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Live webchat with nutritionist Jane Clarke, Tues 8 Feb, 12.30pm-1.30pm. UPDATE - Jane returning to answer questions she missed tonight - Tuesday 15th Feb 7.30

(118 Posts)
GeraldineMumsnet (MNHQ) Thu 03-Feb-11 10:27:02

We're delighted that nutritionist Jane Clarke is joining us for a webchat at 12.30pm on Tues 8 Feb.

Jane, who is a qualified dietitian, says her mission is to change people's lives through the power of nourishment.

Her latest book, Nourish, explains nutritional needs at every stage of life - children, teens, adulthood, pregnancy, middle age and over-60s.

She runs two dietetic practices (her specialist practice assists patients who have cancer and their families) and advises some of Britain's leading sportspeople.

Grab this opportunity to quiz an expert nutritionist, and join Jane on Tuesday. But if the timing doesn't work for you, post your question here as usual.

jonicomelately Thu 03-Feb-11 10:37:18

Hello Jane.

I cook most things from scratch and we eat all of our meals together. We have lots of seasonal food, lots of fresh fruit and vegetables and bread and pasta (on the whole) tends to be brown. We don't have any fizzy drinks, it's either milk or fruit juice.

What I want to ask relates to my DS' (aged 9 and 4) intake of sugar. They probably eat one or two sweet things a day. Usually I try to keep it down to a smallish thing but I see other parents restrict their children's intake of sugar and wonder if I should do the same.

My children are fit and healthy. They are very tall and lean and do massive amounts of exercise every week. They have active lifestyles probably more akin to children twenty years ago than kids who sit at a computer all the time. DS1 (aged 9) has an enormous appetite. I mean truly enormous shock

I think there is no problem as they need the calories to burn off and clean their teeth regularly.

Am I doing the wrong thing? After all, we were allowed sugar when we were children and weren't fat.

GreatGooglyMoogly Thu 03-Feb-11 11:31:56

Could the reason I am often tired and need naps be that my diet is lacking in something, or even that I don't drink enough water? I have had blood tests and am neither anaemic nor diabetic. Many Thanks.

ImFab Thu 03-Feb-11 12:45:39

I have been following the Pig to Twig diet for 3 months and have lost 16lbs with 2 further stone to lose. For the last few days I have been feeling sick, faint and out of it. Finger prick test was 3.6. Blood pressure fine. I ate well. Lots of meat, fish, leaves, cheese with my daily treat of sugar free jelly and double cream. What am I doing wrong and what can I do in the future? TIA.

goldenticket Thu 03-Feb-11 12:58:20

I suffer terribly with PMT and was wondering whether there was anything in my diet that was making it worse or conversely, whether there was anything diet-wise that could help.

Also (I know MNHQ, sorry grin), ds has gone into Y7 and I'm finding his activity levels have plummeted but his appetite has increased (and he's now looking ever so slightly plump). Trouble is, he has a card for his school dinners but is opting for high carb stuff (wraps, bread, cookies etc) and is then coming home and veering towards the biscuit tin. Is this a normal thing at this age i.e. he needs more carbs for a growth spurt or something? Or is he just greedy?? grin Can you give me some quick snack ideas for ravenous 12 year olds and also recommend a snack bar that is the least worst option IYKWIM for break times?

Thank you very much smile

goldenticket Thu 03-Feb-11 12:59:23

Healthy snack ideas I should have said, ideally that he could fix easily himself when coming in from school.

Starbear Thu 03-Feb-11 16:22:05

Jane. At 48 years I am returning to exercise. I think I've got my diet all wrong before exercise.I often feel constipated &/or farty blush
I also have Fibroids. confused
Q1 Can you give me some tips on what to eat on a day I plan to go to the gym.
I will be going after work at about 6pm on somedays. On another around 10am. I swim on a Friday at about 5pm.
Q2 What should I eat?
Q3 At what time?
really grateful for a reply Sorry I can't log on on the day as I'll be at work.smile

AtYourCervix Thu 03-Feb-11 17:24:21

Hello.
DD2 is 12 and hasn't eaten a fruit or vegetable since she was 1. How she hasn't got scurvy is a mystery,

over the years we have tried the usual tasting, blending, hiding, bribery, with no success at all.

She only eats beige stuff (carbs, chicken, rubbish) and possibly has aspergers.

Any ideas?

ByThePowerOfGreyskull Thu 03-Feb-11 17:25:57

Hi Jane,
I have a seemingly healthy diet, fruit or veg at every meal, I don't cut out any food groups and try to have a balance of thirds on my plate.

However, I am a very windy person blush (both ends) and I get huge cramps from time always in the same place - just slightly in from my right hip bone.

I haven't yet managed to work out what it could be.. any tips?

scottishmummy Thu 03-Feb-11 20:32:41

Jane,are you concerned about disreputable nutritionists/nutrition therapist who are not HPC registered dietitians and give bad advice

Jammygal Thu 03-Feb-11 21:39:11

Jane ....any tips for incorporating more fruit into ds's diet. He will eat peeled pears and sometimes apples (he prefers them cooked) but that is it! No grapes, melon, oranges etc. I have tried frozen fruit, dried fruit. His sister will eat most fruit so it is always around but he abstains ;(

Also I have anaemia that has not improved for years.....do you have any tips to improve iron intake. I eat dried apricots and have a juicer so sometimes juice beetroot.

Thanks in advance x

aristocat Thu 03-Feb-11 21:45:57

hello Jane
do you have any of your own TV shows in the pipeline ..... thank you

Rindercella Fri 04-Feb-11 01:12:34

Hi Jane

Unfortunately I won't be online when you are on this webchat but I would really appreciate your advice.

My DH has advanced prostate cancer (spread to lymph nodes & widespread bone metastases). He has been to the Penny Brohn clinc and we are trying to follow the Bristol Diet to help him as much as we can. Unfortuantely he sometimes struggles to eat due to his illness and treatment. I cook everything from scratch for him, with lots of lentils, vegetables, (little) fish and occasional chicken. He has totally cut out diary from his diet and has now started to eat gluten free bread.

What other advice would you give? In your experience is this diet helpful? If so, how can it help? Is there anything else I could be doing to help him? He sometimes (actually, frequently) finds food very difficult to digest. Do you have any advice on how better this could be managed?

I know my husband's cancer will not be cured, but what can help to make him more comfortable and his life more bearable?

MNHQ, I understand that I have asked more than one question, but I'm desperate.

SkipToTheEnd Fri 04-Feb-11 11:52:53

Hi Jane,

I am Vegan and my son is 21 months and also Vegan. Am I really doing him some serious harm as my family seem to suggest?

Our diet is very well balanced (I believe) but he is slow to gain weight and smaller then average. Is this because of his diet? He seems perfectly healthy to me and is rarely ill.

Thanks

HattiFattner Fri 04-Feb-11 13:10:37

my son is an athlete - swimmer - and completes at county level. He is 11. Given that he is an athlete and also just about to hit puberty, how should I be adjusting his diet. AT the moment we struggle to fill him, even with carbs and plenty of sugar. He eats a wide variety of fruit and veg, plenty of dairy (esp after swimming) and is a committed carnivore.

