WEBCHAT GUIDELINES 1. One question per member plus one follow-up. 2. Keep your question brief. 3. Don't moan if your question doesn't get answered. 4. Do be civil/polite. More here.

Dr Michael Mosley and Peta Bee: Live webchat - Monday 13 January, midday - 1pm.

(78 Posts)
RachelMumsnet (MNHQ) Fri 10-Jan-14 14:12:09

Dr Michael Mosley and co-author of Fast Exercise, Peta Bee are joining us on Monday 13 January to talk us through the practice and benefits of high intensity training.

In their book Fast Exercise, Dr Michael Mosley, a reluctant exerciser, and super-fit health journalist Peta Bee show how to safely do High Intensity Training and get the benefits – whatever your fitness level. Drawing on cutting edge research they show why high intensity training can be more effective than much longer periods of low-impact exercise. They also offer a range of workouts, of varying intensity – there is something here for everyone. As this fascinating book demonstrates, when it comes to exercise, less can be more.

Join the webchat on Monday at midday or post a question in advance to this thread.

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 12:09:11

Cat98

My husband and I do the 5:2 WOE and love it.
My q is around the health benefits - I read somewhere that it may increase the risk of diabetes in women of normal weight. I know this study had a v small sample but I wondered what your thoughts are on this? Do you know if there are plans for any more research into this and health benefits?
Thank you.

Think you might be confusing this with the response (or lack of it) some people get from aerobic exercise of the long, slow plodding variety. Through DNA tests Michael has found out that he is a 'non-responder to that sort of exercise. I am what scientists call a super-responder. Unfortunately there is no way that you change your pre-programmed response to workouts. However, Fast Exercise has benefits for everyone and has been shown to have many health benefits even for those who, like Michael, find they previously slogged away with no gain.

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:09:36

radiatormesh

Part of the goal of an exercise program is often to burn calories. Other than by boosting muscle mass (and therefore metabolism), how does HIT do this? However hard you work, you simply won't burn enough calories in a short session to make any difference to weight loss.

In addition, HIT is high intensity. The American College of Exercise claims that drop-out rates from vigorous intensity exercise are twice as high as from moderate intensity programs: isn't it better to encourage people to do something of a more moderate intensity to which they are which they are more likely to commit long-term?

The way HIT works is three fold. It increases the number and the efficiency of your mitochondria, the tiny power plants you have in every cell in your body. These turn fat and sugar into energy. It also leads to the production of hormones that target fat cells. Finally it suppresses appetite (over 24 hours); standard excise tends to promote appetite.

There are lots of idfferent forms

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 12:11:38

The ACSM findings were based on longer-duration vigorous workouts. HIT is MORE likely to have a high retention rate as people do not have to devote huge amounts of time to it. Sports scientists agree that you can burn as many calories in a short, sharp session as you would in a longer session.

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:12:49

There are lots of different forms of intense exercise; the ones in our book, Fast Exercise, have been specially designed and tested by experts to be safe and effective, even if you are older, unfit, diabetic. Lots of intense programmes out there (Tabata, Insanity) are only suitable for the super fit

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 12:14:01

Slubberdegullion

Hi Michael,
I remember watching your programme last year (? was it last year) on this subject, and very interesting it was too. Thank God I thought after watching it, I really don't ever have to join a gym ever again. Revolting moist, sweaty spandex places <shudder>

So my question is similar to hopefulchums. I remember from the programme that having a really high step count per day was also seen as a perfectly good and valid way to help with maintaining a good weight, although I can't remember if it helps cardiovascular 'health', in terms of adding lots of years back to your life.

Because of my job and my dog I walk a gazzilion steps everyday. It's really quite impressive let me tell you, my step count wink. Do I really, really need to add HIIT to my daily routine too? What added health benefits will I get?

If you re looking to improve muscle tone, then my advice would be to do a combination of the Fast Fitness (running, cycling, rowing-basedHIT) and the Fast Strength circuits we've outlined in the book. The later include body weight conditioning exercises that are a great way to improve muscle tone and strength. Ideally do the 7 minute circuit 3 times a week on non-consecutive days.

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:16:19

[quote Cat98]My husband and I do the 5:2 WOE and love it.
My q is around the health benefits - I read somewhere that it may increase the risk of diabetes in women of normal weight. I know this study had a v small sample but I wondered what your thoughts are on this? Do you know if there are plans for any more research into this and health benefits?

