New primary school curriculum draft 'riddled with errors'

(5 Posts)
ReallyTired Thu 06-Dec-12 08:50:57

"Have not got the evidence to back this up but common sense suggests it is true. "

Finland is a good example. Classes are no more than 20 and there are no tables like England. There are also no tests until 14. The children an interest in learning rather than an interest in what national curriculum level they are.

lorisparkle Tue 04-Dec-12 21:38:03

I read an article that stated that countries where the main education decisions are made by experts in education rather than opinionated politicians (where opinions change far to regularly) have much better education results.

Have not got the evidence to back this up but common sense suggests it is true.

ReallyTired Mon 03-Dec-12 13:09:23

I think its a good idea allowing experts to contribute to the curriculum. It will prevent misconceptions at secondary school level.

Primary school teachers are experts in children rather than Physics, Biology or top Mathematicans. I think the nit picking done by various societies is healthy. This is a draft curriculum. The experts in various fields have made constructive comments. Hopefully education experts can take these comments on board.

GrrrArghZzzzYaayforall8nights Mon 03-Dec-12 12:59:02
GrrrArghZzzzYaayforall8nights Mon 03-Dec-12 12:55:34

[[http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/9715146/New-primary-school-curriculum-riddled-with-errors.html ]]

An article discussing experts in English Maths, and a range of Sciences pointing out errors in the new curriculum drafted for primary schools.

I found it surprising that certain facts are so prescribed - such as number of stars in the Milky Way. Not sure how surprised I am that the gov't got that vastly wrong.

This article filled me questions. Do teachers really need this? Do we need to bring in more experts into these things at an earlier stage -- wouldn't they be better at it than politicians? I've seen some great educational resources written be people in these areas - particularly for science and history - but they seem to be ridden over by politicians. Should the curriculum be taken out of the hands of politicians?

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