Our diets are fat rich also (butter, cream etc) as everyone but me are skinny malinkies.

Any advice on feeding athletic kids and skinny kids?

HannahHack Fri 04-Feb-11 13:19:02

How can we convince schools that introduce overly restrictive rules are unnesessary. For example, I have a problem with them removing food from lunch boxes based on a silly set of nutritional rules.

Hello Jane, I have read one of your books a long while ago, and found it very useful. I am wondering if you have any advice on how to overcome sugar addiction. I can't eat one biscuit - I eat 10. Should I be cutting out refined sugar completely?

SupremeDalek Fri 04-Feb-11 14:56:21

Hello Jane

I have been left gluten and dairy intolerant by treatment for cancer, and have a colostomy. The latter means I have to make sure I don't eat too much fibre either. I used to eat lots of nuts, beans, lentils and pulses and I now find these a bit too windy (which can be uncomfortable as well as a tad on the noisy side).

Any suggestions of healthy, gluten-free, dairy-free, low-fibre sources or protein for me? I'm not a big fan of red meat ;). Are there any beans, pulses or grains which are easier to tolerate?

And a I can only have one question I'd like to back up Rindercella's question about your views on the Bristol diet.

dietstartstmoz Fri 04-Feb-11 15:04:21

Hello Jane,
My Ds aged 3.5 is having some assessments for autism, but the problem we're trying to get help with at the moment is his constant runny poo. He has recently had some blood tests for food allergies and all came back normal. He does have a peanut allergy.
He has very runny poo at least 3 times a day, on a bad day (like last week)7/8 times a day. We are trying to toilet train and this makes it impossible.
I have been googling toddler diarrhoea but find advice contradictory. He does not have undigested food in his poo, it's just a diarrhoea consistency.
Any advice on what to do? What to try to eliminate/increase/avoid? He eats lots of bread (toast, sandwiches) and dairy (milk,cheese) but is otherwise very healthy. Please help? Thanks

I really wish you had put 'dietitian' in the title, rather than 'nutritionist'. Given that one is a regulated profession and one is something that you can call yourself on a whim.

My question for Jane is to ask what she thinks about people who call themselves 'nutritionists'?

sfxmum Fri 04-Feb-11 18:33:53

Hi Jane, many thanks for the book Body Foods for women it started me on my journey to try and manage PCOS to try and conceive, dd nearly 6 nowgrin

now I will need inspiration to keep and gain new habits to avoid Diabetes in middle age

any ideas? inspiration? things I should really keep in mind?

it is hard work keeping to the low carb route by I guess it is still the best was?

IngridBergmann Fri 04-Feb-11 19:44:32

Hi Jane,

my best friend was treated by a specialist in nutrition after a cancer diagnosis. She survived nine months and then sadly died.

I cannot help but feel that in her desperate situation she was obviously unlikely to benefit from conventional medicine or dietary changes, and she made extreme dietary changes on the advice of this person - so I think really he ought not have taken the money of her family and given her and them false hope that she might be cured.

I am wondering what your thoughts are in terms of treating cancer patients with a dire prognosis - should one tell then that they are likely to be cured, as a positive reinforcement, or should one tell them honestly that they might feel less sick on a certain diet but it will not save them?

Apologies for the dark tone of my question; it has been bothering me an awful lot.

Thankyou.

jonicomelately Fri 04-Feb-11 19:55:27

I asked a question earlier but I've just realised who you are (from the telly grin)

I've a personal question. Feel free to ignore but I remember you adopted a daughter from India. I recall you talking about her and it seemed like a lovely story smile Just wondered how you both are? As I said, feel free to ignore smile

Aonach Fri 04-Feb-11 23:29:55

I just wanted to say that as a Dietitian I so pleased that Mumsnet are using a credible person and not a 'nutritionist' . Like Trilian I wish you had put it in the title thought.

Nutritionists are entirely unregulated where dietitians have studied between 4 and 6 years at uni with clinical placements and are HPC regulated to only provide evidence based advice.

Well done mumsnet and Jane for raising the profile of Dietitians.

SameAsYou Fri 04-Feb-11 23:32:18

Hi Jane

I have Psoriasis and advised to reduce dairy. I don't really have that much dairy other than tea or coffee.

Please can you advise what other foods would be good to eat. Or any supplements.

Thanks You

dinkystinky Sat 05-Feb-11 07:05:01

Jane - DS1 is in reception at school and appears to be subsisting on cheese and pickle sandwiches and diluted juice for lunch during the week (as its what he asks for each day) and a balanced meal with protein, carbs, veg and fruit or yoghurt for pudding in the evenings. I'm trying to get him to branch out but what would your suggestions be for an ideal (nutrition wise) lunchbox lunch for a primary school age child?

tulipe Sat 05-Feb-11 15:58:47

Jane I wonder if I am going too far by giving nuts to my child.
DD2 is on cmp and soya free diet (highly intolerant) and lately she becomes red on her cheeks and hands and has a bit of eczema when eating almond or coconut (no more) and the following day she is back to normal.
Is she at risk of developping nut allergy and should I completely remove nuts from her diet?

dittany Sat 05-Feb-11 16:50:16

Hello Jane, another cancer question.

My mother has just had an operation to have a large liposarcoma from her leg removed. Just wondering what sort of diet she should be thinking about having in the future. Also she's likely to be having a course of radiotherapy. Are there any good foods to be eating during that process?

IngridBergmann Sat 05-Feb-11 19:04:02

Thanks for clarifying that, Aonach.
I'm not sure how accredited this guy was, Harley street etc. French chap, you might hazard a guess...anyway...good to know the difference.

IngridBergmann Sat 05-Feb-11 19:11:22

M.D., D.T.M., H.M.F.Hom are the quals listed. No idea what they mean.

Duhart Sat 05-Feb-11 21:23:43

Hi Jane

My DH has IBS with diarrhea, following a long period when probable giardiasis went undiagnosed.
He felt nauseous for a very long time and lost lots of weight before trying an exclusion diet. He is now able to eat essentially chicken/fish, white rice, potatoes, rice milk, goat's milk and cheese, but he avoids wheat, other dairy and anything high in fibre or too acidic. This means most fruit and veg are out,

We are concerned about the long term effects of a very low fibre diet. My question is - should he be trying to include more veg and fibre in his diet - even if it aggravates or makes him uncomfortable?

Duhart Sat 05-Feb-11 21:24:59

whoops, meant to add that he seems ok with carrots and bananas, but that's it.

Rindercella Sat 05-Feb-11 23:19:15

Hi again Jane (and MN, please excuse my extra question)

Since posting my initial question, we have found out that DH's PSA levels have shot through the roof again (now 1400) and so his oncologist is taking him off the hormone therapy and he will be starting chemotherapy shortly.

With this in mind, what are the key dietary recommendations you can make to help someone through the physical effects of chemo?

Thank you.

