If you're a UK national living in the EU.......

(45 Posts)
doradoo Sat 20-Feb-16 15:40:25

What are your thoughts on the 'Brexit'? Are you planning on taking any special action - are you worried about your future?

We live in Germany and have been considering DE citizenship - as we can have both at the moment - but am worried with today's announcement of referendum date that we may not have enough time to implement it.

What do you think it will mean for you and what do you plan to do?

Costacoffeeplease Sat 20-Feb-16 15:42:00

I don't know, and I don't plan to do anything really, I'm in Portugal, been here nearly 13 years

Gfplux Sat 20-Feb-16 16:19:44

Even if the vote is to leave there will be a two year period while negotiations take place over the leaving process.

lifeisunjust Sat 20-Feb-16 16:47:13

Any EU national living in another EU country for a period of 5 years gets "permanent residence" which they can only be stripped of for political on public policy reasons. If UK left the EU, those British citizens with the permanent residence of 5 years cannot be kicked out of that EU country.

Schwabischeweihnachtskanne Sat 20-Feb-16 18:29:34

It takes 10 days apparently doradoo once you have the have the Deutsche Test for Zuwanderer (which you might possibly be allowed to skip if you have any recognised certificates, esp if they are Goethe Institute ones, showing you are already at or above B1 - or you can take the test at a Goethe institute or through VHS) and the naturalisation test .

We phoned and checked a couple of weeks ago and were told its straight forward and the paperwork takes 10 days. As long as you've been here 8 years its pretty automatic and should be easily done before June even including taking the tests.

I'm probably going to do it, just got to get my arse in gear (not sure my grammar will be up to scratch but there are lots of practice tests on line, which I haven't yet got around to trying... intending to get around to doing something about it soonish grin )

gentlydownthestreammm Sat 20-Feb-16 22:37:19

Anyone know how we expats can register to vote in the referendum? News reports seem to suggest UK nationals who have lived overseas for less than 15 years will be able to vote, but no details on how...

clearsommespace Sun 21-Feb-16 06:14:10

Gently, I registered last year. You can be on the electoral roll of your last address in the UK so you have to contact the local council there. You can also register for postal voting.

dreame Sun 21-Feb-16 06:31:39

I've lived in the EU for five years, but two different countries. My kids have dual nationality, one of which is an EU one as DH is from the EU. We want to stay in our current country permanently, but I would have to give up my UK (and other - I have two) nationality to do so in a Brexit (current rules which I don't need to worry about as no Brexit yet). I don't want to give it up, so it looks like I'll have to try to become DHs nationality, which I didn't really want to do (need to be proficient in that language with no intention of really living there).

In short it's a total pain.

Rosa Sun 21-Feb-16 06:38:11

I just want answers that nobody can give right now ! I am going to try to register to vote but in the past they couldn't find me on the role and I got passed from pillar to post. I was paying into the UK system up to 11 years ago so I should be entitled to vote.
Does anyone have any useful links as what would happen to pensions etc?
In the meantime I am getting British passports for my DDs so they have the dual nationality.

EmilyAlice Sun 21-Feb-16 06:50:59

I think we got the original link from the British Embassy site, filled in that registration form then got forms from our former local council. Have just renewed for this year and it was very easy and all done on-line. We have been advised to get a postal proxy vote, so we have given our DD's name and UK address. She will get the form by post, vote on our behalf and post it back. Should save the problems we had last year with late arrival of the voting forms here in France.

EmilyAlice Sun 21-Feb-16 07:07:49

Info here
www.aboutmyvote.co.uk/register-to-vote/british-citizens-living-abroad

Laptopwieldingharpy Sun 21-Feb-16 07:15:48

There goes our dream of retiring in Barcelona after a long stint as expats in Asia confused

Schwabischeweihnachtskanne Sun 21-Feb-16 07:20:11

I must admit I can't fathom why people in the UK would think leaving the EU is a good idea...

Surely its only Daily Fail types who are spouting misunderstandings about closing boarders/ benefit scrounging forriners... UK businesses will surely really suffer if the UK leaves the EU, as well as the UK becoming more insignificant and having less of a voice in world politics, and the general minor inconvenience UK citizens will have when going on holidays etc.

allegretto Sun 21-Feb-16 07:22:14

I can't vote as I have been in Italy for longer than 15 years. I am applying for Italian citizenship but it's a long wait - possibly wouldn't even get it within 2 years. Can't believe it's 10 days in Germany!

lifeisunjust Sun 21-Feb-16 08:11:37

Any EU national living in another EU country who has the 5 year permanent residence would, on the UK quitting the EU, still be entitled to remain in that EU country, so I think some are worrying over nothing. It would only be those under 5 years who'd be at any risk.

Costacoffeeplease Sun 21-Feb-16 08:23:53

We're into our second residence card, valid for 10 years, expires in 2019, so I guess we're OK at least until then, and by then we'll have been here over 15 years - I wonder if it would stop new ex pats coming over?

Gfplux Sun 21-Feb-16 08:38:00

dorado, In Luxembourg you go to the commune and register. They then give you a residents permit. Have you such a thing.

allegretto Sun 21-Feb-16 08:43:33

It's not just about being entitled to remain though (I don't think I would be chucked out!). There are other advantages to being in the EU. In Italy, non-EU citizens usually need a visa to work, they don't necessarily have access to health care - I don't know what my status would be exactly.

VertigoNun Sun 21-Feb-16 08:44:57

I am so shocked at the lack of education in those claiming all out voters are of a type. There are many informative threads including university experts that show your theory to be very wrong.

Costacoffeeplease Sun 21-Feb-16 08:50:01

I think it would be difficult to introduce visas for all of us, all over Europe - it's more likely to affect people wanting to move from the uk to a different eu country

allegretto Sun 21-Feb-16 08:51:55

I think you're right but nobody is actually clear on what will happen. Plus, the government has already gone back on a promise made that Brits abroad can vote in the referendum so I don't really think they are interested in what we want.

Costacoffeeplease Sun 21-Feb-16 08:57:18

No, it's more a case of how our adopted countries/the eu react

AveEldon Sun 21-Feb-16 08:58:38

We have the opposite situation - we are in the UK but my OH is an EU national. We are doing nothing about it. He has been here long enough to get citizenship but there are disadvantages
He has an elderly parent overseas (non EU) and under current rules we can move the parent here with no costs. If OH becomes a UK citizen it is much harder.

doradoo Sun 21-Feb-16 09:01:45

Yes, we are registered in out city - everyone has to be. But we don't need a 'permit' as such as we are EU. We've been here 8 yrs so theoretically should be fine in terms of residence, but as a pp said - what about work and visas etc. AFAIK your company would usually have to prove why your job couldn't be done by an EU national..... So could impact. I suppose it would also depend on how petty other EU members are going to be about the UK leaving - and any other potential knock on effects. The unknown is the worst thing at the moment.

doradoo Sun 21-Feb-16 09:03:29

Oh - and just wondering too about those with property in the EU - my in-laws have a flat in France - will their status change / possible tax implications etc from that.

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