What does FTE mean?

(14 Posts)
daniellewilson1987 Sun 07-Aug-16 20:33:03

Im currently applying for jobs and have seen a job that states it is £16500FTE depending on experience
Its in a college and states the work is term time only although doesnt clarify how many hours! Im confused if that means its £16500 or less if thats what the pay would be if it was for a full year and not term time only. If anyone can clear it up for me that would be great
Thanks

Just5minswithDacre Sun 07-Aug-16 20:33:41

Full time equivalent

AyeAmarok Sun 07-Aug-16 20:34:01

Full Time Equivalent.

mortil2 Sun 07-Aug-16 20:34:39

Full time equivalent

Just5minswithDacre Sun 07-Aug-16 20:34:44

It's usually used in respect of PT roles.

daniellewilson1987 Sun 07-Aug-16 20:35:33

So the pay would only be around £12000 for full time work?

mortil2 Sun 07-Aug-16 20:35:36

Oops x post with everyone else

Redcrayons Sun 07-Aug-16 20:35:45

Full time equivalent. You would get less than £16500 depending on how many hours.

daniellewilson1987 Sun 07-Aug-16 20:40:18

Ok thank you for all your quick replies, i have just noticed it doesnt even say how many hours just fixed term/ term time only

Just5minswithDacre Sun 07-Aug-16 20:49:20

Is it administrative? That might explain it.

So working 39(?) weeks instead of 48ish for a FT, all year role? And the salary pro-rataed to that?

Just5minswithDacre Sun 07-Aug-16 20:50:27

Pro-rated. So still FT in term times?

Teaching positions, I understand, are paid differently.

daniellewilson1987 Sun 07-Aug-16 20:53:40

Its for a student achievement coach. So it would be £16500 ÷ 52 and then × by 41? Just wish people recruiting would be honest with their application

apivita Sun 07-Aug-16 20:56:10

They are being honest. Many jobs particularly in colleges or universities will say FTE and depending on it being term time, they will pay accordingly.

Just5minswithDacre Sun 07-Aug-16 21:06:45

So it would be £16500 ÷ 52 and then × by 41?

It depends how they're treating holiday.

If it was me I'd hedge my bets with a rough (£16500 / 50) X 40 calculation. So 4/5s or £13200. And use that as my guide until it's clarified.

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