I'm still interested in your answers to my initial questions though <greedy> smile

BellyMonster Sun 06-Feb-11 12:45:39

Hi Jane

My daughter is 5 1/2 months old, is it ok to give her small amounts of cows milk in her food? And should I wait until she is 6 months old to give her protein?

MotherMountainGoat Sun 06-Feb-11 15:38:05

Some really good questions here - I'm also interested in the matter of getting reluctant children to eat more vitamins and less sugar.

My main question: I have had chronic pain caused by endometriosis for many years (confirmed by laparoscopy). There is clearly a link to my bowel - endometriosis cells have been found on the bowel wall, and on the few occasions where my bowel was completely empty, ie just before an operation, I have been completely pain free (sorry to all others if TMI). Given those considerations, what dietary recommendations could you make? I've tried converting to soya milk but have noticed no improvement.

One rather annoying woman from a self-help group insists that the solution is eating three hot meals a day - she says there is something about eating hot food that helps with pain management. I suspect this is unfounded, and don't see how any old hot food is somehow better than a lovely fresh salad - surely there are more nutrients in raw food? Could you confirm that she is talking tosh, from a nutritional point of view?

philmassive Sun 06-Feb-11 15:58:07

Hi Jane, my ds is 7 and will only eat an extremely limited selection of foods - sausages, pasta, olives, orange juice, steak, chicken, ketchup, bread, tuna, cheese and tomato pizza, and rubbish like crisps and sweets. He doesn't eat any fruit or vegetables in their proper form and he steadfastly refuses to try new things and even sometimes refuses familiar things if they look different or have a different texture.
I do try to buy the best versions of what he will eat like high meat content sausages and organic ketchup but I know he must be enormously lacking nutritionally and I think he must often be hungry and bored by such a limited diet. He won't eat versions of the foods he does like ie he eats pasta and tuna but won't have tuna and pasta bake. He hates 'wet' food.
Do you have any tips to encourage him to try new foods and would you recommend a vitamin supplement for him? Also from reading on here other people's experiences I do wonder if he has some sort of disorder. Can you explain how I could go about finding out if this is the case?
Thanks

Jcee Sun 06-Feb-11 20:12:33

Hi Jane

I have your Yummy Baby book and found it really useful whilst weaning DD, now 13mo, and lots of your recipes have become family favourites.

I recently returned to full-time work and DD is picking up all the bugs at nursery and kindly passing them to me.

She is doing ok but I've had a cold since Christmas which I can't seem to shake off and, as a result, I'm feeling permanently ill and knackered under the weather and generally run down.

Any advice on what to eat to build my immunity and pep myself up?

Thanks

FunnysInTheGarden Sun 06-Feb-11 22:06:10

Hi Jane. Always loved your no nonsense approach to food. So how come they replaced you with that idiot John Briffa at The Observer? I followed your columns avidly, but hate The Biffa's rather holier than thou take on 'What's In Your Basket' I mean, will nothing please the man? 'Ooooh porridge........you do know that it will raise your blood sugar and then cause it to crash with hideous consequenses don't you' In the common parlance of MN FFS.

So Jane, when are you coming back? We need you!

lottiejenkins Mon 07-Feb-11 11:44:51

Hi Jane, my son can't have additives as it affects his behaviour......... I have trouble understanding the labels on packaging........... advise please!!

swerve Mon 07-Feb-11 13:10:14

Hi Jane,

I came to mumsnet to get some ideas for lunchboxes and see that you're on tomorrow. Do you have any suggestions beyond cheese sarnies and pasta salad? would sausage rolls be so terrible? or maybe sausage and veg rolls??

inthequeue Mon 07-Feb-11 14:11:48

Hi Jane,

I have had several miscarriages over the last year (diagnosed with over-active natural killer cells, sub-clinical hypothyroid and Factor V Leiden), and the only time that I successfully carried a pregnancy I was on a very low carb diet.

Even when not low-carbing I generally eat a healthy diet, with very few sugary foods or ready meals.

I wanted to ask whether you believe that there such thing as an optimal fertility diet?

Thanks smile

MarniesMummy Mon 07-Feb-11 14:20:27

Hello Jane,
My 7 year old daughter constantly asks if she can become vegetarian.

I'm not against the idea per se but I have no idea how to feed a vegetarian child (I am not vegetarin myself) in such a way as to ensure that her diet contains everything that she requires and so that I am not risking her future health.

What are your views on child vegetarians and can you give any advice or direct me to a reliable source from which I can find out how to ensure I feed her healthily and ideas on how to feed her.

Thank you.

mousymouse Mon 07-Feb-11 15:17:34

Hello Jane,
what do you think of vitamin supplements for (small children).
a paed (in germany) advised me to give vitamin d (500i.e.) during the winter months. do you agree? also, what about multi vitamins? my dc eat a varied diet, so I think no need for that, but some people say that it is impossible to get everything out of a normal diet.

MillyMollyMardy Mon 07-Feb-11 16:06:21

Please could you answer ietstartstmoz's question as we have a similar problem; 3.5 son who poos at least 4 times a day. He had reflux and has a degree of CMP intolerance. He eats a balanced diet with little processed sugar (I'm a dentist)but at least 2 portions of fruit a day more if I would let him. He is toilet trained but the pooing is incredible so any dietary advice would be welcomed.
Thank you.

Pinky14 Mon 07-Feb-11 19:35:18

Is it possible to over feed a one year old and if not what age can they start to eat more than they need?

I work a lot with serious athletes who train between 8 - 12 sessions per week (1-2 hrs in length) for a power/endurance sport where competitive races generally last between 6-8 mins in length. Since I was a competing athlete there seems to have been a shift in dietary thinking away from loads of carbs towards a more protein based diet. I wondered what your thoughts were in the carbs vs protein debate for elite athletes and what ratio you would recommend for carbs/protein/fat for male and female athletes (if different) in their overall diet.

Thanks

skewiff Mon 07-Feb-11 21:40:08

Hello Jane,

My son has cerebral palsy hemiplegia. It is mild and he is doing very well. He is 4 years old. I often wonder if I could improve his life/ ie awaken never discovered nerves, reduce spasticity and/ or increase energy levels through giving him iron, extra vitamins or something else.

I do realise that perhaps I should get him tested for deficiencies, but don't want to spend lots of money on something I know little about.

Thank you.

VenetiaLanyon Tue 08-Feb-11 09:25:24

Sorry, another question....is there any official guidance on portion sizes / sizes of 5 a day etc for children at all the different ages?

crazymum53 Tue 08-Feb-11 10:17:36

Hi there.

