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Walking stick or not?

(29 Posts)
17leftfeet Sun 06-Oct-13 20:57:52

I'm only 35 but have altered sensation in my foot and chronic back pain (damn you MS!!!)

I'm pretty secure when I'm walking by my god it hurts

But walking sticks? They are for old people aren't they?

I don't think of myself as having a disability because I don't, so don't really want a visible cue to everyone

What to do?

If it is going to make your life more comfortable then go for it, look at them in the same way as glasses help those whose eyesight isn't great. You can get some really funky ones, they don't need to be old fogeyish. You could, if you can afford it, get different ones for different occasions.

CMOTDibbler Sun 06-Oct-13 21:08:30

My dh (41) has been using a walking stick for a few years now, and has a a hiking pole like this. A friends sister who is in her 30's likes the funky ones, and wishes she'd started using one earlier

17leftfeet Sun 06-Oct-13 21:26:13

I think I'd feel too conspicuous with a funky stick

Are the folding ones any good and then I could tuck it in my bag when I don't need it?

tolittletoolate Sun 06-Oct-13 21:28:08

I have a sparkle stick from glam sticks its lovely and very good quality too

valiumredhead Sun 06-Oct-13 21:29:44

I have a folding one I ordered on line, it's more like a hiking stick. I have it in my bag when I don't need it.

valiumredhead Sun 06-Oct-13 21:38:36
tolittletoolate Sun 06-Oct-13 21:45:00

beware when buying cheap walkung sticks that the ferrule on the bottom is actually rubber not plastic! It's a bit slippery otherwise!

I think I would feel a bit conspicuous with a funky one too. I can get quite hobbly with my arthritis and so it's something I've contemplated.

valiumredhead Sun 06-Oct-13 22:15:28

I have a lovely plain green one, that site I posted sells good quality ones, not slippy at all. Very important it's true.

hearthwitch Sun 06-Oct-13 22:17:07

my sis 36 has arthritis and a variety of canes. I say go for it.

Footle Mon 07-Oct-13 07:01:13

They are for people who feel better able to walk with one than without one.

Lottie4 Mon 07-Oct-13 09:44:38

My friend who is 46 has been using one for the last couple of years and I don't even question it.

mayihaveaboxofchoculaits Mon 07-Oct-13 10:07:55

A stick is an aid ,not a definition.
I'm 51 and use a funky'ish folding one one, I like to think I make it look cool.
It doesn't define me.
I have a little foot drop and used a fes,but last week I visited the orthotic guy who fitted me with a "foot up" instead. Much better.
MS is a bugger because no one is ever the same, and you can easily let yourself be defined by more "knowledgable"bods, which leads you down the wrong path.
What are you using for back pain?

BlissfullyIgnorant Mon 07-Oct-13 10:16:42

I have SwitchSticks - plain and patterned, all colours, fold up, have wrist straps and matching coloured ferrules. They also do accessories like stick hangers (for table edges) and a special foot for snow/ice. They're brilliant.

17leftfeet Mon 07-Oct-13 10:41:28

mayi

Either dicolfen or tramadol but I'm trying amatryptaline at the moment to see if it helps

I'm told to give it 4 weeks, I'm on week 2

excuse my rubbish spelling

Matildathecat Mon 07-Oct-13 11:57:21

I use a stick for similar problems though different cause. I also struggled with the concept. I'm 47.

I'm used to it now and use a walking pole. It's a good one with a spring which is comfortable.

Of course it stops me falling but also acts as a cue for others as to why I'm walking so slowly and I get jostled less in a crowd.

I still hate it, though...

Do you have a Blue Badge? Also useful.

valiumredhead Mon 07-Oct-13 13:24:21

Yeah,I tend to use it on public transport, keeps people awaywink

I'm 32 and use a walking stick. It's a folding one, bright green with a leaf pattern. smile I don't need it all the time but there are some days I can't walk without it, and a lot of days when I use it just in case. As well as being a practical aid it's quite useful as a visual flag to others, who otherwise wouldn't realise that I have problems.

17leftfeet Mon 07-Oct-13 13:31:47

Blue badge???

I would feel like a massive fraud, I can walk, just painfully

valiumredhead Mon 07-Oct-13 14:39:29

If it's a permanent injury/condition then you would be entitled to a bb.

Matildathecat Mon 07-Oct-13 15:25:38

I can walk too, but painfully. I was told how difficult it was to get the BB but was totally honest at the assessment and got it immediately. On good days I don't use it.

These things are hard to get your head round but they do all help.

If you fancy some support with back pain do come and join us on The Back Story.

Best wishes.

valiumredhead Mon 07-Oct-13 16:35:56

Matilda-blimey I only saw my doctor for mine,I had no idea you had to be assessed. Is that a new thing do you know?

valium where I live (Sussex) you have to apply to the council for a blue badge. Because my condition varies -ssome days I can walk up to a mile, some days I can barely walk to the bathroom - I was told I'm ineligible for a badge.

tolittletoolate Mon 07-Oct-13 22:40:15

I had an OT visit to get some equipment and while she was there she mentioned I needed to apply for a blue badge. Luckily she was transferred to the Blue Badge team and because she had seen me I didn't need any supporting evidence from my doctor.

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