Hinkley Nuclear Power Plant - how do you feel about it?

(59 Posts)
AnandaTimeIn Mon 21-Oct-13 18:52:47

I don't live in UK - not far though, and visit a lot - but I am quite worried about this....

After Fukushima, and the report that radiation from it is leaking into the sea...shock

Do "they" really think this is going to be cheaper/better?! What about our health?!

How did this get through without a murmur from the public.
Seems a done deal with Chinese investment...

www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-24604218

DoctorTwo Iran Mon 21-Oct-13 19:59:11

I'm appalled for a number of reasons. That we're building a nuclear power station, that we're allowing foreign governments to do so, that we're giving them a guaranteed minimum price. That last one is particularly galling, it's practically double the current price, so they can fix a price for a corporation but not for customers? Fucking typical.

AnandaTimeIn Mon 21-Oct-13 20:39:13

I'm appalled too Doctor.

And amazed this has gone down a done deal...

flatpackhamster Mon 21-Oct-13 21:20:25

AnandaTimeIn

I don't live in UK - not far though, and visit a lot - but I am quite worried about this....

After Fukushima, and the report that radiation from it is leaking into the sea...shock

Presumably you can point to some good examples of faults likely to collapse and cause a tsunami that will deluge the UK? Otherwise, Fukushima is a really poor example of a reason not to have a nuclear plant.

Do "they" really think this is going to be cheaper/better?!

Better than what? The lights going out?

What about our health?!

What about our health? The health risks are far lower than living near a coal-fired plant.

How did this get through without a murmur from the public.

Because we like the lights on.

A decade ago, when the original plan was put before the government, the costs for running Hinkley were 1/4 of what they are now. Worth considering, that, and worth considering why it's suddenly 4x more expensive than it was when Gordon Brown failed to sign it off. Here's a hint - it's not evil corps profiteering.

carlajean Mon 21-Oct-13 22:39:12

I'm relieved. Unfortunately this decision should have been made 10 years ago, but Labour was too busy pretending the problem would go away if we built enough wind turbines, but better late than never.
If anyone who objects can offer an alternative source of energy to keep our lights on I'd be interested to hear it.

WestieMamma Mon 21-Oct-13 23:11:56

The problem at Fukishima wasn't the reactor but the 'temporary' spent fuel storage tanks. I think we need to resolve the long term storage issue before creating more waste.

carlajean Tue 22-Oct-13 07:21:55

The problem at Fukushima was that the freak wave wiped out the emergency cooling systems, so that the spent fuel overheated. The design for the station was old and modern stations have better provisions for this kind of event.
In the end, there is a risk involved, which, in the circumstances, I feel we need to take. In France EDF, who will building and running this station, have 56 nuclear power stations, with no incidents.
Lastly, there is no alternative.

Fedup1976 Tue 22-Oct-13 07:39:46

I'm happy, as my DH works for Rolls Royce in the UK who are working on the procurement side of things. Part of the deal to build it is that 70% of the supply chain for the construction of the plant must be UK based.

MrsCinnamon Tue 22-Oct-13 07:53:01

Oh yes there are alternatives. By 2020 Germany will have closed down all nuclear power stations.
Where there's a will, ...

Alibabaandthe40nappies Tue 22-Oct-13 07:57:00

I think it is a good deal.

A guy on radio 4 yesterday was saying that the fixed price they have offered is lower than other non-carbon sources - wind, biomass etc.

It should have been agreed a long time ago.

sleeplessbunny Tue 22-Oct-13 07:59:26

I am saddened that the only way the UK can achieve this is with foreign investment and expertise. A generation ago, we were amongst the world leaders in nuclear technology.

I strongly believe that nuclear power has to be part of the UK's energy plan if we want to avoid being plunged into darkness. Successive governments have been so fearful of the public's response to nuclear that we are now left in an extremely vulnerable position energy-wise.

carlajean Tue 22-Oct-13 08:03:06

So what are they going to use for power mrscinnamon?

SoupDragon Tue 22-Oct-13 08:12:47

Lastly, there is no alternative.