I have high blood pressure and so add no salt when cooking vegetables etc.
However my partner complains that this makes the food lack taste and adds salt to his food all the time (as far as I know his blood pressure is OK). Now my daughter is trying to copy him and I am not sure if this is healthy or not (she is 11). Please advise.

newshoesonmonday Tue 08-Feb-11 10:33:38

Dear Jane

Have you any dietary advice which might reduce occurrence of cysts? I seem prone to skin cysts where a blocked pore simply gets out of control and I end up with a longstaying cyst. They are very uncomfortable and obviously unsightly if on skin not covered up. I think I must be very disposed to this, as I actually had one excised and I'm due to go back to consultant as it's recurring. Is there anything I can eat which has 'anti cyst' properties? thanks so much

solo Tue 08-Feb-11 10:48:11

Hello Jane.
My 4 year old goes through stages of not eating meat and vegetables, but will live on pasta 3 meals a day if I let her. I'm a bit concerned about this as it strikes me that she's just not getting enough good food. As an example, last night I made a pasta dish with just tinned tuna in spring water and sweetcorn with a sprinkling of cheese over and she ate all except the tuna so I'm at a loss. All my family are big foodies and not at all fussy, so it frustrates me greatly to see her picking her way through meals and often just not eating them.
She'll quite happily eat junk food such as tinned spaghetti or oven chips, whereas no one else really likes that type of food.
I will add though, that she is a fruitbat!
Can you reassure me please or give me some ideas on things to try?
Thank you!

mummiehunnie Tue 08-Feb-11 11:36:33

Jane,

I wonder if you could help me please.

Several times it has showed up in blood tests that I have a vitamin D and B6 deficency, the gp has not got an answer to why this is, although I have an underlying genetic connective condition which I wonder could be the cause.

I am quite good with eating veg (various in season fruits) and whole grain food. I have avacado about once a month to top up B6 as I don't like liver which was what the gp recomended. I do eat too much junk on top of regular food though. I drink water, tea, coffee, diet coke and about two units of alcohol at the weekend (g and T) and don't smoke. I do go out in the sun. I have no idea why this keeps happening, and I wondered if you know what could be the problem or how I could make it better?

many thanks

dinkydalton Tue 08-Feb-11 11:36:49

Hi Jane. My nails are very flaky and brittle. In days of old I used to eat a jelly cube but I have been a vegetarian for 20 years so for obvious reasons don't want to consume Gelatine. Could you suggest any other foods or supplements which might help? Thanks

angelcake99 Tue 08-Feb-11 11:46:39

Hi Jane.

I am quite a few stone overweight and have PCOS. I have been prescribed slow release Metformin for this.
I am vegetarian and have struggled to control my cravings for sweet foods and high carbs, please could you advise what foods could help with my weight and help me feel satisfied for longer? Many Thanks

JaneClarke Tue 08-Feb-11 12:06:15

Testing

LaraJade Tue 08-Feb-11 12:20:49

Hi jane - please can u advise me?
I'm a 34 yr old nurse + work full time shifts.
Am 2st overweight - i want to have energy to go to gym to do cardio + weights.
THE PROBLEM: due to epilepsy i take 2g Epilim Chrono - it works but the side effect is increased appetite. If i don't eat every 4 hours max i feel v faint - not good at work! Also i take 225mg Venlafaxine (anti depressant). These meds, my lifestyle and my chronic depression make me v tired, so i don't have time or motivation to cook.
How can i diet without getting too hungry?
Also due to the Epilim my hair is fine + v brittle which is horrid.

Any ideas would be appreciated. Thanks

Jammygal Tue 08-Feb-11 12:26:24

Jane I know quite a few of us on here have hypothyroidism. (I have anaemia too) any tips on diet that may help us to get our metabolism back on track. I know lots of us feel the same way, tired , fat and old before our time ;)

GeraldineMumsnet (MNHQ) Tue 08-Feb-11 12:31:29

Hello all, thanks for all your questions.

Jane is here at MNHQ (welcome Jane!), so without further ado, over to you...

silverfrog Tue 08-Feb-11 12:31:43

Hello Jane,

what would you recommned by way of calcium intake for a child who is dairy and gluten intolerant (which knocks out a large section of supplements), as well as unable to have any additives (colours/flavours/preservatives) whether natural or not (which knocks out the remaining few supplements...)

said child also has a restricted diet (due to ASD), so the standard "leafy green vegetables" do not go down too well...

ImFab Tue 08-Feb-11 12:37:12

Jane, feel free to ignore my question if you want as I have now been diagnosed with gastritis.

JaneClarke Tue 08-Feb-11 12:37:21

hello everyone. it's great to be here-having left my eight year old daughter at school this morning, it's lovely to have a mum's moment before I go off to see my patients. Thanks for all of you who have already sent in questions-I hope my typing is fast enough to be able to get through them all. I would just like to point out that my responses should be taken as a general point rather than any specific advice for any health complaint, as this ensures that your health is protected. If you're at all worried, feel free to contact me via mumsnet or come and see me in my practice.
so here goes...

JaneClarke Tue 08-Feb-11 12:38:52

angelcake99

Hi Jane.

I am quite a few stone overweight and have PCOS. I have been prescribed slow release Metformin for this.
I am vegetarian and have struggled to control my cravings for sweet foods and high carbs, please could you advise what foods could help with my weight and help me feel satisfied for longer? Many Thanks

PCOS is a tough condition manage, as the body can be cruel making you crave the foods which unfortunately not only don't make you feel great, but actually because of their effect on blood sugar and insulin levels make the symptoms of PCOS worse. Generally with PCOS the thing we try to achieve is a steady blood sugar level as this helps to keep the hormone insulin levels steady too.
as a vegetarian lentils and beans are great satisfying foods, which contain a combination of carb and protein, which can help you feel satiated but not too heavy-so delicious dishes like lentil soup, full of vegetables can be a wonderful lunch, or little chickpea rissoles go well with a big green leafy salad for a comforting supper. You may also like to try using more nuts and seeds as these say toasted on top of a salad or steamed curly Kale with a dollop of hummus can help make it all taste great and above all keep you satisfied for longer, ultimately helping you to control your weight. Finally, there is a traditional remedy for helping ease sugar cravings which seems to work well with a lot of my patients with PCOS, and that is to sniff something vanilla based, such as vanilla essence or a perfume based around vanilla, as vanilla really helps to kick sweet cravings-strange but it seems to work!

ItsGraceAgain Tue 08-Feb-11 12:44:24

Hi, Jane.
I've got CFS/ME and want to get better.

I eat a lot of meat, fruit & veg, and I take a multivitamin + mineral supplement plus Omega3 and Vitamin C. Do you know of anything else (affordable) that could help support my poor, tired system?

Thanks.

strawberrycake Tue 08-Feb-11 12:48:38

Hi Jane,

I've posted on here a lot about my 8 month old son's feeding issues. He's reluctant to eat, screaming or gagging to avoid it. He's particularly bad with liquids/ bottles. I've tried changing temperatures and textures finger/ spoons etc. but I'm at a loss with him. After a stomach bug he's refused to eat for 8 days and lost nearly 1.5lb (9th to below 2nd centile for weight, and he's a long baby). He's always gained poorly and fed poorly, he started above the 75th centile for weight. He's allergic to dairy/ soya too. I'm not sure what to do for next steps with him. He's picked up on eating a bit as of last night but it's still a long way from normal. He can go days on just water and a few rice cakes, a good day thought is around 8-10oz of milk and two small meals. HE's encouraged a lot gently and sits with us for meals.

