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Maternity pay and contract work

(5 Posts)
Nickname1980 Thu 22-Nov-12 11:59:02

Thank you that's helpful! I will definitely investigate.

My situation had become more confusing as I have been offered a maternity cover post somewhere else. I have asked for advice about that on another post too!

MrAnchovy Thu 15-Nov-12 19:45:04

Would you recommend I do this time?

I'd need to know a few more details before giving you a specific recommendation, but Limited Company status becomes tax efficient at surprisingly low levels of income (below £20k) and has few drawbacks.

Nickname1980 Thu 15-Nov-12 17:02:00

Thanks for that! So I'd have to freelance for at least six months before I have a sort of "maternity leave" and be paying NI. In the past when I've freelanced, I haven't become a limited company. Would you recommend I do this time?

Thank you for your advice!

MrAnchovy Tue 13-Nov-12 13:43:58

If you are registered self employed for six months and pay Class 2 National Insurance contributions at £2.65 a week you are entitled to Maternity Allowance of £135.45 for up to 39 weeks.

It doesn't matter if your work dries up, it is payment of (at least 13 weeks of) Class 2 contributions that qualifies you.

Note that many freelancers find it beneficial (or are forced to by the companies engaging them) to operate as a Limited Company. Using the most common arrangement you should be entitled to £129.60 of either SMP or MA depending on circumstances.

Nickname1980 Tue 13-Nov-12 11:49:45

Hi there,

My contract ends in my company in July and I was planning to freelance after that.

Does anyone know what a freelancer is entitled to when they are pregnant (like maternity leave)?

Or if my freelance work dries up for a few months before my baby is born, am I entitled to any kind of maternity benefit?

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