Predicted grades not good enough for where dd wants to study...worth applying anyway?

(69 Posts)
dottyaboutstripes Wed 28-Sep-11 22:46:28

DD wants to be a primary school teacher and has predicted grades of CCC. All the unis she is interested in ask for BBB. Today, her head of 6th form told her there was no point in even applying to her preferred unis and suggested other possibilities (apparently there are very few asking for the kind of points she's predicted and she's not wanting to go to any of them)

My question is - is there really no point in even trying? That seems utterly defeatist to me! In all honesty, I don't think she's capable of achieving Bs, but is there really no chance in hell that she might possible get offered a place somewhere she actually would like to study? I mean, isn't it entirely possible that applications will go down with the £9k fees being introduced etc etc?

Well done to her dotty, my ds has just started primary qts with maths.

Hope she enjoys it and makes a great teacher.

mumblechum1 Tue 18-Sep-12 14:57:08

smile So glad it all worked out in the end Dotty

dottyaboutstripes Tue 18-Sep-12 14:49:06

She got BCD in the end - she had worked hard and was hoping in fact for BBC, so she was disappointed, but after a stressful few days in clearing, it all seems to have worked out really well. She was reluctant to call Roehampton as she couldn't believe they would be interested with her grades but they were and offered her a place immediately after her interview....she hadn't been considering London originally as she wanted to be in the NW.
I have no idea how she will cope with the workload etc but I had a lovely phone call this morning from a very happy and excited fresher grin She is my PFB (of 6 lovely kids!) so we are all going to miss her like mad. I'm just made up for her!

madwomanintheattic Mon 17-Sep-12 19:42:02

I bet Roehampton wasn't on the original list of places she wanted to go. grin

<disclaimer - I went to roehampton. before they kept changing the name. grin>

Hope she enjoys it x

WofflingOn Mon 17-Sep-12 19:41:33

That's great news!
Did she better her teachers' predictions?
You were right in your OP though, the number of applicants has dropped significantly this year, freeing up spaces. So she was right not to give up, let's hope she enjoys the hard work ahead.

Great update!

Tressy Mon 17-Sep-12 19:21:08

OP's DD got a place this year. Congratulations to her.

A few of DD's friends got into their chosen uni's for teaching and other courses too, with grades below their offers this year.

jkklpu Mon 17-Sep-12 19:14:10

If she's dead set on this path, she could work her socks of this year, get the required grades and apply in Clearing or for the following year. Don't waste the applications.

mumblechum1 Mon 17-Sep-12 19:11:37

Great news, Dotty, hope she enjoys it. So what did she get in the end?

gingeroots Mon 17-Sep-12 19:07:30

That's fantastic news ,well done to your daughter and to you .

And thanks for update .

dottyaboutstripes Mon 17-Sep-12 14:19:05

I just thought I would update this old thread to say that we dropped our dd off at Roehampton yesterday, where she got a place through clearing to study Primary Education with QTS. She was also offered a place and several other interviews elsewhere through clearing....it seems that there were lots of places left after A Level results day.

So of course she realises she has to knuckle down to some really hard work...I'm so happy she's getting the chance of realising her dream

Pachelbel Mon 14-Nov-11 00:37:57

As a student currently studying for a BEd with QTS and specialising in Early Years and Key Stage One, I can certainly vouch for the fact that Primary Ed courses are very academic.
I may 'only' be teaching number bonds to ten etc, but the level that we are expected to work at as aspiring professionals is an awful lot higher.

As others have rightly said, competition to get a place is tough. There are 250 students on my course, however I know countless people who applied and didn't get an offer, even though a lot of them did in fact get the grades they needed. Many of them are now studying similar courses such as Education tuies, with a view to doing a PGCE or SCITT when they graduate.

I hate to say it, but if it really is unlikely that your DD will get the grades she needs, then it's extremely unlikely that she'll be offered a place on the course she wants.