Thanks.

JaneClarke Tue 08-Feb-11 12:50:14

Jammygal

Jane I know quite a few of us on here have hypothyroidism. (I have anaemia too) any tips on diet that may help us to get our metabolism back on track. I know lots of us feel the same way, tired , fat and old before our time ;)

what a combination-as you say being deficient in thyroxine and anaemic is bound to make you feel exhausted. I just wonder what you're doing to correct your anaemia as although it takes a few weeks for iron deficiency( which is the most common form and therefore I'm assuming it is the type your referring to of) anaemia to correct, if you can get your iron levels up in your diet, along with your vitamin C intake up, you should soon start to feel much stronger. the iron rich foods are really the meat based, so this means lean steak, eggs, dark green leafy vegetables such as spinach, curly Kale and soya-which could be soya milk or the soya proteins. if you can boost the amount of these in your diet, then slowly but surely your anaemia should correct itself. I mentioned vitamin C, as this vitamin helps your body to absorb the iron-so this could practically mean simply squeezing some fresh lemon onto a spinach salad or using a little finely grated orange rind in a vinaigrette dressing made with a walnut oil before you toss it into a rocket salad to serve with some thinly sliced roast beef.
I tend to prefer the herbal iron supplements such as Gentle Iron, and floradix rather than the harder prescribed supplements, as these tend to be gentler on the gut.
On the thyroid side, you may have read that some people find that having a diet rich in iodine can help improve symptoms, which would mean eating more seaweed and seafood, but i would just caution against taking iodine supplements unless you've had specific advice from a clinical dietitian, as they can have adverse effects on your thyroid gland, so it's just worth a little caution.

Aitch Tue 08-Feb-11 12:50:59

can i have two questions, please? (greed a perennial prob).

1. What are your thoughts re weaning babies? (disclosure: BLWer here but faaaar from hardcore).

2. DH, the poor lamb, has just been diagnosed with psoriasis, it literally appeared a fortnight ago and he is in misery. what can we do nutritionally to help him?

oh and i think you are tremendously pretty with sparkly eyes. grin hope your dd is well, she is also gorgeous.

JaneClarke Tue 08-Feb-11 12:57:35

FunnysInTheGarden

Hi Jane. Always loved your no nonsense approach to food. So how come they replaced you with that idiot John Briffa at The Observer? I followed your columns avidly, but hate The Biffa's rather holier than thou take on 'What's In Your Basket' I mean, will nothing please the man? 'Ooooh porridge........you do know that it will raise your blood sugar and then cause it to crash with hideous consequences don't you' In the common parlance of MN FFS.

So Jane, when are you coming back? We need you!

Oh I do miss the Observer-I LOVED writing for them!It does feel a long time ago though, I was childless and lived in a minimal factory which would no way look the same now that I have gorgeous 8 year old Maya!!
I made the decision 2 years ago when I moved out of London to step away from writing a twice weekly column as i just didn't want the pressure( having been a columnist for 10 years) and also wanted to treasure my time with Maya, as it's going sooo quickly. But I hope you enjoy my articles as I feel inspired to write them and my new book, as I have to say having the flexibility to write Nourish without the pressures of a newspaper editor breathing down my neck was lovely.

Aitch Tue 08-Feb-11 12:59:32

oh yes you were great in the nobserver, briffa was one of reasons i stopped getting it. (and that cocktail girl annoyance)

littlehayleyc Tue 08-Feb-11 13:06:20

Hi Jane,

I just wondered whether you could give me an idea of how much my 3 and half year old should be eating? We did baby led weaning, and he used to eat anything but now is very fussy and often goes to bed without a proper dinner. He tends to want the same old things like beans, spaghetti, sausages and fish fingers, and rarely tries anything new. He also doesn't like any sauces or things mixed in. Eg he'll eat rice and peas separately but not mixed together ?! Is it a normal phase?

Jammygal Tue 08-Feb-11 13:07:28

Jane ty for reply regarding iron......it doesn't matter what I do I just can't increase my levels....but will give your tips a go.
My 5 yo son has a nut, seed, egg and penicillin allergy . Do you have any tips for him?

fullmoonfiend Tue 08-Feb-11 13:09:57

Oh I have come late to the party and you have a zillion questions to answer - Can you come back again some time and do Q and A?

CuppaTeaJanice Tue 08-Feb-11 13:13:22

Hi Jane,

Do you think Gillian McKeith's pitiful performance on 'I'm a Celebrity' has had a detrimental effect to the reputation of the nutritionist/dietitian practice? ie. Is the public more likely to now think that good nutrition is of little benefit if one of it's more famous champions is looking old and haggard and fainting all over the place?

JaneClarke Tue 08-Feb-11 13:15:14

philmassive

Hi Jane, my ds is 7 and will only eat an extremely limited selection of foods - sausages, pasta, olives, orange juice, steak, chicken, ketchup, bread, tuna, cheese and tomato pizza, and rubbish like crisps and sweets. He doesn't eat any fruit or vegetables in their proper form and he steadfastly refuses to try new things and even sometimes refuses familiar things if they look different or have a different texture.
I do try to buy the best versions of what he will eat like high meat content sausages and organic ketchup but I know he must be enormously lacking nutritionally and I think he must often be hungry and bored by such a limited diet. He won't eat versions of the foods he does like ie he eats pasta and tuna but won't have tuna and pasta bake. He hates 'wet' food.
Do you have any tips to encourage him to try new foods and would you recommend a vitamin supplement for him? Also from reading on here other people's experiences I do wonder if he has some sort of disorder. Can you explain how I could go about finding out if this is the case?
Thanks

I wouldn't panic and don't think that he has a disorder, as frustrating as it is, I think it's just one of those phases he will grow out of. It may well take going around to a friend's house where he's served tuna and pasta bake and nothing else is on offer, for him to click out of being so specific over what he will and won't eat. I know it may feel as if he's lacking in essential nutrients, but the test of this is really if he is thriving, feeling well, enjoying activities, etc, as the body will tend to grab more of an essential nutrient, rather bizarrely if you don't have that much of it-this can be the case with minerals like calcium, which if you don't have that much in the diet, their intestine absorbs a high proportion of what it's offered. so unless he is flagging, then I would assume that he at the moment is getting enough to keep him healthy. It's a tough line to tow but I have to say having treated lots of children who are fussy eaters, the more clear you can be about just offering that one food and not then offering something else if he doesn't eat it, the more likely he is to finally, albeit after some tantrums I'm sure and some pretty miserable meals, realise that he needs to tuck in.
incentive charts also work well, even at 7, so he can work his way towards something he'll love, if he tries a few mouthfuls etc. finally, I know it's not easy but try as much as you can to eat the same food as him and with him, as this can help build up his desire to please you.
I'm going to sneak in a mention about sugar if you don't mind here, as I see lots of you have written in worried about the amount of sugar you're giving your children. Sugar is a very divisive and judgmental issue as some of us much prefer not to give many sweet things, such as sweet drinks and biscuits, whereas other parents think we're being overly strict and risking a backlash. I so often see that overly sweet foods, such as refined sweets and drinks don't make children feel great, so my feeling is why would I want to give a child something that does this? Every parent has a right to choose what they give their child and yet other parents can be so overly critical if you don't go along with what they do. the only caution I would offer is being too strict when they're at friends parties or houses and everyone else is eating the sweet stuff you'd rather your child wouldn't eat-try to let them have some as they'll rebel if you don't and you also run the risk of them then starting to feel they need to hide the food from you, which is a path best avoided if you can. Limit as much as you can and just see it as a blip as you'll know they'll soon be back on the nourishing stuff at home.

