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Dr Michael Mosley and Peta Bee: Live webchat - Monday 13 January, midday - 1pm.

(78 Posts)
RachelMumsnet (MNHQ) Fri 10-Jan-14 14:12:09

Dr Michael Mosley and co-author of Fast Exercise, Peta Bee are joining us on Monday 13 January to talk us through the practice and benefits of high intensity training.

In their book Fast Exercise, Dr Michael Mosley, a reluctant exerciser, and super-fit health journalist Peta Bee show how to safely do High Intensity Training and get the benefits – whatever your fitness level. Drawing on cutting edge research they show why high intensity training can be more effective than much longer periods of low-impact exercise. They also offer a range of workouts, of varying intensity – there is something here for everyone. As this fascinating book demonstrates, when it comes to exercise, less can be more.

Join the webchat on Monday at midday or post a question in advance to this thread.

Redbushytea Mon 13-Jan-14 15:51:10

"Your brain is quite good at protecting you from doing something stupid" - very funny, Mr Mosley. grin

Loved your inspirational answers, ta very much. Will deffo get the book.

Pippinlongsocks Mon 13-Jan-14 15:14:28

What do you define as enough rest in between work outs. I walk/run around 15k per week plus go to the gym on the other days. I have got into a habit of exercising every day in some form, making my rest day as having a walk at a fast pace. I am getting over a virus and my legs in particular feel like lead but I don't like resting and getting out of the habit of exercising as I love the benefits both physically and mentally but I fear I may have over done things. Can you advise on appropriate rest intervals please.

Thank you smile

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 13:05:51

Good bye! we are off to do some filming of the sort of exercises you can do before breakfast or in lunch period. No need to change!

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 13:05:19

Thank you for all of your great questions. We are off now....

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 13:02:46

Redbushytea

How can I overcome my reluctance to do short bursts of intense exercise? For example, on an exercise bike or rowing machine in the gym, it's much more pleasant just to keep plugging away at an easy speed. I know I need to up the pace for short bursts. But I don't want to.

blush grin

Use the fact that you will only be doing it for a short time as motivation. You can do a HIT session in the time it takes to boil a kettle!

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 12:58:56

MichaelMosley

RestingActress

So having been obese all my adult life and now mid 40s I fancy giving this a go but I'm worried that doing high intensity excercise is going to result in me keeling over with a heart attack. Obviously doing nothing will result in the same thing probably, but I'm a bit scared. Any words of wisdom?

Do the exercise programmes we suggest in the book, DO NOT JUST MAKE IT UP YOURSELF! The regimes we suggest have been tested in labs around the world. A DIY approach could end badly

Take things gradually as outlined in the book. Start with one minute of faster walking every day.

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:58:37

The risks when doing a novel form of exercise are likely to be pulling a muscle. Heart attack or stroke is very unlikely. The leading causes of stroke are smoking, obesity, lack of exercise, high blood pressure and stress

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:56:34

AuntPorridger

How do you know when you're overdoing the high intensity part of your workout if you don't have any way to measure your heart rate or performance? Aren't there potentially serious consequences to pushing yourself too hard without knowing what your limits are?

Your brain is quite good at protecting you from doing something stupid. You should start gradually and build up. I take my pulse at my wrist. You can also aim for an effort scale. If 1 is no effort and 10 is flat out, aim for 7-8 when doing HIT, 3-4 when recovering in between

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 12:56:12

Angeleno

Hi Michael and Peta,

Do you feel that there are dangers around fast exercise? I appreciate that it can be a great solution for some who are pressed for time and that there are possibly additional health benefits, but I can't help but think of the press surrounding Andrew Marr's stroke in 2013, which he had attributed directly to an intensive exercise regimen on a rowing machine. I can see how this type of exercise would be really beneficial for some but for others it could pose a threat of heart attacks and strokes which isn't a comforting thought. Do you have any advice for people who might be concerned about this? Is there a particular way of exercising to avoid these risks?

Many thanks thanks

Both the Stroke Association and British Heart Foundation recommend regular exercise as a preventative measure against the illnesses and say that doing nothing is far more risky to health. Andrew Marr's case was unusual as he had suffered two 'silent' strokes previously and was therefore vulnerable if undertaking any kind of exertion. Experts say that people who are vulnerable in this way could experience a stroke even when sneezing. Intensive exercise is as safe as any other form of activity if you progress slowly and seek medical advice if you are concerned.

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:52:53

RestingActress

So having been obese all my adult life and now mid 40s I fancy giving this a go but I'm worried that doing high intensity excercise is going to result in me keeling over with a heart attack. Obviously doing nothing will result in the same thing probably, but I'm a bit scared. Any words of wisdom?

Do the exercise programmes we suggest in the book, DO NOT JUST MAKE IT UP YOURSELF! The regimes we suggest have been tested in labs around the world. A DIY approach could end badly

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 12:51:47

AuntPorridger

How do you know when you're overdoing the high intensity part of your workout if you don't have any way to measure your heart rate or performance? Aren't there potentially serious consequences to pushing yourself too hard without knowing what your limits are?

