Hotplate/Hostess/Slow Cooker?

(7 Posts)
RoseWei Sun 30-Dec-12 13:11:36

Soon, I'll be working 3 evenings a week - and won't be at home in the day. Only DS at home now is just 17 but doesn't cook for himself. Will snack OK but not cook but I guess he might heat up ..

If I prepare dishes, I'm wondering if I should go for a hotplate - a Hostess which can be charged up and then it keeps food hot for a good length of time - or a small slow cooker which he can put back on to finish the job.

The alternative is buying him fish and chips on the way home (not good - pricey - OK once in a while) - making something when I'm home at 9.30pm (too late) - teaching him to cook! I favour the latter but I also want him to have a square meal at a reasonable time in the evening and I'm happy to make in advance - at least once or twice a week.

Anyone experience of heating food up in any of these ways? Does a hotplate keep food hot - it doesn't heat up effectively from cold, does it?

Many thanks!

LIZS Sun 30-Dec-12 13:15:51

Teach him to cook or use a microwave. What meals are you likely to pre-prepare ?

wheredidiputchristmas Sun 30-Dec-12 14:00:48

I agree with LIZS.

Teach him how to cook a selection of simple meals.

Surly he can cook a shop bought pie and veg/sausage and mash by himself for example.

HazeltheMcWitch Sun 30-Dec-12 14:08:55

He's 17, old enough to leave home, join armed forces or marry (with your permission), drive, fly a plane...

Time for him to learn to cook. I can really recommend Jamie Oliver's Ministry of Food, which teaches cookery from zero knowledge/experience, but in a really nice, Jamie-ish way.

BoffinMum Sun 30-Dec-12 14:40:11

I think it's worth teaching him to cook. I would teach him the following recipes:

Pasta carbonara
Spaghetti bolognaise
Baked potatoes with tuna mayonnaise/baked beans/cheese
Chicken curry made with bottled sauce, and microwaved rice
How to grill a pork/lamb chop
How to boil potatoes
Prepping and boiling carrots/broccoli
Cooking frozen peas and green beans
Sausage and mash
Egg and bacon

He'll never die of starvation if he can cook that lot. And he ought to be getting your supper ready as well on those days, tbh.

winterdays Sun 30-Dec-12 17:03:28

A beef stew in the slow cooker is very easy and is a complete meal. You can put potatoes and veg in all together.
Dont put much liquid in - look for a recipe in the food section here.
You can do a large pot of bolangaise in the slow cooker - again dont put too much liquid in.
Cook two large lasagnas on a sun and then portion them up. Freeze some and keep some for the week.
You can get slow cookers with timers too.
Depending on the time you start work - put veg on the bottom of the slow cooker with garlic and onions, chicken pieces on top with some oil and seasoning and it is a ready meal but only needs about 6 hours and you need to be careful with chicken so try it out.
Good luck with the job

RoseWei Sun 30-Dec-12 17:33:13

Thank you, all. I agree - DS should be cooking rather than expecting late night F & C or having me up until late making a meal. I do too much for him (and his siblings - doesn't always pay) and I would far rather not hand out money on a hotplate until I think I really need one.

When DS was a lot younger, he and I signed up to Jamie's 'Pass It On' campaign - and DS took a keen interest in the JO school meals programmes and in cooking at home. Teenage years have seen lots of things slip ...

Thanks, winter, for the slow cooker recipe - I think a slow cooker with a timer would be a good investment anyway. And others, thanks again - Hazel - we have Ministry of Food and, I agree, it's very clearly and entertainingly written. Boffin - supper for me, too - I've become to used to doing everything in the kitchen myself, this hadn't occurred to me - thanks.

And with DS getting ready for AS levels, cooking is going to be a relaxing, practical antidote.

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