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UK tax returns

(11 Posts)
Nannyme1 Mon 05-Aug-13 19:07:57

I'm confused and don't understand!!!

I'm not from the UK but am working legally just outside of London. I got my NI number and registered as self employed which was how I was going to work but then things changed with the type of work I wanted to do so I decided to change jobs and was now employed. Which I have been paying taxes etc through a pay roll company.
In a letter or emaild (can't remember which) I was told HMRC would contact me if I needed to do anything further. They didn't. I've been home some time and have come back to the UK working again (employed) but I'm now quite worried that I should have done something else. I was under the impression that I only needed to file a tax return if I was wanting to claim expenses for work.. Is this the case?

I'm getting very worried as really don't understand any of the websites I'm on as they all contradict each other.

I'm worried that I will be fined??? Even though I have paid taxes??? I think it would be a largish fine as I entered the UK for the first time in 2011, I can't afford a large fine!

Really want to get this sorted out (if there is anything to sort out!).

Onesleeptillwembley Mon 05-Aug-13 19:11:47

A tax return isn't for claiming back expenses. It's for declaring income and expenditure (very basic explanation). Did you tell HMRC that you wanted to de register as self employed?

NarkyNamechanger Mon 05-Aug-13 19:13:20

No you file a tax return if you are self employed and you aren't paying your income tax and national insurance through PAYE (pay as you earn) as an employee.

If you are required to complete a self assessment they will usually write to you to tell you it's time, but if you left the country presumably you told them you were no longer SE?

Nannyme1 Mon 05-Aug-13 19:28:48

Cr@p!!

I did ring up to say I was no longer self employed they said I would get a letter and email about it but I never did and did forget about it with the family situation that I had to go home to.

I never started working as self employed. I decided to be employed so have been paying income tax and NI through paye but never did tax return.

What is the best thing to do now then? Make sure my de registering for self employed actually went through? How do I even do a tax return for au that has passed 11/12 ??? Am I best of getting an accountant to try and help sort it out???

And idea of what fines I am going to be up for?

Nannyme1 Mon 05-Aug-13 19:30:05

*a year that

Nannyme1 Mon 05-Aug-13 20:23:52

Just to add that I haven't actually worked a full tax year one year I worked 4 months the next 7 months if that makes any difference.

A only finding forms for self employed (which I'm not) I'm so f*cking confused. PLEASE HELP!!!

NarkyNamechanger Mon 05-Aug-13 21:13:36

That just means you should have filled out 2 returns instead of one.

Give hmrc a call, they really are very helpful.

Onesleeptillwembley Mon 05-Aug-13 23:16:39

Right. Stop panicking. They may want details for the time you were registered. As you didn't actually make anything and you de registered there shouldn't be many probs. ring up. They're human and mainly nice grin. This can be sorted, if there is anything to sort, very easily.

Gruntfuttocks Mon 05-Aug-13 23:20:09

Agree that it doesn't sound as though you have anything to worry about as you have paid PAYE and so they shouldn't be chasing you for any money. It's perfectly possibly to file returns for previous years if they require you to do so, but if you never worked as anything other than an employee, there shouldn't be any need.

Nannyme1 Tue 06-Aug-13 20:54:52

Thanks everyone I'm a little less worried have got a day or two off this week so I will ring up and sort it out.

Onesleeptillwembley Tue 06-Aug-13 21:12:14

Good, sooner the better, for your own peace of mind. It'll be fine. smile

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