JaneClarke Tue 08-Feb-11 13:22:03

Rindercella

Hi Jane

Unfortunately I won't be online when you are on this webchat but I would really appreciate your advice.

My DH has advanced prostate cancer (spread to lymph nodes & widespread bone metastases). He has been to the Penny Brohn clinc and we are trying to follow the Bristol Diet to help him as much as we can. Unfortuantely he sometimes struggles to eat due to his illness and treatment. I cook everything from scratch for him, with lots of lentils, vegetables, (little) fish and occasional chicken. He has totally cut out diary from his diet and has now started to eat gluten free bread.

What other advice would you give? In your experience is this diet helpful? If so, how can it help? Is there anything else I could be doing to help him? He sometimes (actually, frequently) finds food very difficult to digest. Do you have any advice on how better this could be managed?

I know my husband's cancer will not be cured, but what can help to make him more comfortable and his life more bearable?

MNHQ, I understand that I have asked more than one question, but I'm desperate.

I'm so sorry to hear about your husband. I work a lot with patients with cancer, be this prostate cancer or cancers of all sorts, in my practice in central London, so if you would like to come and see me, I would be delighted to help you put together a strategy to help ease some of your husbands symptoms.
Food can be a wonderful way to ease a lot of the symptoms of cancer but I have to say that there is so much scare mongering around the links between dairy and cancers, when recent studies show that cancer rich foods such as yoghurt and milk can actually have a cancer protecting effect. i don't mention this to confuse you, just to highlight that it's such a complex area which I would love to be able to support you more through. as a starting point there is a chapter in my new book Nourish on cancer, so this may give you a few ideas and pointers.

philmassive Tue 08-Feb-11 13:24:48

Thanks Jane, will try the incentive idea.

May also hatch a plot with ds's friend's Mum to give him an unusual tea!

Thanks for the reply.

JaneClarke Tue 08-Feb-11 13:26:54

Aonach

I just wanted to say that as a Dietitian I so pleased that Mumsnet are using a credible person and not a 'nutritionist' . Like Trilian I wish you had put it in the title thought.

Nutritionists are entirely unregulated where dietitians have studied between 4 and 6 years at uni with clinical placements and are HPC regulated to only provide evidence based advice.

Well done mumsnet and Jane for raising the profile of Dietitians.

Whilst I love being a Dietitian, the problem with the word is that it still to many creates an image of a holier than thou white coated professional who hands out diet sheets. I know we're not, but the reason I often refer to myself as a Nutritionist is that it helps people to feel that I'm all about Nourishment and Nutrients, the foods you can eat, rather than putting people on diets. As you say though, there are so many nutritionists out there who have no qualifications and many people are thinking that they're professionally qualified. I therefore like to use Nutritionist and Dietitian, but realise that it's a bit of a mouthful!

DolceeBanana Tue 08-Feb-11 13:32:58

Hi Jane

I have 3 children (4.5, 3.5 and 16 months)...The eldest, my son has always been far pickier than his sisters. He hates fish and will pften gag when encouraged to taste it. We eat a fairly healthy, balanced diet of home cooked food. How would you coax him to eat anf enjoy fish?

Many thanks

JaneClarke Tue 08-Feb-11 13:35:01

Hi Jane,

I have had several miscarriages over the last year (diagnosed with over-active natural killer cells, sub-clinical hypothyroid and Factor V Leiden), and the only time that I successfully carried a pregnancy I was on a very low carb diet.

Even when not low-carbing I generally eat a healthy diet, with very few sugary foods or ready meals.

I wanted to ask whether you believe that there such thing as an optimal fertility diet?

Thanks smile[/quote]

The relationship between specific foods and fertility is a little complex, so I'm sorry if I don't get to cover this completely today. It's interesting that you have found that a low carb diet has been successful, as i suspect that it may have something to do with the relationship which exists between insulin and the other reproductive hormones. eating a low carb diet can help some women but i would say that one thing worth checking is that your diet is as all round nourishing as possible, rich in good quality lean proteins and vegetables and fruits as you're more likely to ensure that you have plentiful amounts of beneficial nutrients such as zinc and vitamin C. there is a chapter in my book-this is not meant to be a plug, but there is so much more to say and I've run out of time. do feel free to come and see me though in my practice if you'd like to.

angelcake99 Tue 08-Feb-11 13:40:13

Thanks for your advice Jane.

I will give it all a go. What a good excuse for a new perfume too! smile

JaneClarke Tue 08-Feb-11 13:41:01

ItsGraceAgain

Hi, Jane.
I've got CFS/ME and want to get better.

I eat a lot of meat, fruit & veg, and I take a multivitamin + mineral supplement plus Omega3 and Vitamin C. Do you know of anything else (affordable) that could help support my poor, tired system?

Thanks.

Grace, I'm sorry to hear about ME as I know from having treated so many people with ME how debilitating it can be. Try as much as you can to have three protein rich meals a day as you'll probably find that this helps maintain a good blood sugar control, which can maintain better energy levels-this could be an omelette, scrambled eggs, a quick tuna fish salad or some cold cut deli hams or smoked salmon, made as an open sandwich on a slice of wholemeal bread.

GeraldineMumsnet (MNHQ) Tue 08-Feb-11 13:42:02

Sadly, Jane's out of time but we're talking to her about doing a Q&A or an evening webchat, so she can get through some more of your questions. We'll post when we've got details.

Thanks v much to Jane. And to everyone who took part.

ThePosieParker Tue 08-Feb-11 13:42:13

Hi there, I've had eating issues since I was in my teens, losing weight by not eating but because my appetite disappears, then ballooning from under 6st to over 12st in pregnancy. What foods can I eat that will inspire me to eat well? [miracle question]

JaneClarke Tue 08-Feb-11 13:42:16

sorry everyone for having to rush off, but I really look forward to being here again.

ThePosieParker Tue 08-Feb-11 13:42:42

Bugger..........sad

ItsGraceAgain Tue 08-Feb-11 13:52:54

Just want to post my thanks to Jane Glad I squeezed in there!

I was aware that protein is vv important for managing energy levels in CFS/ME, but hadn't thought to start the day with it [dumb emoticon]

Bacon & eggs from now on grin

VenetiaLanyon Tue 08-Feb-11 14:51:25

Thanks very much Jane

Rindercella Tue 08-Feb-11 15:11:25

Jane, thank you very much for taking the time to respond to my questions.

jonicomelately Tue 08-Feb-11 16:26:57

Why did she post so few answers?

