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Gift of money to buy house then moving into house.

(11 Posts)
bumface Wed 30-Jan-13 13:14:32

Hello,
My mother gave us a gift of approx. 100k towards buying our house and now she has moved in with us as she needs looking after.
Will anyone need to pay tax on the money she gave us and are there any other implications I haven't thought of.
Her estate is less than 325K so I am assuming inheritance tax isn't a problem. I assume if she needed to go into care we would have to sell up when her savings ran out to pay for it. I am hoping it wont come to that as I am happy to care for her.
thank you in advance.

Notmadeofrib Wed 30-Jan-13 14:12:50

Is her estate less than £325 with or without the gift?

When did your mum give you the money? I think the timescale is relevant.

NatashaBee Wed 30-Jan-13 14:14:59

I would get specialist advice. Large gifts may suggest that she is trying to 'deprive herself of capital' if she eventually needs to go into a care home.

bumface Wed 30-Jan-13 14:53:22

The gift is included in her estate which is well under 325. It all happened in the last year.
What sort of specialist advice would you suggest? A solicitor maybe? Does the CAB still exist?

CogitoErgoSometimes Wed 30-Jan-13 15:39:53

Does your mother plan to have title to your home in exchange for her cash gift? Or will it be in your name and she will simply be another occupant? Inheritance tax isn't an issue as her total estate is below the threshold and if she doesn't technically own part of your property she can't be forced to sell it at a future date. If she doesn't need long-term care for several years I don't even think she'd be accused of deprivation of capital.

CogitoErgoSometimes Wed 30-Jan-13 15:40:30

Should add.... there is no tax to be paid on cash gifts.

digerd Wed 30-Jan-13 16:25:19

Unless the Tax has changed, there was a limit per year for a doner, over that doner had to declare it on tax return.

Notmadeofrib Wed 30-Jan-13 20:49:40

digerd that's not correct. If it's a PET, which the above is, it only gets declared should the donee die and then within 7 years and then only relevant if the estate is above £325 including all gifts (possibly reaching back up to 14 years, not just 7 as the PET activates the previous 7 years too)

Here is a link concerning deprivation, worth a read: www.ageuk.org.uk/home-and-care/care-homes/deprivation-of-assets-in-the-means-test-for-care-home-provision/

bumface Thu 31-Jan-13 11:55:35

Hello again,
Thank you ever so much for taking the time to reply.
You have been very helpful.

digerd Thu 31-Jan-13 16:34:50

This was on my self-assessment yearly tax form .

clarasebal Wed 18-Sep-13 19:32:27

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