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Severe period pain and Buscopan - mears update - Mumsnet triumphs again

(8 Posts)
mears Sat 09-May-09 11:46:37

original thread

For those of you who posted on my original thread I thought I would give you an update.

We used brufen and buscopan in the 2 days leading up to DD's period and she was absolutely fine. She is delighted especially as she is sitting exams just now.

Will see what happens next month. I would never have thought to try it until reading it on here.

Thanks

foxinsocks Sat 09-May-09 14:19:25

oh mears, I'm absolutely delighted. I really felt for her when you explained how she was suffering because it reminded me of exactly how I felt at her age. It really can feel like a curse when periods are like that, even though you don't want to feel it's like that! I actually feel a bit tearful that it's worked blush. I'm so glad and hope her exams go ok. xx

mears Sat 09-May-09 15:16:36

Thanks foxinsocks smile

bobs Sun 30-Aug-09 14:19:24

I have dd aged nearly 16 with "killing womb/uterus" period pains (her words smile)- so pleased to find this thread - off to buy Buscopan when the shops open....on Tuesday!

Hi mears

Glad to hear that this is helping your DD currently.

I would though add a cavaet; if this stops being as effective to your DD within the next 3-6 months please get her to a gynaecologist for further investigation.

Most treatments tend to act well in the short term as the symptoms are being treated but they do not address the cause. Do bear that in mind. The cause needs to be determined particularly if she continues to suffer a lot of pain leading up to and during her period.

Endo is usually only determined through a laparoscopy (keyhole surgery). No other test of any sort will detect it if it is there.

Hi mears

Glad to hear that this is helping your DD currently.

I would though add a cavaet; if this stops being as effective to your DD within the next 3-6 months please get her to a gynaecologist for further investigation.

Most treatments tend to act well in the short term as the symptoms are being treated but they do not address the cause. Do bear that in mind. The cause needs to be determined particularly if she continues to suffer a lot of pain leading up to and during her period.

Endo is usually only determined through a laparoscopy (keyhole surgery). No other test of any sort will detect it if it is there.

Vigilanteawarenessraiser Mon 31-Aug-09 18:57:30

Hi Mears and Bobs,

Attila's right, I'm afraid (hi, Attila!) - even if the buscopan works, you do need to be taking this seriously. Severe pain is not normal, and research has shown that 70 to 90% of teenagers with this sort of pain are positive for endometriosis on laparoscopy. A lot of gynaecologists are still very ignorant when it comes to teenage endometriosis, and will tell you that it's very rare. It isn't: American research showed that almost two thirds of adult sufferers had the first symptoms as teenagers and 40% (off the top of my head) had their first symptoms before they were 15. The research also showed that the younger a girl began symptoms, the worse the outcome tended to be, with a much higher chance of severe disease (bowel or bladder involvement) and infertility. The obvious conclusion from the available research is that it should be taken very seriously when a teenager is experiencing this sort of pain.

I'm not listing all these stats with the intention of scaring you - just so that you will, hopefully, read up about it, keep a close eye on your daughters and hopefully get them to a gynaecologist who knows about endometriosis. I know I've got a huge bee in my bonnet about this. But I have reason to. If it's not taken seriously now, there is a chance that your daughters might end up like me. By the time I was in my mid 20s my endometriosis had damaged my bowel so much that it affected mt bowel control. I found it a very humiliating experience. I was also pale, thin and ill as a result of not being able to digest food properly, and I was frequently in pain and chronically tired. I had to have part of my bowel removed, among other things, and have been left with problems. I have to control my diet carefully and am on laxatives long-term. When I found out that the evidence on teenage endo is so strong and has been around for decades, I felt rather let down. I can still remember the frustration as a teenager of trying to get people to understand just how serious the problem was. But my family didn't take it seriously enough, and to my doctors, all the signs that there was something seriously wrong were outweighed by the one factor - my age - wwhich caused them to ignore things that should have been ringing warning bells. I have now had good surgery and have got used to living with such problems as I still have, but will always wonder if I might have been helped by earlier diagnosis.

The saddest thing of all is that my experience is not rare. Please, please don't let your daughters end up like me.
Have a look here and here (showing the results of a schools outreach programme in NZ which led to a three-fold increase in the diagnosis of teenage endometriosis).

Countingthegreyhairs Tue 01-Sep-09 19:01:24

So very glad that your dd has found some relief Mars. I really sympathise with her as I've had painful periods from the age of 15 and the pill was the only solution for me.

I don't want to throw a spanner in the works but for anyone else reading this thread - do be aware of the rare posible side effects of Buscopan - it makes me completely dizzy to the point where I am unsteady on my legs and walk in to furniture. V unpleasant. Most drugs have side-effects of course so definitely worth giving it a go.

Hope the exams go well Mars!

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