Contrary to popular opinion, it's extremely difficult to push yourself too hard when exercising. We each have in-built mechanisms that tell our brain and bodies when we have had enough. Your body knows it's own limits. You would be unable to push yourself like an Olympian if you were physiologically incapable of doing so. That said, it is always important o have a medical check up before you start. The same is true for any form of exercise, even walking.

Angeleno Mon 13-Jan-14 12:51:39

Hi Michael and Peta,

Do you feel that there are dangers around fast exercise? I appreciate that it can be a great solution for some who are pressed for time and that there are possibly additional health benefits, but I can't help but think of the press surrounding Andrew Marr's stroke in 2013, which he had attributed directly to an intensive exercise regimen on a rowing machine. I can see how this type of exercise would be really beneficial for some but for others it could pose a threat of heart attacks and strokes which isn't a comforting thought. Do you have any advice for people who might be concerned about this? Is there a particular way of exercising to avoid these risks?

Many thanks thanks

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:49:52

teaandcustardcreams

Hi there,

What are the biggest myths you've heard about Fast Diet and Fast Exercise?

The biggest myth about Fast Exercise is that it is inherently dangerous. Yes, you need to do a gradual build up (we write about it), but high intensity training (HIT) is now used to help people recover from strokes and heart attacks. It is not just for the young and the fit. The new versions are specially designed for the older and the overweight. But they do need to be done properly. You can't just make it up

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 12:49:02

liveotherwise

Quickly scanning thread but want to get question in before you go. How does this fit into a lifestyle rather than being a quick weight loss hit? I don't want to diet/lose weight, I want to bea little fitter and looking into the future, prolong active lifestyle as long as possible. (I'm 43)

Likewise, I am not looking to lose weight but do it for fitness benefits. I am a lifelong runner, but it is HIT that really leads to impressive fitness gains. It is not intended to be a quick weight loss hit. do it regularly and you fitness and health will almost certainly benefit.

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 12:47:19

Calypso2

You say that Tabata and Insanity are only for people who are super fit, is this because it's dangerous or could I give Tabata a go? I'm not that in shape but I do cycle and eat healthily.

Any kind of exercise could be considered dangerous in certain circumstances. Even yoga has been linked to problems. The important thing is to progress gradually at increases of no more than 10 per cent per week in terms of intensity and duration. If you are unfit, best to start with fast walking or bursts of sprinting as you walk. Tabata is good, but any reputable trainer will tell you need to be reasonably fit to try it.

AuntPorridger Mon 13-Jan-14 12:47:04

How do you know when you're overdoing the high intensity part of your workout if you don't have any way to measure your heart rate or performance? Aren't there potentially serious consequences to pushing yourself too hard without knowing what your limits are?

liveotherwise Mon 13-Jan-14 12:46:53

Quickly scanning thread but want to get question in before you go. How does this fit into a lifestyle rather than being a quick weight loss hit? I don't want to diet/lose weight, I want to bea little fitter and looking into the future, prolong active lifestyle as long as possible. (I'm 43)

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:46:50

teaandcustardcreams

Hi there,

What are the biggest myths you've heard about Fast Diet and Fast Exercise?

That if you skip meals your body will go into Starvation Mode and try to hold onto fat. Actually what happens when you cut your calories for a day is that your metabolism speeds up. It only slows down when you have been on a severe diet for many weeks or months

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:45:31

Calypso2

You say that Tabata and Insanity are only for people who are super fit, is this because it's dangerous or could I give Tabata a go? I'm not that in shape but I do cycle and eat healthily.

Have a look on u tube and see if you can match what they suggest. It is really tough. I have tried it

teaandcustardcreams Mon 13-Jan-14 12:45:10

Hi there,

What are the biggest myths you've heard about Fast Diet and Fast Exercise?

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:44:31

littleblackcloud

Hi Michael, hi Peta

Can you tell me whether HIT has any impact on cholesterol levels? I'm slim and (reasonably!) fit, but have always had high cholesterol readings. Any thoughts?

Total cholesterol is misleading. There is 'good' cholesterol, HDL, and 'bad' cholesterol, LDL, and the important thing is the ratio between them. HIT raises HDL. Mine is now very high

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 12:43:33

zorione

What's the best thing to eat before doing HIIT? I usually work out on an empty stomach or have a banana an hour before I go to the gym but do you have any good tips for optimising your performance in this type of training?

Porridge has been proven time and again to be among the best pre-workout snacks, partly because of its relatively slow energy burn. You generally need to allow about 2-3 hours for a more substantial meal.

So having been obese all my adult life and now mid 40s I fancy giving this a go but I'm worried that doing high intensity excercise is going to result in me keeling over with a heart attack. Obviously doing nothing will result in the same thing probably, but I'm a bit scared. Any words of wisdom?

Calypso2 Mon 13-Jan-14 12:42:56

You say that Tabata and Insanity are only for people who are super fit, is this because it's dangerous or could I give Tabata a go? I'm not that in shape but I do cycle and eat healthily.

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