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Diabetes Tests - How Often if High Risk Due To Genetics ??

(7 Posts)
sonsmum Sun 16-Dec-12 10:07:36

firstly great that you are aware and trying to avoid diabetes. My son has Type 1 so I have become pretty knowlegable in this field through experience. The one thing that has most effect on the glucose levels and metabolism of insulin is exercise, or being active : if playing sport etc isn't your thing, even a daily walk makes a difference. So if you are trying to stave off diabetes, don't just concentrate on lowering your carb level (though that will help) but also increase your level of activity.
Diabetes is a hideous and silent condition, do anything to avoid developing it if you can.

tazzle22 Fri 14-Dec-12 17:11:08

I have been testing my blood sugar last couple weeks as I have diabetes in the family too ........ I bought a meter and strips and found I am certainly prediabetic ( higher than the normal limits but not over 11).

Its not just the fasting sugar that diagnoses one as diabetic as one can be glucose intolerant at a lower but still potentially harmful level than the officially diabetic level as I am .... and that often shows up before the fasting blood sugar is high enough for a diagnosis.

I am glad I have done it as its given me wake up call to lower my intake of carbohydrates and delay (and maybe even avoid) becoming officially diabetic.

Lots of info on the website mentioned above

Given the current epidemic of diabetes one would think it woud be in the gps interest to catch us all before we get to that state so that lifestyle and diet alterations could be put in place so that we can acvoid developing it.... by the time its diagnosed there is a lot of damage done to various organs in the body........

Its one thing to have a theoretical chance which most of us, being human, ignore...... but if we have definate pointers that we are developing higher blood sugars then we can be much more proactive and motivated !

Yes, sorry, typed and ran!

I think if you test first thing in the morning and you're over 6.0, you may be heading for diabetes. And on a random test, if it is over 11.0.

Other than that, watch out for feeling very thirsty.

Footle Thu 13-Dec-12 17:06:39

Bertha's instructions are for a home GTT , a good thing to do in your circs but not very often , it's horrid for your liver and pancreas - which is one reason why the GP won't give you one regularly.
During the two hours , just sit around not doing much, otherwise you will be burning up the glucose instead of leaving it alone so you can measure the spike ie the highest point.

Nothing to eat after 10pm other than water
First thing in the morning, test your blood glucose with a meter purchased from Boots or similar for £10 - £15
drink 400ml original Lucozade quite quickly
Wait two hours (nothing else to eat or drink) and test again

The pre-drink reading should be < 6.0 and at 2 hours <7.8 ( www.diabetes.co.uk/oral-glucose-tolerance-test.html ). Above that, go see your doctor armed with your results.

Footle Thu 13-Dec-12 16:15:37

Your blood glucose levels are not a medical secret . You can keep track of them by buying a meter for about £12 ( online if you like ) and some test strips, and doing a bit of research about sensible times of day to test , eg as soon as you wake , before a meal , and after eating - you need to find out whether 1 or 2 hours after the first mouthful gives you the highest reading. Strips are expensive, which is why the NHS doesn't prescribe them to most type 2s, so you won't want to be doing this too often. Maybe one day every month for a while ? Don't trap yourself into doing it obsessively, it's pointless. Your research will show you what good levels and bad levels are. Armed with this knowledge ( I do like that phrase ) and assuming that your meter is reliable , you can go back to the GP - or another GP you trust more - and ask for a formal test, whether GTT or HbA1c.

rockinhippy Thu 13-Dec-12 13:12:52

I'm just wondering if anyone knows if there is a rule/guideline on this & type of tests best to diagnose as I've had problems getting my GP to test me even though both my parents have type 2 & all the women on my mothers side bar myself & a younger cousin.

I do have a lot of health problems & some symptoms keeping coming back to diabetes, I do eat well so probably mostly eat a low GI diet, as I have always known it was on the cards for me, especially as tests I had with my previous GPs some 20 years ago came up as positive, borderline etc.

My GP insists that as I'm not officially over weight & that I haven't lost weight I can't be diabetic, she has only tested me once in over 10 years & that was a basic blood test years ago - in the past it was a glucose tolerance test that showed up as positive etc - I'm realising lately that more symptoms I have complained to her about are potentially diabetes too, so want to go back & push for testing, but expecting a battle againhmm

Neither of my parents lost weight before being diagnosed, they both put weight on, but not technically overwieght in my Dads case - I have put quite a bit of weight on, but as I was always tiny, that still means I am considered to be an ideal weight to the medical powers that be[rollseyes]

Should my GP be testing me more regularly ?? & if so what test, surely with a healthy diet the GTT makes more sense ??

TIA

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