Uni fees - unseemly rush to increase ?

(9 Posts)
LurkingHusband Wed 20-Jul-16 17:25:29

www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-36845106

Universities in England are already announcing a tuition fee increase above the £9,000 limit before Parliament has even finished debating plans which would pave the way to raise fees.

(contd)

scaryteacher Wed 20-Jul-16 17:45:40

I note that my ds's university is one of those advertising increased fees from 2017 according to the DT.

Jenijena Wed 20-Jul-16 17:48:08

Universities also get completely blasted if they don't provide full fine and absolute detail of what they provide and what their charges are...

LIZS Wed 20-Jul-16 17:49:54

I posted about this on the y13 thread. Ds was recently assured by our mp , then in D of E, that there were no such plans hmm

CuboidalSlipshoddy Wed 20-Jul-16 17:57:42

Unless you're working in a university and involved in course design and recruitment you cannot begin to imagine the (in my view utterly ludicrous) fear of the Competitions and Markets Authority. It's referred to as the CMA, and I fantasise about the Country Music Association getting involved instead. The claim is that if we don't lay out, in detail, at the point at which people are making decisions about where to apply, the likely costs and course structure (down to module level) of courses, then an unspecified bad thing which no-one can articulate will happen.

In reality, there have been a handful of cases in which students have turned up to find the building unfinished, the course non-existent and the lecturers not even interviewed, mostly (although not exclusively) at institutions which one might euphemistically describe as "very much at the 'recruiting' end of things". There are not going to be major legal ructions over not giving two years' notice of changing your first year introductory course in the semiotics of beer towels from 20% to 30% continuous assessment, but the paranoia is genuinely stalking the corridors.

Bumping up costs, even for home/EU students who are entitled to matching loans, is probably worrying a few places to the point that they have decided to advertise an upper bound. They should stop being frightened of shadows.

LurkingHusband Wed 20-Jul-16 18:04:19

Unless you're working in a university and involved in course design and recruitment you cannot begin to imagine the (in my view utterly ludicrous) fear of the Competitions and Markets Authority.

Oh, I can. In a previous role we were under the eye of the CMA and had to be prepared for a "dawn raid", where I had to ignore my boss and do what the nice man from the CMA said (getting reports off the system etc).

MsRinky Wed 20-Jul-16 18:39:58

The fear of the CMA and being found guilty of not "selling" your "customers" the precise "product" they have "purchased" is very prevalent in the University I work in.

And don't forget, the £9k cap has been in place for five years, which essentially means fees have effectively been falling for that period. If there had been inflationary increases applied every year, the fees would already be about £13k, as it's only recently that the official measures of inflation have been practically zero.

LurkingHusband Thu 21-Jul-16 14:50:40

I notice they are now applying rises to existing students

www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-36856026

CuboidalSlipshoddy Thu 21-Jul-16 15:09:51

I notice they are now applying rises to existing students

The BBC could do with employing people with better writing skills.

Headline: University tuition fees rise to £9,250 to include current students

Lede: could apply to students who have already started courses.

Body: endless further refinements and nuance. And it's only a white paper anyway at the moment.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now