CSA for step child

(439 Posts)
helmaria Wed 22-Jan-14 20:45:37

Now my ex has a step child living with him, does this lessen my csa payments?

PatriciaHolm Wed 22-Jan-14 20:55:28

yes; his gross income for assessment will be reduced by 11% i believe.

Monetbyhimself Wed 22-Jan-14 20:55:29

Yes it will be taken into account.

helmaria Wed 22-Jan-14 21:03:43

So my children will get less because he is supporting a step daughter? Is this regardless to whether child maintence is being received for her? :-0

PatriciaHolm Wed 22-Jan-14 21:05:56

Yes, I'm afraid so. Her child maintenance arrangements are irrelevant.

IneedAwittierNickname Wed 22-Jan-14 21:08:30

Yep. Stupid bloody rule IMO

Monetbyhimself Wed 22-Jan-14 21:09:13

Yea. It's a shit situation. But I would hazard a guess that there are very few people who have to be forced to pay maintenance via the Csa who would offer to pay the difference to ensure that their own child doesn't suffer financially.

helmaria Wed 22-Jan-14 21:10:30

Ah, bugger. this isn't the answer I wanted. But, thank you guys for answering me x

Monetbyhimself Wed 22-Jan-14 21:13:06

Your best hope that the new partner is a decent human being who will encourage your Ex not to reduce payments.

helmaria Wed 22-Jan-14 21:22:39

...and pigs might fly lol

Serobin Wed 22-Jan-14 21:38:27

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Serobin Wed 22-Jan-14 21:39:59

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Tuckshop Wed 22-Jan-14 22:59:12

How are you worse off Seronin? Your household will have an extra adult's income surely? But whether or not you are worse off, that was your choice to move in together. From the ex's point of view her income has been affected by someone else's choices.

To reduce support to your own children because you are living with someone else's just doesn't sit right with me.

IneedAwittierNickname Wed 22-Jan-14 23:04:54

I agree with what tuckshop just posted.

Incidentally, I was talking to my mum about this recently. She said one of the things she loves about my step dad is the fact that he would never have even considered cutting cm to his dc when he moved in with us. And now that I'm a single parent, with a usless ex who doesn't pay cm, I respect him even more knowing he could have reduced it if he'd so wished!

Serobin Wed 22-Jan-14 23:12:50

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Serobin Wed 22-Jan-14 23:16:50

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Tuckshop Thu 23-Jan-14 08:28:29

I'm staggered at that! And the point isn't really about expecting people to stay single - or even like some who go on and add more children into the household, that they shouldn't do that - it's that its a choice people make that has an impact on another household.

And I know the argument of if as a "together" couple you'd adjust to more children, the difference is that you have an input into those discussions and some ownership of the solution. The RP whose income has been affected doesn't.

needaholidaynow Fri 24-Jan-14 19:21:45

I don't believe any step parent should be liable to pay towards their stepchildren in either side, especially if it's to the detriment of their own children. I would point blank refuse to pay less towards to my kids if I moved in with someone who has a kid I have no obligations towards. And I would point blank refuse to pay maintenance on my DP's behalf for DSD wo I also have no obligations towards.

purpleroses Fri 24-Jan-14 22:33:50

It'll get reduced because of having an extra child in his household. On the other hand if they claim tax credits they may be counted as your ex's income - which could pull it back up again.

IneedAsockamnesty Sat 25-Jan-14 22:59:19

My estranged husband tried this with his children,I was fuming he had no financial ties to my children no responsibility towards them and I thought it was a gross misuse to then use them to reduce his liability towards his own.

I wrote to the CSA and told them that he had no financial liability or expectation of lability towards my kids and did not contribute towards the household in any way.

They still reduced what he had to pay to their poor mother.

MeepMeepVrooooom Tue 28-Jan-14 13:46:40

Good for you Sock that is quite admirable.

IneedAsockamnesty Tue 28-Jan-14 14:49:47

Not so much meet, he was a money grabbing freeloading leach it was exactly the right thing to do.

MeepMeepVrooooom Tue 28-Jan-14 15:06:10

A lot of people in your position wouldn't have done the same though. It's refreshing to see that some people stick to their morals regardless. It's a trait lost on a lot of people.

IneedAsockamnesty Tue 28-Jan-14 15:15:36

Thank you

balia Tue 28-Jan-14 18:25:08

When anyone decides to have another child, the money available for any existing children is less; that applies to RP's or NRP's - in fact DC's of the RP (usually the mother) who decides to have another child are often worse off because of maternity leave etc as well as there simply being more mouths to feed. I don't see many RP's taking the NRP's feelings into consideration when the RP's choice to have another child impacts on the money available in the household for their previous child.

Having said all that, though, perhaps people should look at the figures first before getting all irate? My DD went to Uni this year so DH's maintenance for DSS went up as there now isn't a deduction for DD (despite DD still costing us an arm and a leg, mind you). It went up by a princely £2 a week.

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