Mine was the first one confused

RachelMumsnet (MNHQ) Tue 08-Feb-11 16:39:03

Jane had to rush off this afternoon to an appointment at her clinic and she was disappointed not to get through more of your questions. As she said, she didn't want to rush the answers because the questions are quite specific and involved. However, she would love the opportunity to answer more of your questions and we'll keep you posted on this. In the meantime, you can find out more about Jane at her website Jane Clarke and her book Nourish is available now.

jonicomelately Tue 08-Feb-11 17:45:37

OK. Thanks.

IngridBergmann Tue 08-Feb-11 19:23:07

<blinks>

<misses it>

Some nice answers, it's a shame it wasn't longer, these things need to be accurate and thought through don't they though.

Glad she answered Rinders but it looks like Rinders will need to go and buy a book sad

anyway...a good start, if she's coming back!

jonicomelately Tue 08-Feb-11 19:29:39

I'm glad she answered Rinders as well smile

FunnysInTheGarden Tue 08-Feb-11 22:23:03

Oh, Thanks Jane for answering my question. I totally understand though that you need to put you daughter first. Will look out your books and continue to sneer at John Briffa in the meantime..................

crissyboo Tue 08-Feb-11 22:59:05

Hi Jane

I have an underactive thyroid and currently take 150mg thyroxine a day, however I am constantly tired and am gaining weight despite going to the gym 3 times a week and trying to follow weight watchers. Are there any foods I can eat or supplements I could take to boost my thyroid level??? It is really starting to get me down now I also have psorisis and depression.

goldenticket Tue 08-Feb-11 23:12:33

Oh shame sad - really hope she can come back and answer a few more.

RachelMumsnet (MNHQ) Mon 14-Feb-11 15:05:28

Really pleased to tell you that Jane has agreed to come back tomorrow evening between 7.30 and 8.30 to tackle some of the questions posted up here that she didn't get time to answer last week.

goldenticket Mon 14-Feb-11 16:26:45

Brilliant, thank you Jane!

SameAsYou Tue 15-Feb-11 13:00:00

Thats fantastic would really love it if my question was answered!

AtYourCervix Tue 15-Feb-11 15:45:49

Dear Jane - So glad you are coming back.

I am despairing over DDs diet (see my original Q on P1). She just eats crap. We all eat normally, proper meals, vegetables, fruit etc. She doesn't.

JaneClarke Tue 15-Feb-11 19:34:58

Hi everyone, sorry for being a few minutes late but the traffic was horrendous, but I'm here now and ready to start chatting and working through your questions.
one thing just to remind you about is the fact that my answers should be taken as a general why don't you try this type of help, rather than a specific therapeutic comment. If you're at all worried about anything then feel free to come and see me in my practice.

JaneClarke Tue 15-Feb-11 19:44:56

ByThePowerOfGreyskull

Hi Jane,
I have a seemingly healthy diet, fruit or veg at every meal, I don't cut out any food groups and try to have a balance of thirds on my plate.

However, I am a very windy person blush (both ends) and I get huge cramps from time always in the same place - just slightly in from my right hip bone.

I haven't yet managed to work out what it could be.. any tips?

wind is always an awkward subject to bring up, but it's oh so common, so I'm glad you have..
so a few things to try-have you first of all thought about keeping a food and symptom diary for a few days as this could show you if there is any specific food or food type, such as brassicas like cabbage, artichokes, sprouts etc which could be making things worse or just not suiting you. it's a good place to start as it gives you some pointers hopefully. It's my experience from treating this problem for many people that it's often down to a combination of sometimes having too much raw foods-try a week of eating cooked vegetables and fruits instead of raw and see if this makes a difference. equally you may find that a couple of remedies could help-my favourites are aloe vera juice, which as disgusting as it is to drink, it can soothe a windy gut and also try taking a pre and probiotic supplement containing about 4 billion cultures of probiotics, for a few weeks to see if rebalancing the gut bacteria helps too. good luck!

MerryMarigold Tue 15-Feb-11 19:51:43

Hi Jane

This is a very basic question. Whicj foods are really good at promoting energy and which foods drain your energy levels (yes, yes, biscuits!).

Also, are there recipes in your Nourish book?

JaneClarke Tue 15-Feb-11 19:52:24

SameAsYou

Hi Jane

I have Psoriasis and advised to reduce dairy. I don't really have that much dairy other than tea or coffee.

Please can you advise what other foods would be good to eat. Or any supplements.

Thanks You

I'm not really sure why you've been advised to cut down on dairy as although too much of anything doesn't do the body any good, I'd be surprised if dairy foods were aggravating your psoriasis. It's a tough skin condition to treat as everyone is slightly different and it doesn't seem to respond in as general way as say eczema, but one thing I'd try is to boost your intake of the long chain omega 3 fatty acids, as these can have an anti inflammatory effect on the skin, which if taken at a level of a couple of portions( a portion we usually define as 140g ish) of salmon, fresh tuna, sardines, mackerel a week this could give your body a good dose of these beneficial omegas. One thing to point out as a more general point for anyone online tonight is that women of child bearing age shouldn't be eating more than a couple of portions of these oily fish a week, as we have concerns over the toxins in oily fish, which could potentially be passed onto an unborn child. this isn't meant to scare anyone, but it's best and perfectly safe and nourishing to have a couple of portions in a week, but don't OD on them. Men and older women can have up to 4 portions a week.
but back to your psoriasis, also see if there are any foods or drinks which are aggravating it, as certain wines can, as can histamine rich foods such as strawberries.
I talk about how to deal with skin conditions in my new book, so you may just find that useful.

1234ThumbWar Tue 15-Feb-11 19:57:48

Jane I know what I should be eating and what I shouldn't, but can't seem to stop eating rubbish. Do you have any advice on how to get control over food?

JaneClarke Tue 15-Feb-11 19:58:47

CuppaTeaJanice

Hi Jane,

Do you think Gillian McKeith's pitiful performance on 'I'm a Celebrity' has had a detrimental effect to the reputation of the nutritionist/dietitian practice? ie. Is the public more likely to now think that good nutrition is of little benefit if one of it's more famous champions is looking old and haggard and fainting all over the place?

Oh how could I resist this question!!
It's such a shame that people assume that Gillian is a Dietitian and lump us all in the same sack and judge us as such. As so many of you have quite rightly pointed out, there is a HUGE difference between someone who calls themself a nutritionist and a properly qualified dietitian-whilst there are some great accredited nutritionists, at the moment it's hard to tell the difference. if you see someone who calls themself a Dietitian, you know that they have to have completed a degree or post graduate Dietetic qualification so I think it's a much safer place to ask for professional advice.

MerryMarigold Tue 15-Feb-11 19:59:20

Ooh, like that qu thumbwar. Jane had a good tip about sniffing vanilla stopping sweet cravings. I shall be keeping a bottle out from now on!

notgotanyanswers1 Tue 15-Feb-11 20:09:00

i have fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome, any suggestions what i should be eating, as my appetite isn't brilliant except when it comes to sweet things, i'm a couple of stone overweight and i try to eat sensibly,but i do find it difficult

JaneClarke Tue 15-Feb-11 20:09:58

GreatGooglyMoogly

Could the reason I am often tired and need naps be that my diet is lacking in something, or even that I don't drink enough water? I have had blood tests and am neither anaemic nor diabetic. Many Thanks.