Hi Cat98, there are some concerns about 5:2 and diabetes based on a couple of animal studies done a decade ago. The big human trials all suggest that it is safe, effective and reduces your risk of type 2 diabetes. Fast Exercise also reduces your risk by increasing insulin sensitivity. Can do it running, walking, cycling. Important thing is to get pulse up. Also really important to get off your bottom and move every 30 minutes, if only for one minute

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 12:16:38

radiatormesh

Part of the goal of an exercise program is often to burn calories. Other than by boosting muscle mass (and therefore metabolism), how does HIT do this? However hard you work, you simply won't burn enough calories in a short session to make any difference to weight loss.

In addition, HIT is high intensity. The American College of Exercise claims that drop-out rates from vigorous intensity exercise are twice as high as from moderate intensity programs: isn't it better to encourage people to do something of a more moderate intensity to which they are which they are more likely to commit long-term?

radiatormesh

Part of the goal of an exercise program is often to burn calories. Other than by boosting muscle mass (and therefore metabolism), how does HIT do this? However hard you work, you simply won't burn enough calories in a short session to make any difference to weight loss.

In addition, HIT is high intensity. The American College of Exercise claims that drop-out rates from vigorous intensity exercise are twice as high as from moderate intensity programs: isn't it better to encourage people to do something of a more moderate intensity to which they are which they are more likely to commit long-term?

radiatormesh

Part of the goal of an exercise program is often to burn calories. Other than by boosting muscle mass (and therefore metabolism), how does HIT do this? However hard you work, you simply won't burn enough calories in a short session to make any difference to weight loss.

In addition, HIT is high intensity. The American College of Exercise claims that drop-out rates from vigorous intensity exercise are twice as high as from moderate intensity programs: isn't it better to encourage people to do something of a more moderate intensity to which they are which they are more likely to commit long-term?

radiatormesh

Part of the goal of an exercise program is often to burn calories. Other than by boosting muscle mass (and therefore metabolism), how does HIT do this? However hard you work, you simply won't burn enough calories in a short session to make any difference to weight loss.

In addition, HIT is high intensity. The American College of Exercise claims that drop-out rates from vigorous intensity exercise are twice as high as from moderate intensity programs: isn't it better to encourage people to do something of a more moderate intensity to which they are which they are more likely to commit long-term?

radiatormesh

Part of the goal of an exercise program is often to burn calories. Other than by boosting muscle mass (and therefore metabolism), how does HIT do this? However hard you work, you simply won't burn enough calories in a short session to make any difference to weight loss.

In addition, HIT is high intensity. The American College of Exercise claims that drop-out rates from vigorous intensity exercise are twice as high as from moderate intensity programs: isn't it better to encourage people to do something of a more moderate intensity to which they are which they are more likely to commit long-term?

radiatormesh

Part of the goal of an exercise program is often to burn calories. Other than by boosting muscle mass (and therefore metabolism), how does HIT do this? However hard you work, you simply won't burn enough calories in a short session to make any difference to weight loss.

In addition, HIT is high intensity. The American College of Exercise claims that drop-out rates from vigorous intensity exercise are twice as high as from moderate intensity programs: isn't it better to encourage people to do something of a more moderate intensity to which they are which they are more likely to commit long-term?

Thanks for your comments. we have clearly outlined in the book that general movement is essential if Fast Exercise is to be effective. We are both big fans of standing, stair-bounding and walking everywhere rather than taking the car. Add Fast Exercise to the equation and it's a winning combination. It is, after all, the type of training adopted by all top sports people (albeit they do far greater amounts).

Calypso2 Mon 13-Jan-14 12:18:29

Hi there, is there any particular time of day you should do the exercise. My problem is fitting it in with work and the kids - so I love the idea but wondered wehther it works best if you do the exercise at a particular time of day. Also are there any exercises you can do indoors? I'm thinking I could do something in my lunch hour at work or in the house as we don't have a park close by and it's sometimes tricky to get out the house.

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:18:40

I love steps, a fantastic way of getting a workout. You burn .25 calories for every step, but the important thing is it gets your pulse up. I work on 7th floor and try to jog up every day. We include a stairs workout in book. As ever, start gradually. I find it sooo depressing watching people stand on escalators

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 12:19:02

Jcee

Its taken me an age to get to the point where I exercise regularly and dont fob myself off with excuses not to go. I like to swim and have been working on technique over the last 6 months, so now I'm swimming much better and have almost got my breathing and strokes in sync, next steps are to build my endurance.