Yes there is. and there should be more put into improving renewable and clean energy sources.

Unless they have worked out a way to deal with the radiation and waste, this is bloody stupid.

Venushasrisen Tue 22-Oct-13 08:13:34

What worries me is that they've agreed that we will pay double, roughly, per unit for this power than we are paying now.

How can they estimate what we will be paying then, perhaps fracking will eventually take off and power will be relatively cheaper then, but the price is fixed.

carlajean Tue 22-Oct-13 09:04:10

Re the price fixing - well, if this and previous UK governments hadn't decided to use this business model it wouldn't have happened. A business is not going to invest millions of pounds in this project without an assured income. That's the way it is.
Still waiting to hear what alternative options would fill the gap.

DoctorTwo Iran Tue 22-Oct-13 09:04:30

carlajean Tue 22-Oct-13 08:03:06

So what are they going to use for power mrscinnamon?

Mostly by small scale privately owned solar arrays and wind turbines. They currently generate over 50% of their electricity this way.

In Spain there is an oversupply of solar power, such is the prevalence of small scale supply. In fact, the Spanish government are introducing a tax to 'persuade' homeowners to remove their panels and shore up the major suppliers.

flatpackhamster Tue 22-Oct-13 09:08:47

SoupDragon

Yes there is. and there should be more put into improving renewable and clean energy sources.

More renewables won't provide enough power to keep the lights on. Hinkley will deliver more power, more consistently, than any number of windmills, because with Nuclear (as with fossil fuel power plants) the maximum power can always be delivered. With windmills it can't and typically a windmill generates no more than 25% of its theoretical maximum capacity.

Using renewables doesn't give enough base load.

Unless they have worked out a way to deal with the radiation and waste, this is bloody stupid.

There are ways, but ecomentalists object to them, just like they object to anything nuclear.

DoctorTwo

Mostly by small scale privately owned solar arrays and wind turbines. They currently generate over 50% of their electricity this way.

Germany generates 50% of its power through renewables? That's news to me.

Haven't there been several pieces in the press lately where German businesses are complaining that they're losing competitiveness because electricity prices have doubled?

MinesAPintOfTea Tue 22-Oct-13 09:17:57

I think its a great idea. For starters I would like the lights to stay on with the minimum possible greenhouse gas emissions, that requires nuclear power. As it is we still stand to not have enough power towards the end of this decade before Hinkley will be built.

As for Fukishima, thousands were killed outright by the tsunami and none by radiation wiki. Changing the UK power policy based on that incident would be plain daft. As you don't live in the UK I presume you aren't anxious about whether you will have power to work/heat your home/cook after 2015?

carlajean Tue 22-Oct-13 09:23:04

The Spanish energy market is in a terrible situation. They have to maintain conventional power stations as back up for when the alternative sources don't work, and these also have to subsidize alternative energy. What supporters of alternative energy supplies forget is that you still have to have back up.

carlajean Tue 22-Oct-13 09:25:04

Also, I can't see Germany industry being powered by solar arrays and wind turbines.

Flicktheswitch Tue 22-Oct-13 09:35:06

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

MrsCinnamon Tue 22-Oct-13 09:48:01

I can. After Fukushima there was a huge public outcry to scrap the remaining nuclear power stations. Germany has always been very pro-alternative energy.
The scheme where private people can put solar panels on their roofs and have a guaranteed taker for their energy is a thorn in the side of the big energy companies who don't for a second think of the environment.

Many people in Germany have always been against nuclear energy. Because there is no safe solution to get rid of the waste. We create more and more of it without being able to dispose if it.
Therefore Germans are generally willing to pay more for green energy. So am I.

carlajean Tue 22-Oct-13 10:08:00

I remember a programme on Radio 4 recently, reporting on a large German town (Frieburg I think) where they had gone all-out on solar power. Unfortunately they still needed conventional power stations for most of their power. Alternative sources cannot supply our needs.

DoctorTwo Iran Tue 22-Oct-13 10:17:22

Just for you flatpack

carlajean Tue 22-Oct-13 11:41:06

So we're going to depend on There being 'especially sunny and windy conditions'? Great

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