The D'oh!moment: Completely obvious homemaking tips that have, in fact, proved revelatory

(522 Posts)
ChicHeroine Tue 12-Mar-13 21:34:36

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

bran Tue 12-Mar-13 21:44:26

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

MrsHende Tue 12-Mar-13 21:46:29

I LOVE the bedding set in the pillowcase idea - I learned that one here on good old MN.

Another tip is Oven Pride. Amazing.

If you use stock cubes (I do!) I always used to make the stock up in a jug then add it to the stew or curry or whatever, then one day I thought doh! Why don't I crumble the cube into the stew and then add the water, no dirty jug to wash and it works!

MousyMouse Tue 12-Mar-13 22:02:12

putting washing powder directly into the drum.
no more manky drawer!

Bonsoir Wed 13-Mar-13 06:53:51

Organising your house by function. Think about how you actually do things before allocating storage, installing machines etc. Eg I changed my kitchen cupboards so that all the tea and coffee, and the tea and coffee cups, were right above the counter where the coffee machine and kettle are. I put the cereal and the cereal bowls in the same cupboard. Etc. That way people making breakfast for themselves don't have to open lots of different cupboards and move around the kitchen. I regularly change my cupboard/drawer allocations to optimise.

BigRedBox Wed 13-Mar-13 07:02:44

Having different baskets for different colours of washing. I used to have baskets per person then have to sort it out each time. Now I have 3 baskets for darks, brights, and whites. When one is full I do done washing. I cannot believe how long it took me to realise this.

MrsJamin Wed 13-Mar-13 07:06:11

Love the pillowcase idea! Going to be moving house in 5 weeks so am going to need new organisation tips. I actually think I might make a big diagram of all the things in the kitchen and what needs to be near what to optimise the use of the space! <need to get a life emoticon>

Love the three baskets for laundry.

Here's one. When you're cleaning kitchen bathroom etc. Spray where-ever you're cleaning - countertop for example. Then go away, make a cup of tea, put your feet up or do a bit of tidying. Go back after about 10 minutes and wipe. No scrubbing, no respraying. Cleaner has done all the work while it was sitting there. Blindingly obvious? yes but it took me years to work it out.

MrsJamin Wed 13-Mar-13 07:12:26

See, I always do the spray first then leave thing! You can get most stains up just by spraying water and leaving some time, then go back with a microfibre cloth.

Use disposable foil containers for lasagne, shepherds pie, fish pie, even roasts etc and just bin them when you're done - no washing up.

MrsJamin Wed 13-Mar-13 07:16:58

yes, very eco-friendly tip butterflies hmm

NormaStanleyFletcher Wed 13-Mar-13 07:18:45

Am watching with interest

baskingseals Wed 13-Mar-13 07:24:09

cutting up food with scissors for small children.

sausages, pizza, chicken - anything really. does save time.

reading these tips with interest. specially like the 3 washing baskets idea, but where do you keep them?

Flisspaps Wed 13-Mar-13 07:34:45

Lots of fabulous tips on this thread and this thread grin

BigRedBox Wed 13-Mar-13 08:48:30

I have 3 like this
I keep them in my bedroom. They're really light for carting around as well. I'm considering moving to a 4 basket system for darks, brights, lights and whites. I seriously need a job grin

CuttedUpPear Wed 13-Mar-13 08:53:13

butterflies that's terrible. Do you not realise that the world is running low on resources?
I hope that you recycle all these containers.

Ok fair point and I do recycle, but how is a tinfoil tray a week worse than kitchen roll at the bottom of lunch boxes every day?

And what happened to no judgement allowed?

Bonsoir Wed 13-Mar-13 09:38:09

Tinfoil is aluminium and ought never to be used as a cooking utensil - very bad for your health smile

ThisIsMummyPig Wed 13-Mar-13 09:39:04

paper grows on trees, so is ultimately replacable. Tin foil is made from aluminum, which has to be mined, which is generally bad for the environment.

If you were recycling them, then surely you would have to wash them up anyway?

I consider my wrist slapped - thank you

RooneyMara Wed 13-Mar-13 09:50:37

This one crept up on me through sheer laziness but similar to the worktop one, if you leave your dishes and plates and cutlery in the sink with water in them overnight, or just for an hour, then wash them, all they need is a quick going over with a sponge and WUL and then a quick rinse. Most of the stuck on stuff just comes off with water and a bit of time.

Also I was veggie for so long and couldn't be bothered to cook meat for years after that, that I never realised how AWFUL it is tryign to wash up after cooking meat.

The amount of fat from say sausages in a baking tray is dreadful. I can't imagine what that does to our bodies.

So go as veggie as possible and you'll have a lot easier washing up smile

RooneyMara Wed 13-Mar-13 09:51:54

oh and always put the washing up liquid directly onto the sponge, not into the water. Wash everything, then rinse it all at once.

notcitrus Wed 13-Mar-13 09:52:30

Manky kitchen roll helps the compost balance all the old slimy veg.

My revelation thanks to MN is that if you have stubborn limescale in the toilet, scoop out most of the water first, making your stuff to dissolve it much more concentrated and more effective. Obvious, but finally I've got rid of brown stained limescale that bottles of stuff over 7 years havent dented.

Chigley1 Wed 13-Mar-13 09:53:25

At the age of 40, just had revelation that if you group all cutlery when you put it into the dishwasher it saves a lot of time when removing it.

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