I'm wondering whether I just try fast exercise instead of slogging away at increasing lengths over the next few months and if so, how can I do it with swimming?

Believe me, a lot of us like plodding away at a gentle pace. The reason? It is easy. There is no discomfort. The downside is that results take a long time to happen. If you are serious about getting fitter, then add a few 10 second bursts to your regular swim, gradually building up to 30 second bursts. You will be amazed at the difference and will reap the rewards of boosted health.

Laska42 Mon 13-Jan-14 12:19:55

Hello DR M , thanks so much for 5:2, ! ive been doing it since August 2012.. 2 days after the programme and after many years of ultimately unsuccesful diets.. It has changed my life !,

But , I HATE exercise! (though know i need to do it ), but im 56, never really done much, apart from aerobics classes ive always given up . I had a go at C25K which brought on massive back spasms which took months to go away !

Really, Im a lost cause .. I just prefer to read grin

But realistically , what can i do , as an absolute novice? How about hill walking? (lots of hills on my doorstep and I like getting out ) I also have a Step (from years ago ) and a Trampoline .. I have a bike too! . But I live in a rural area and road cycling this tim eof year is a bit tricky , and no gym nearby ( but I know wouldnt go anyway !) .

Any advice How can a slug like me start and then actually maintain this ? I know i have to like it or I wont maintain it .. How can I learn to like exercise ..
?
(or am I really a lost cause? )

Ive list 24lbs on 5;2 and woul d like to lose a bout 7lbs more
thanks ..

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 12:22:02

Doyouthinktheysaurus

So I'm a runner, normally do 30 miles a week. I have recently started speed work, so faster running for shorter periods, normally a mile or half a mile faster than steady pace with a short recovery.

My question is how would high intensity training fit in with an endurance running programme for someone like me, whose exercise regime consists solely of running?

Please don't suggest the gym because I don't belong to one and don't intend to change that.....

Doyouthinktheysaurus

So I'm a runner, normally do 30 miles a week. I have recently started speed work, so faster running for shorter periods, normally a mile or half a mile faster than steady pace with a short recovery.

My question is how would high intensity training fit in with an endurance running programme for someone like me, whose exercise regime consists solely of running?

Please don't suggest the gym because I don't belong to one and don't intend to change that.....

Doyouthinktheysaurus

So I'm a runner, normally do 30 miles a week. I have recently started speed work, so faster running for shorter periods, normally a mile or half a mile faster than steady pace with a short recovery.

My question is how would high intensity training fit in with an endurance running programme for someone like me, whose exercise regime consists solely of running?

Please don't suggest the gym because I don't belong to one and don't intend to change that.....

Great news that you have perfected your technique - it can make such a difference to the amount you can achieve in a workout. We've included a section on swimming in the book and, yes, it is possible to incorporate HIT principles into your swim. If you swim in a 25 metre pool, try doing a couple of lengths warm up and then a length flat out. Recover with another 2-3 gentle lengths swimming and then repeat 4 times followed by a cool down.

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:22:23

Really interesting study in the book on the effects on the human body of simply standing a bit more. Makes you feel good about having to stand up when you are commuting!

Laska42 Mon 13-Jan-14 12:25:20

BTW I do walk , but have to sit at a desk all day ..

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:26:11

Laska42

Hello DR M , thanks so much for 5:2, ! ive been doing it since August 2012.. 2 days after the programme and after many years of ultimately unsuccesful diets.. It has changed my life !,

But , I HATE exercise! (though know i need to do it ), but im 56, never really done much, apart from aerobics classes ive always given up . I had a go at C25K which brought on massive back spasms which took months to go away !

Really, Im a lost cause .. I just prefer to read grin

But realistically , what can i do , as an absolute novice? How about hill walking? (lots of hills on my doorstep and I like getting out ) I also have a Step (from years ago ) and a Trampoline .. I have a bike too! . But I live in a rural area and road cycling this tim eof year is a bit tricky , and no gym nearby ( but I know wouldnt go anyway !) .

Any advice How can a slug like me start and then actually maintain this ? I know i have to like it or I wont maintain it .. How can I learn to like exercise ..
?
(or am I really a lost cause? )

Ive list 24lbs on 5;2 and woul d like to lose a bout 7lbs more
thanks ..

Hi there, I am also 56b and hate exercise. This is a book for people like you just as much as it is for people like Peta who love exercise. Yes, hill walking is fab. Any form of walking is fab. Get a pedometre and see how many steps you do a day. Then try to increase by, say, 1000, over a week. You should be aiming to hit 10,000 steps a day, though most people do 5000. I never go the gym, i always walk when i can. There are a range of simple exercises which you can build on and which need no equipment apart from a chair.

