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School photos and parental responsibility

(12 Posts)
NotaDisneyMum Wed 21-Nov-12 11:27:26

STIDW The head of my local primary says that their insurers require the permissions slips for photographs - which presumably is separate from the legal position?

Theas18 Wed 21-Nov-12 11:26:59

Bang their heads together?

Sorry no practical advice I know individual parental splits are acrimonious but this sounds like one parent just being anti the other and the poor kid is in the middle

STIDW Wed 21-Nov-12 11:25:12
STIDW Wed 21-Nov-12 11:24:20

Dept of Education current guidance to schools;

^Obtaining consent

Where schools need parental consent to outings and activities, headteachers should seek the consent from the resident parent unless the decision is likely to have a long-term and significant impact on the child or the non-resident parent has requested to be asked for consent in all such cases.
In cases where the school considers it necessary to seek consent from both parents, it is possible that one gives consent and the other withholds it. When this happens it is best to assume that parental consent has not been given. Such an approach safeguards the position of the school, ensuring that it is not exposed to any potential civil liability if, for example, the child is injured while on the school trip.^

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/pupilsupport/parents/a0014568/parental-responsibility

However I have it on pretty good authority (human rights QC) that consent isn't required to photograph children at school.

NotaDisneyMum Wed 21-Nov-12 07:19:21

Is this the annual permission slip for photos of a child to be taken rather than the professional portrait?

Although either parent with PR can give independent consent for their DCs, it seems that schools, Drs etc are increasingly risk averse and will ask for both parents to consent if there is any indication of disagreement.

If one parent refuses and the other agrees, then it becomes an issue for the school if something untoward happens - the parent who refused could take legal action against the school for putting their DC at risk.

It is an emerging issue though - even transport companies who are hired by schools request the permission slips now!

My DDs school asked for permission from both me and her Dad for her leavers residential trip, and I have written to her new school telling them that they cannot assume that I have consented if her Dad signs a permission slip for DD.

Hulababy Wed 21-Nov-12 03:05:02

For annual school pics - We send a letter home for parents to decline. If no response it gets taken.

picturesinthefirelight Tue 20-Nov-12 21:27:49

I didn't know schools needed consent to have school photos taken. They just appear in their school bags!

Hulababy Tue 20-Nov-12 21:24:52

I guess it depends on the reasons why one wants one and the other is declining maybe. But tbh they are adults and there is a child involved - they need to both act like grown ups and start discussing things properly, or find a way round it.

But the resident parent shouldn't always have their choices set as the only thing that matters.

Collaborate Tue 20-Nov-12 21:11:57

Decisions relating to education should be taken jointly, but I doubt that extends to school photographs.

inappropriatelyemployed Tue 20-Nov-12 19:29:02

I understand they do. I think there is animosity between them so a compromise is unlikely sadly.

Hulababy Tue 20-Nov-12 19:25:57

Do both have parental responsibility?
Why can parents not organise between themselves?
Is there a scompromise?

inappropriatelyemployed Tue 20-Nov-12 19:24:38

Does anyone know what happens when one parent (with whom the child lives) refuses consent for the child to have school photos taken but the other parent (who has no contact) requests school to go ahead?

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