Could I change career to HR?

(20 Posts)
Hoppityhippityhop Sat 09-May-15 17:52:36

I've spent nearly two decades in a blue light service, in front line or very close to front line roles. I am now seriously considering leaving but I want to plan my exit properly.
I think HR may be a field that would interest me but would HR be interested in me?
I am educated to degree level but I don't have any further qualifications or training that would be recognised outside of my current employment.
I have briefly looked at courses for HR qualifications but I don't know which qualifications employers would expect. Is there an industry standard qualification?
Would employers welcome someone with my employment history?
Also is HR a sensible field to invest my time and money training in? Are there enough roles out there?

GirlsonFilm Sat 09-May-15 17:56:11

Check out the CIPD website, that should have lots of info about qualifications

twentyten Sat 09-May-15 18:00:20

Cipd is the recognised professional body and provides accredited courses. Pay not the highest- Google hr jobs to see.

mamapants Sat 09-May-15 18:01:20

What is your degree in?
What kind of salary would you be hoping to get?
Without experience or a cipd qualification you would be looking at entry level jobs most likely.

Hoppityhippityhop Sat 09-May-15 18:20:12

Thanks. Good to know there are recognised qualifications, at least there is a starting point.
My degree is in history, so not massively helpful.
Unfortunately I have to assume that any job I might get after I leave this one will be entry level because there is no private sector equivelant to what I do.
I'll do some Google searching.

Hoppityhippityhop Sat 09-May-15 18:23:10

I know of retired colleagues who have failed to secure jobs as shop staff and postmen so I'm under no illusion that my career will count for much with future employers! Hence trying to plan and train.

Temporaryanonymity Sat 09-May-15 18:28:28

What is it about HR that attracts you? If you are in a union become a shop steward or rep, this will give you some really useful experience and of course unions employ regional organisers. It's an alternative career to HR but probably a TU would value your previous career and experience as a positive.

Hoppityhippityhop Sat 09-May-15 18:35:59

I'm not allowed to be in a union....
I think I thought HR might interest me because it seems to be about people. I could be wrong!
The other career I'd considered re training for was primary school teaching but teachers seem to be fairly unhappy with things.

Temporaryanonymity Sat 09-May-15 18:37:48

Yes, it is about people but they don't always welcome HR interventions!

CarcerDun Sat 09-May-15 19:09:08

Is your current career police? If so, HR might not be a bad move as at least you won't have the illusion that deep down people are honest and nice wink

A lot of people think that being in HR is all about being in the know and talking to people. You need a clear head and to be able to separate the person (emotion) from the course of action. It's not about being the hand holder, although it is important to understand people and be able to communicate effectively. Conflict resolution skills and negotiation are a must, you need to be able to influence decision makers and make a clear case for courses of action.

Personally I love it.

Hoppityhippityhop Sat 09-May-15 19:14:26

Good guess Carcer!
What you've described are skills I have had to use and separations I have to make. What you've described is why I think HR would interest me.
What level of qualification should I aim to achieve to be taken seriously? It looks like there are three or four levels.

CarcerDun Sat 09-May-15 22:24:51

The qualifications have changed since I took them, but the standard you'd need for professional roles is generally post graduate level. I'll have a check.

CarcerDun Sat 09-May-15 22:34:06

CIPD

Hopefully this link works. So the new qualifications.

Level 3 is what you would expect an HR admin and/or entry level candidate to have or be working towards.

Level 5 is more of a career level one, possibly I think at this level it helps to be in an HR role to get the most out of the qualification. Also you'd hope to be funded through this one.

Level 7 is the professional qualification, most HR professional roles would be looking at you having achieved this or be working towards.

My advice would be to do the level 3 now as it will help you get entry level roles when you make the move. It will also help confirm that's the path you want. After that, you'd hope to be funded through qualifications with an employer.

Good luck!

CarcerDun Sat 09-May-15 22:37:18

...also I think it's a good crossover. Both roles that you need to be hard on the outside but couldn't do if you didn't actually care about people. I used to volunteer as an appropriate adult and can definitely see the link.

Hoppityhippityhop Sat 09-May-15 23:29:05

Great Carcer! Thanks for all your advice, you've really helped me.

Hoppityhippityhop Sat 09-May-15 23:52:33

In fact thanks to you all for taking the trouble to answer me.

GinBunny Sat 09-May-15 23:59:21

If you really want to get into HR then the level 7 qualification is the best course, you will become fully qualified. I did the level 3 course and am only part qualified, so struggling to find another job. There is a level 5 course, but it's not really recognised as well as the level 7. Good luck flowers

Hoppityhippityhop Sun 10-May-15 10:00:05

Good to know Gin. As I would be starting from scratch I need to put myself in a strong position.

Littlef00t Sun 10-May-15 15:18:39

Some of the courses are hard to complete withy being in role as they need experience or case studies thatbyounwiuldnt have access to. They are designed as on the job really.

Hoppityhippityhop Sun 10-May-15 17:32:56

Okay, also useful. Wouldn't want to sign up to a course I couldn't really complete.

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