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:28:10

I am a great believer in the need to keep a track of things so you can record progress. Lots of evidence that people who keep an honest food diary lose more weight than those who don't. Similar is true of exercise

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 12:30:34

Calypso2

Hi there, is there any particular time of day you should do the exercise. My problem is fitting it in with work and the kids - so I love the idea but wondered wehther it works best if you do the exercise at a particular time of day. Also are there any exercises you can do indoors? I'm thinking I could do something in my lunch hour at work or in the house as we don't have a park close by and it's sometimes tricky to get out the house.

There's a lot of research on the best time of day to exercise. Most point to mid-afternoon - and that is when most world records have been broken in sport. But some recent studies have suggested morning workouts are better. So, there's no definitive rule and much depends on your lifestyle demands. I used to favour early morning exercise but that became impossible once I was a mum. Now I fit my exercise in during school hours or even on the school run - walk, sprint, walk, sprint all the way home is a good one. All of the Fast Strength sessions outlined in the book can be done at home. Skipping is another good one. And stair-climing is fantastic.

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:30:42

Laska42

BTW I do walk , but have to sit at a desk all day ..

Most of us do. The research is very clear that you can reduce your risk of heart disease and diabetes by getting up every 30 minutes and going for short stroll. Take the stair instead of the lift. Go and chat rather than email. When you feel hunger at 4pm, go for a stroll rather than a muffin (500 calories) or bar of chocolate (250 cals). Cravings pass. Honestly

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:34:11

If you want to lose weight and get maximal health advantages then it is the combination of Fast Diet and Fast Exercise that will work best. When you exercise in the fasted state then the exercise will help make you less hungry and because you have less sugar running round your system your body has to turn to its stores, ie fat. People who exercise in fasted state burn more fat

Laska42 Mon 13-Jan-14 12:35:54

well, im just about to walk out to book shop and lok for the book ..ill try and go faster ! If its exercise with no sit ups I might make it ..

I thought maybe about starting by stepping on the step and using weights (i have some 2kg ones ) , or running on the spot on my trampoline?

Do you think you can get any real workout on a trampoline (its not one of those really small ones)? , i find i can get a bit out of breath on it , but not like when im running up and down starirs , though its easier on the back and slightly dodgy hip joint i find ..

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 12:36:32

Doyouthinktheysaurus

So I'm a runner, normally do 30 miles a week. I have recently started speed work, so faster running for shorter periods, normally a mile or half a mile faster than steady pace with a short recovery.

My question is how would high intensity training fit in with an endurance running programme for someone like me, whose exercise regime consists solely of running?

Please don't suggest the gym because I don't belong to one and don't intend to change that.....

Hi there, as a runner and coach myself I use HIT-style sessions a lot. Indeed most top runners' training programmes are based almost entirely on the principles. The half mile repetitions you describe are fine, but you would benefit from even shorter bursts of faster speed - even marathon runners use this approach. One of my favourite sessions is 10 x 60 seconds around the park. Or 8 x 60 metres uphill with a walk back down. Get your mileage in on the warm up or the days between.

zorione Mon 13-Jan-14 12:38:48

What's the best thing to eat before doing HIIT? I usually work out on an empty stomach or have a banana an hour before I go to the gym but do you have any good tips for optimising your performance in this type of training?

alicethecactus Mon 13-Jan-14 12:38:59

Does the Fast Diet work for stuff like sit ups or squats? If so, what's the best thing to do?

littleblackcloud Mon 13-Jan-14 12:39:19

Hi Michael, hi Peta

Can you tell me whether HIT has any impact on cholesterol levels? I'm slim and (reasonably!) fit, but have always had high cholesterol readings. Any thoughts?

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:39:48

My test for whether a new diet book is dodgy or not is how much weight they claim you can lose in a week. If they claim "5lbs" then it is almost certainly misleading, as much of that will be water and muscle.
1 lb of fat contain 3500 calories. The average woman consumes less than 12,000 calories a week. So even if you cut your food consumption in half you would be lucky to lose more than 2lbs. If you ate nothing for a week it would be 4lbs. If you ran for one hour a day, 7 days a week, that would burn 1lb of fat. So the only way to lose 5lbs is eat nothing and run an hour a day.... Best goal to set yourself is around 1lb a week

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now