How many levels of progress through KS1 if already Level 3?

(12 Posts)
MathsGeekMum Tue 20-May-14 11:08:23

D1 is in reception. He is working at a 2a -3c in maths (depending on the area).
Would he still be expected to make 2 levels of progress in Yr1/2 to become a level 4a/5c by the end of year 2, or because you would usually make 2 levels of progress in the 4 years of KS2, should he only be expected to be a 3a/4c by end of year 2?
(I'm hoping it's the latter as I don't want him to suffer massive unnecessary 'levels pressure' just because he reached some targets earlier than expected).

simpson Wed 21-May-14 21:47:11

DD finished reception on a 2A in reading.

Her end of year target for year 1 (where she is now) is a 3B.

However, she will be capped at a 3A in yr2.

dalziel1 Thu 22-May-14 06:46:55

Those are really good levels of attainment for a 4/5 year old. Was it all learned at school, or did you do some work at home?

I'd have thought it hugely unlikely that a KS1 teacher would be able to cater for a child working at year 5 or 6 level.

If you think about it, it would mean a one-to-one lesson one day to teach them co-ordinates in maths whilst simultaneously teaching the rest of the class to add numbers up to 20. Similarly, teaching the child all the different methods of multiplication and division (because they aren't allowed to just master one and move on). Then they'd have to see evidence that the child had mastered it. Same with geometry etc.

As to English, they'd need to have done the lessons about using quotation marks. Ditto the other punctuation and grammar lessons. Then, they would need a level of life experience to be able to answer the reading comprehension questions.

I believe that its hard enough to get sufficient help ("intervention") if your child sits at the other end of the ability spectrum.

IME, the words you will start saying over and over again are challenge, extend, enhance.

Progressing through these levels is all about independently demonstrating the skill on separate occasions and in different ways. If your child isn't given the chance to show that they can plot co-ordinates and reflect a shape through a point, then the official record will show that they do not know it.

Feenie Thu 22-May-14 06:51:23

However, levels are disappearing in September.

simpson Thu 22-May-14 09:39:41

Feenie - my understanding (although could be wrong) that a child currently in yr1 would have the levels until end of yr2.

MathsGeekMum Thu 22-May-14 09:52:48

Thanks Simpson that's reassuring.
As to levels disappearing I could be wrong, but assuming they will be replaced by something else to track progress, which could end up with the same pressure. But would be very glad if they weren't so all children were able to progress as suits them.
I don't really know where he has been taught to do the maths. A lot of it seems to be innate ability. I haven't taught him how to do things - I work full time so he has been in full time nursery since age 2. I had assumed the school had taught him, e.g. he was talking the other day about negative numbers and doing sums with them, but the school say that they haven't told him how to do that either. Some he has learnt through using a computer programme I think, as the school uses rmeasimaths from year 1. They let him use it as they knew he enjoyed maths and was slightly ahead. He whizzed through all the early levels including things that he shouldn't technically know. So presumably he was learning it from the programme as he went. The school are putting provision in place for him to be extended further 'properly'.

nonicknameseemsavailable Thu 22-May-14 11:13:47

interesting you mention about the online maths - he quite possibly has learned them off there. if he is naturally good at picking up concepts then he could do something on there and learn it that easily. DD has recently been given a login for a maths programme and has completed all of the year 1 stuff (she is yr1) without doing any of the online lessons, just did the assessments and is nearly halfway through the yr2 stuff. Don't think school have noticed she has done any of it yet. I would expect by the end of half term she will have done all of yr2. some she won't score as well on I shouldn't think (it is quite interesting to see which bits she just 'gets' very easily and which bits she is puzzled by) so she can then practice those.

jimblejambles Thu 22-May-14 11:32:22

Ds2 is in year 1 and working at 3a/4c for maths. The school have said they will keep at his pace. Luckily his teacher is the schools maths coordinator and already has in put in place an online maths programme for him and another girl working at the same level. They also have close links with a local high school so have said they are prepared as he moves up the school if needed.
Speak to his teacher and ask if they have plans etc if your ds continues to work at high levels.

jimblejambles Thu 22-May-14 11:33:45

Ds2 is in year 1 and working at 3a/4c for maths. The school have said they will keep at his pace. Luckily his teacher is the schools maths coordinator and already has in put in place an online maths programme for him and another girl working at the same level. They also have close links with a local high school so have said they are prepared as he moves up the school if needed.
Speak to his teacher and ask if they have plans etc if your ds continues to work at high levels.

KittyandTeal Thu 22-May-14 11:44:47

He will be expected to make 2 sub levels (or 3 in our school) no matter what year he is in.

Realistically he may not make that progress as some of the higher NC levels rely on some level of maturity (that comes with age and experience rather than attitude iyswim)

The max he will be reported at for y2 sats is a L3

Feenie Thu 22-May-14 19:58:43

That would be incorrect if levels still existed - level 4 is referred to consistently in the KS1 ARA and since the end of KS1 assessments are teacher assessed, a 4 would be perfectly acceptable.

However, since levels will only exist for 7 more weeks, it a bit of a redundant point.

Feenie Thu 22-May-14 20:08:12

Think so, Simpson, though even the DfE seem unsure. They will definitely be the last to do the new tests, but haven't seem any information on how they would be reported.

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