be had about how we as a nation wish to ration essential goods like power.

But the Smart Meter package as currently envisaged is primarily about utility companies? bottom line, using DECC?s green agenda as cover. Why on earth are you playing along with this?

Dear Tianc
Sorry - you are COMPLETELY wrong.
In almost everything you type
The aim is to save people money. It will give them more control.

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 13:49:29

aliceb4

Hi Ed,
Thanks for coming to Mumsnet. This government promised to be the "greenest ever" but all the noise coming out of the Treasury and No. 10 including the appointment of environment minister, Owen Paterson, (who many see as a climate change denier) seems to indicate that they've had a massive change of heart. You are obviously committed to the Green agenda, however. Do you really feel that Cameron and Osborne are too?

(Oh and by way of tradition, what's your fave biscuit?)

The whole government is pledged to be the greenest government ever - it's a coalition commitment.
My really favourite biscuit is a fig roll - but I am partial to bourbons too. In fact, I'd better stop now....

EdwardDavey Wed 13-Feb-13 13:52:51

I'm told i have to go now - just when i was getting started! (Actually they want to take a photo of my eating a bourbon!)
Thanks for all the questions - sorry i couldn't answer the all.
My question to you is - will you please go and visit www.gov.uk/greendeal or ring 03001231234 (not all at once now), and find out how you can save energy, save money, save the planet and employ local people! What's stopping you?
And my question to Mumsnet is - will you look at our ideas around collective switching and co-operative energy? Why not organise for mumsnetters an energy switch to help everyone out there save money?
Best
ed

Tianc Wed 13-Feb-13 13:53:37

In that case, can I suggest people mosey over to my thread "Anyone having a gas/leccy meter replaced with a Smart Meter? Something you need to know", and follow the references to the DECC's own documents, ICO documents, etc. And I'd like to add this one from the European Data Protection Supervisor, since we're here.

Screaminabdabs Wed 13-Feb-13 14:21:05

Haven't read your thread yet, Tianc, but do you know there is a national UK campaign against smart meters?

stopsmartmeters.org.uk/

Glad to see another MNer concerned about this - will get over to your thread when I have time.

jesmeen Wed 13-Feb-13 21:11:18

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jesmeen Wed 13-Feb-13 21:12:25

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jesmeen Wed 13-Feb-13 21:12:37

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Thop Thu 14-Feb-13 13:17:23

A question regarding finance deals...
I really like the idea of the Green Deal but there is one thing that may put me off - If I wanted to buy back the loan early, if I have more money later or if the buyer of my house is not keen to buy with the loan in place, then the loan company has the right to charge for the all the interest they would have earned! I understand paying off a loan early looses the loan company money, but is this not favouring them too much?

Could I please urge for this to be reviewed so that it has the same consumer protection on charges as other loans?

MylinhMumsnet (MNHQ) Tue 26-Feb-13 12:26:54

armchairbackpacker

Regarding the GreenDeal. I had my survey done in December 2012. The cashback portal is now open but I cant register as I havent had my report back yet. My supplier said it is because the government software to produce the report isnt available yet. and I have queried this with another supplier who said the same (that the questions to decide the cost reduction in our energy were still not confirmed and until they are the software isnt available).

When will I get my report, I am desperate to get cracking with the GreenDeal and am a big supporter of the scheme but this delay is frustrating?

Thanks

Hello Armchairbackpacker - we've just been sent this response to your question from Ed Davey and the Green Deal team. Hope it's helpful! MNHQ

Ed Davey said:

"Hi Armchairbackpacker

We hope that your assessment report has now come through but, if not, we wanted to assure you that Green Deal assessment software is available to assessor organisations and has been since 5th December. Green Deal assessors are required to finalise green deal assessments within 14 days of the assessment taking place. We have spoken to a number of assessor organisations and where this hasn’t happened, we have asked them to re-do the assessment at no additional charge to the consumer.

Please do let us know if your assessor still hasn’t been able to do this for you, contact correspondence@decc.gsi.gov.uk"

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