Go on shock me... how much are your DC's Hall of Residence fees per term (where? catered/self catering?)

(67 Posts)
olympicfan Sat 03-Sep-16 08:28:47

Just that!

Lilaclily Sat 03-Sep-16 08:31:08

These are our options

www.kent.ac.uk/accommodation/canterbury/apply/Price.html

shock

RockyRoadster Sat 03-Sep-16 08:55:18

These are ours

www.aber.ac.uk/en/accommodation/fees/

OhTheRoses Sat 03-Sep-16 08:59:18

I think DS's catered hall for first year 2014 was about £7500.

He had a house last year and it was about the same with bills and food. Flat this year will be more expensive.

MrsBartlet Sat 03-Sep-16 10:16:31

Between £1500-£1600 a term; catered and en-suite; Cambridge.

AtiaoftheJulii Sat 03-Sep-16 10:24:24

Dd1's last year was about £1290 for a 9 week term, not catered, not en suite.

Dd2's this year is £4760 for 38 weeks (which is about 3x£1587) - building is about three years old and very nice, she has en suite but is self catered.

romanvilla Sat 03-Sep-16 10:33:35

2 at once here, gulp.
£6.2K & £5.7K both ensuite SC.
No the most expensive on the list either.

AtiaoftheJulii Sat 03-Sep-16 10:58:16

This is why I'm glad dd2 went north grin

Dd1's house is just under £5200 this year for a 12 month lease, which started 6 July and the house has been empty all summer, and the agency still haven't fixed all the things wrong with it (like the hot tap in the sink in the downstairs bathroom not working, or making sure all the bedrooms actually have a desk chair as promised to go with their desks) angry

ladyedith Sat 03-Sep-16 11:06:04

My ds is going to Birmingham uni and his s/c room is £3889 for the year. Nice too and close to campus so no travel costs. I think he's been lucky.

Ifailed Sat 03-Sep-16 11:08:11

With the ever-increasing cost of being a student, I'm surprised more don't go to a local college, rather then in another town. Of course, if you live in the middle of nowhere, or are studying a specialised course then there might be no choice, but as all major towns now seem to have a university, and all offer the most popular courses, why choose to saddle young women/men with large debts?

poisonedbypen Sat 03-Sep-16 11:22:45

Because they want experience away from home?
£6250 self catering, en suite for 43 weeks last year. Private halls so more than uni ones (no choice, was back up uni)

Ifailed Sat 03-Sep-16 11:35:58

Because they want experience away from home?

Yes, I can understand that, but then why is it only those teenagers who are able to get to Uni to do this - if it's such a life affirming thing, why don't all 18 year olds to move out for 3 years?

haybott Sat 03-Sep-16 12:04:19

I'm surprised more don't go to a local college, rather then in another town.

But it depends what level of university you are aiming at. Most people don't live within commuting distance of a top 10 or 20 university and a degree from your local middle or low ranked university is not equivalent to a degree from a top university, even if the subjects are the same.

In any case the fees everywhere are 9k per year (and will increase from next year at most places). Students living at home will have expenses of at least several k per year and are eligible for student loans for these (although less than those who live away from home). So staying at home would still cost 35k+ for a three year degree. The extra 15k needed to live away from home could well be worth it if the course you choose is significantly better, because in any case you repay the student loans based on a percentage of income - it takes longer to repay the loans if you borrow an extra 15k but you don't pay higher monthly payments.

I would myself encourage my own children to think about going to our nearest universities and living at home, if they were looking at comparable ranking institutions away from home. But I wouldn't encourage my kids to go to a local low ranking ex-poly over Oxbridge, Durham, UCL etc just to save money in the short term.

BeJayKayven Sat 03-Sep-16 12:09:55

why is it only those teenagers who are able to get to Uni to do this - if it's such a life affirming thing, why don't all 18 year olds to move out for 3 years?

Because teenagers aren't one homogenous blob - being individuals, they will choose to do what suits them.

boys3 Sat 03-Sep-16 12:13:10

as all major towns now seem to have a university, and all offer the most popular courses, why choose to saddle young women/men with large debts?

maybe the yawning chasm in quality. IFS did an interesting study released last October www.ifs.org.uk/publications/8233 , included the finding that for 23 Uni's (not named though) median earnings after ten years for their graduates were lower than that for non graduates

BeJayKayven Sat 03-Sep-16 12:16:53

Anyway back to Op..
Glasgow, self catering ensuite room with huge shared kitchen is £400ish per month (eek)

boys3 Sat 03-Sep-16 12:22:27

back to the OP's question though.

red brick, fully catered, no en-suite £330 per term.

That was however back in the 1982/83 academic year. No wi-fi either back then, fond memory of huddling round a black and white portable TV with the rest of the corridor to watch the first ever episode of Brookside smile and queuing to use the payphone in the JCR bar to ring home

Accommodation specs have certainly moved on since but if that £330 had risen in line with inflation since 1982 it would be something like £1050 per year today, or around £3,100 for three tems.

MaitlandGirl Sat 03-Sep-16 12:29:38

University is very expensive in the UK - my eldest two go to one of the top 10 universities in Australia and would be paying around £2500 per year for s/c accommodation (single ensuite room) or £4800 per year fully catered (single ensuite room).

Their fees work out about £3400 (English) and £4850 (pharmacy) per annum.

They've both chosen to live at home and get the train in (about an hour journey) as it's cheaper and easier to pay rent here than move out.

BoneyBackJefferson Sat 03-Sep-16 12:38:52

£85 per week 51 week contract, en suite, self catering.

bojorojo Sat 03-Sep-16 14:34:00

DD paid £8200 in London for self catering and en suite (50 weeks) 2 years ago. It is now £1000 more!!! A bigger room is now £12,000. Cheaper is available but not much choice and longer travelling times!

Ifailed Sat 03-Sep-16 15:02:45

Most people don't live within commuting distance of a top 10 or 20 university and a degree from your local middle or low ranked university is not equivalent to a degree from a top university
I get that, too. However there are 106 Uni's in England alone, so for the vast majority of students, it makes little difference where they go. So why add extra debt to the already huge Fees?

Katymac Sat 03-Sep-16 15:09:16

£75 a week B&B plus half in the holidays (but only from Sept to July) no en-suite

So about £2850 a year - now about to move into third year at same accommodation

She had to move away from home (at 16), she is at the nearest college that does her subject at the right level (I think there is now one closer but it only opened the year Dd did her first year)

Peaceandl0ve Sat 03-Sep-16 16:42:36

£6258 for a 42 week contract, en-suite self-catered. Had to go away from home because no uni in wales, let alone close to us, offers her course. On a positive though we are from wales, it is afive year course and the welsh govt is paying £5000 towards the tuition fees per year.

Personally i think moving away is a good thing anyway.

Ifailed Sat 03-Sep-16 17:09:40

Personally i think moving away is a good thing anyway
So all 18 year-olds should move away from home for 3 years? I know I've stated that above, but am intrigued by the concept.

Oly5 Sat 03-Sep-16 17:10:43

Because going to university is an amazing experience. I'd recommend it to anyone, debt or no debt

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