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Comparing types of Antihistamines

(19 Posts)
KatyMac Thu 06-Mar-14 15:58:04

I had some 'strong' antibiotics from the doctor - Fexofenadine hydrochoride (180mg)

How do these compare with over the counter antihistamines (like Piriton or Tesco)

As I will order more from the GP if I need to but use the others if they are similar

TIA

it may depend on the individual so you could try over the counter stuff if you like. The one you have been given is a non-sedating anti-histamine which is not the same as Piriton which is a sedating anti-histamine.

www.bupa.co.uk/individuals/health-information/directory/a/antihistamines#textBlock192575 - gives a list of sedting/non-sedating anti-histamines.

KatyMac Thu 06-Mar-14 20:44:56

Sedating or not isn't a massive deal mainly

I just want it to really work

sedating ones can cause drowsiness though so could be a factor if driving, etc

KatyMac Thu 06-Mar-14 21:59:50

I generally don't drive until later on

The one a day antihistamines don't cause any noticeable problems with drowsiness

I'll get the ones off the GP if they are stronger I just wasn't sure

piriton is not a once a day tablet though, it is taken a few times a day. Why not speak to a pharmacist/the gp and see if the ones you have been prescribed are any stronger than over the counter ones

KatyMac Thu 06-Mar-14 22:13:23

But the Tescos are one a day & so are the Fexofebadine

& I thought I had a pack of piriton one a day but they don't seem to sell them now

maybe it was piriteze you had which is a one a day non-sedating anti-histamine (contains cetirizene). The ones you mention are also non-sedating ones.

Maiziemonkey Fri 07-Mar-14 00:55:40

also be aware that different types could give different side effects due to slightly different site of action etc- I cannot take Piriton tablets because they give me hallucinations, not a very common side effect at all. I have had several other types without this problem (Loratidine and certerazine)

KatyMac Fri 07-Mar-14 08:31:20

I'm experimenting with the possibility that my food intolerances, ear/throat & mouth problems could be Oral Allergy syndrome

So I want a good strong antihistamine to see if it makes a difference

PtCatalyst Fri 07-Mar-14 15:17:27

I take either fexofenidine or certirizine for allergies daily. I think fexofenidine is marginally better, but certirizine will do if I don't have the fexofenidine to hand. I also take piriton (chlorphenamine) on top of the other if required, but last time I did it made me terribly drowsy - did remove the allergy symptoms though! In general, I find that for me the effects of a daily antihistamine last 26 hours, so I need to remember to take them at the same time each day or the symptoms come back.

KatyMac Fri 07-Mar-14 18:44:38

Thanks, that is really useful info

I'll get some more from the GP

gobbin Fri 07-Mar-14 19:00:45

They are all different drugs so aren't directly comparable. What works for one won't work for another.

I transferred to fexofenadine when they withdrew Triludan as it was the nearest in effect for me. My son started on cetirizine aged 9 and has gone through that, followed by loratadine, then acrivastine. He's now been on prescribed fexofanadine for two years aged 17). The others just stopped working for him.

KatyMac Fri 07-Mar-14 19:41:10

Thanks that helps too

Maybe I should alternate them (sort of monthly rather than daily wink)

gobbin Fri 07-Mar-14 23:47:22

I would find one that works for now and stick to it. We found that when exactly to take them was important for us.
If I'm staying with my mum who has dogs, I take extra steroid inhaler and start the antihistamines a week before I go. My son began his on 1st April last year and was only bothered by hayfever on one day before the end of the summer.
Contrast that with the year before when the acrivastine had stopped working, the doctor didn't have any appts and I had to dump a snivelling, swollen-eyed wreck at the Receptionists desk and ask to be seen as he had exams and couldn't see! Get your attack in early by keeping a level of meds in your bloodstream.

Piscivorus Sat 08-Mar-14 00:14:52

I'm not sure that any particular one is more potent than the others. I think it is just finding one that suits you to be honest

KatyMac Sat 08-Mar-14 06:38:32

My symptoms are quite subtle, and thinking about it I'm not sure the current one is lasting for 24hrs

I'll have to experiment I guess

HerGraciousMajTheBeardedPotato Sat 08-Mar-14 07:00:18

Consultant dermatologists have told me that , if I need something stronger, it is OK to combine two different OTC anti-hustamines. It is also OK to take a double dose of one-a-days, if they don't last long enough. Not 2 at a time, but 12h apart instead of 24.

Also, that with regular use sometimes the AHs become less effective, so alternating them on monthly/6weekly sets held reduce this.

I've had conflicting advice about taking AHs early, before I need them. But IME it works better to already have AHs in your system before being exposed, than to start taking them when you're already suffering.

I don't find Piriton sedating at all, but if I take it for longer than a few days I get a very dry mouth and disturbed sleep. So, while I find it generally more effective than any of the other OTC AHs, I tend to reserve it for when I need something extra.

KatyMac Sat 08-Mar-14 08:24:22

12 hours apart might work - I was thinking they might be wearing off about 14 or 15 hours later which would be a timing nightmare to manage

& then as you say Piriton as a booster if there was problem

I think I'll trial it- my current regime is not working

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