A couple of things to try-firstly it could be that you're not drinking enough water as it's amazing once you hit the 2.5L a day mark that energy levels can just feel more consistent. I know it sounds a lot but if you stagger it throughout the day, this can help you firstly not end up on the loo all the time and secondly keep energy levels and moods up.
it could be 2.5L water or a herbal tea-the ones I find most energising are lemon, be this fresh lemon in boiling water, or with mint leaves, or a tea such as lemon verbena or lemon and ginger, or fresh root ginger in hot water-try them..
secondly why don't you see if boosting your protein intake makes a difference, as I tend to find that if my lunch is high in lean proteins, such as some roast chicken, or if I'm home and make an omelette or something like some cold wafer thin ham and basically have a pretty heavy protein hit( along with the salads, veggies etc), I feel more energised in the afternoon, as opposed to having more of a bread based lunch which if there is just too much bread, it makes us snooze. the other option is to try crisp breads-I rather like the Dr Karg style biscuits with seeds on or the Swedish style rye crackers, as they're delicious and don't tend to make our energy levels drop as much as a big bready sandwich. I see so many people who find that too much of the starch at lunch time doesn't work. I'm not saying you need to avoid the starches all together, but just try tweaking the amount.

JaneClarke Tue 15-Feb-11 20:16:25

ThePosieParker

Hi there, I've had eating issues since I was in my teens, losing weight by not eating but because my appetite disappears, then ballooning from under 6st to over 12st in pregnancy. What foods can I eat that will inspire me to eat well? [miracle question]

I wish I could wave a magic wand for you!
have you tried to see someone professionally as I'm presuming going down to 6st was far too light for you. You don't say how much you weigh now, but I'm assuming that you're not happy where it is...
do see if you can come and see me in my practice as i'd love to be able to help. but if you can't I have a section on eating issues in my book-look in the teenage section, which I know isn't age wise where you are, but I think it could help...
one thing to try straight away would be to try and get into a habit of sticking to three meals a day-I know this sounds so general and boring, but forcing yourself to get into a structured eating pattern rather than picking or snacking, or going for long periods without eating and then overeating, will really help you start to move forward. and ask yourself is the food which I'm about to put in my mouth going to nourish me, if it is then go ahead, but if not, ditch it!

JaneClarke Tue 15-Feb-11 20:20:39

crissyboo

Hi Jane

I have an underactive thyroid and currently take 150mg thyroxine a day, however I am constantly tired and am gaining weight despite going to the gym 3 times a week and trying to follow weight watchers. Are there any foods I can eat or supplements I could take to boost my thyroid level??? It is really starting to get me down now I also have psorisis and depression.

have you had your thyroid gland checked recently, as I just wonder what's going on? also I'd ask for your doctor to refer you to an endocrinologist which is a hormone doctor as they can check to see if there is anything else wrong hormone wise which could do with tweaking, as you shouldn't be gaining as much weight etc and feeling so low. The problem with supplements supposedly designed to boost your thyroid function is that either they just don't work or worse still they can interfere with the thyroxine's effectiveness and get you into all sorts of messes-I'd really press your doctor to get you to see an endocrinologist-insist!

JaneClarke Tue 15-Feb-11 20:27:32

MerryMarigold

Hi Jane

This is a very basic question. Whicj foods are really good at promoting energy and which foods drain your energy levels (yes, yes, biscuits!).

Also, are there recipes in your Nourish book?

Ah, a biscuit lover!
yes they can give you a boost and be utterly delicious as they do, but so often we feel a crash afterwards.. so in the long run you don't feel great. the trick can lie in trying two things-try a sweet treat which is based around something with wholegrain and fruit, such as slice of walnut and fig cake, made with wholemeal flour and apple puree, as this tends to be more gentle on blood sugar and hence energy levels. secondly, try if you're wanting to have something sweet, to eat it after a meal which has some protein in it, such as some meat, fish, eggs etc, or if you're vegetarian lentil or bean based such as bowel of Tuscan bean soup, as this helps to slow down the absorption of the sugar, which again just helps cushion any sugar related energy surges and crashes.
there are lots of recipes in Nourish, so i hope you enjoy them!

MerryMarigold Tue 15-Feb-11 20:30:25

Thanks so much for that, Jane. It's really helpful. I will also start drinking more water/ herbal teas as I'm afraid I'm a coffee drinker blush.

JaneClarke Tue 15-Feb-11 20:32:52

DolceeBanana

Hi Jane

I have 3 children (4.5, 3.5 and 16 months)...The eldest, my son has always been far pickier than his sisters. He hates fish and will pften gag when encouraged to taste it. We eat a fairly healthy, balanced diet of home cooked food. How would you coax him to eat anf enjoy fish?

Many thanks

I'd take the pressure off yourself if he's otherwise eating well, as children don't always genuinely like the foods we wish they would eat at certain points in their lives, but the likelihood is that he will click into another phase and especially if he sees his sisters eating fish, to join in too. have you tried fish soup which is blended as then he won't know it's there? at the age of 4.5 he's perfect age for incentive chart, so try to pick something he'll love and break this achievement into several stars, so that slowly but surely he can see there is something good to come out of at least trying and hopefully enjoying eating fish. could always try the thing I used to love as a child when we went on holiday to North Wales and to take fish and chips onto the sea wall and to watch the waves whilst we ate them!

JaneClarke Tue 15-Feb-11 20:34:04

I'm sorry that the time has flown by too quickly again, but a huge thanks for all your questions. I'll be back again.
warmest wishes
Jane

RachelMumsnet (MNHQ) Tue 15-Feb-11 20:38:33

Huge thanks Jane for joining us again tonight. We'll be in touch again to invite you back to join us later in the year.

goldenticket Tue 15-Feb-11 22:05:02

I must ask really dull questions! grin

GreatGooglyMoogly Wed 16-Feb-11 07:21:35

Thank you very much for answering my question Jane - I will give the drinking and lunch protein a go .

Giesslerpowers Sun 20-Feb-11 18:31:36

I have your book Nourish and I think it looks lovely. Congratulations.

I am wondering what your thoughts are about 'Maya's chocolate brownies' in the book as a recipe for healthy eating though. We are all advised to keep an eye on the amount of saturated fats in our diets (less than 1.5g is considered to be low and over 5g is considered to be high). The chocolate brownies are a whopping 15g of saturated fat per 100g.
Each brownie (if 10 are made from the quantity of mix) is over 500calories and has nearly 19g saturated fats. I believe the average women is recommended to have no more than 20g saturated fat per day so this one brownie gives virtually 100% of requirements (and that is without the addition of ice cream as you recommend). We can all have an indulgence once in a while of course but how does this brownie differ from other brownies that are not so 'healthy'?

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