Maybe look into applying for Early Childhood or Education Studies degrees which would be a stepping stone into a PGCE or similar route?

ellisbell Fri 11-Nov-11 08:41:27

dottyaboutstripes despite the fee increases applications don't seem to be massively down this year. They will be lower than last year but not necessarily at the universities your daughter is interested in. There is far more competition now than when I applied to university. So she has 2 clear choices - lower her sights and go to a university that will consider her or delay her application while working really hard to get her grades up. She can resit if necessary.

Teaching is about more than simply what grades you get or what degree you get but when applying for her first job those are the things she is likely to be judged on.

sashh Fri 11-Nov-11 08:12:57

Does she really want to be a teacher? If that is her ultimate aim then she is going to have to go to a uni that is not one of her preffered universities.

It really is a waste applying for a BBB course with CCC predictions, they will not look beyond the predicted grades.

There are other options such a degree followed by a PGCE or 'teach first'.

startail Mon 17-Oct-11 01:36:54

The world has gone mad, modern A'level grades are just nuts.
Mine are ABCD, the A was for biology which I did basically for fun. And actually ended up studying to PG level, but that's a long story. Very few people got As and Three bS got a friend to medical school

sqweegiebeckenheim Mon 17-Oct-11 01:00:42

limiting oneself to just KS1 is a bad idea - schools can and do pluck teachers and drop them into new classes year on year (4 years in Nursery, before being dropped into Y6!). Teachers often don't have the luxury of choosing the classes they want to teach.

Teaching has several work based/ non- uni routes - GTP (after a degree), and RTP (no degree). May also be worth considering for the down the line.

PastGrace Wed 12-Oct-11 00:05:30

Helo I'm in my final year and went to Edge Hill for a primary PGCE open day - they don't require a 2:1. I specifically asked and they said that they consider all applications on individual merit, and a 2:2 might be enough depending on the rest of the application.

sayithowitis Tue 11-Oct-11 23:41:11

Do you know what? some of the best teachers I know, are the ones who, according to some on here, 'scraped' into university. There is so much more to teaching than raw exam grades. And yes, I know that you need to get decent grades, but to claim that C is not acceptable? Really?

One of Dc1's most highly qualified teachers was a PHD in his subject. So, undoubtedly, a highly intelligent man. Could he teach that subject? could he hell! Most of the students in his A level set ended up having private tuition. And they were the only ones in the set who got anything like reasonable grades!

WRT your DD, do you think she would look at doing a foundation year? It is highly possible that she would get a place and then, providing she passes that, would automatically go forward onto the full degree course. I would also make sure that any university application includes info about the fact that she had major surgery in her AS year. presumably she missed some time and this could easily have impacted upon her predicted grades.

DC1 missed an enormous chunk of A2 year due to illness and therefore grades weren't exactly top drawer. But this was mentioned in personal statement, to explain discrepancy between GCSE grades and A2 grades. It was also confirmed by the school's reference. DC1 did a foundation year at first choice university, one which would not normally have considered them even for the foundation course! Was top achiever in the year, ended up with an average pass rate of 90%+ and is now on course for a really good degree in a subject which is recognised as one of the most difficult. ( Science) And wants to teach at primary level.

I wish your DD every success and would advise her to go for it!

Betelguese Sun 09-Oct-11 00:49:12

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

homeaway Mon 03-Oct-11 12:05:47

I am shocked at some of the really negative comments on here. Just because you dont get high A level grades it does not mean that you are not bright or can't go on to university. The Sunday times prints a guide to the top 100 universities and their admission criteria which might be useful. If she does an additional AS or A level in another subject which you could pay for privately , then she could get the points she needs to go. Spend some time with her on the UCAS site and help her look for a university that will suit her. Her personal statement is very important and she should see if she can get some teaching experience that she can put on there. I really hope that she gets into a great uni smile

Hi loving, sorry i didn't mean you. I meant the posters who said, why even bother, and the I wouldn't want my child taught by someone who scraped in.

Good luck to your dd dotty

rosy71 Sat 01-Oct-11 10:07:09

Where exactly does she want to go??? I've just looked at Reading University (much more prestigious university than Wolverhampton) and the offer was 180 points.

Loshad Sat 01-Oct-11 00:13:31

loving, but academic rigour doesn't always translate into A level results. FWIW the first time i sat my a levels I got DDE (sat a year early) I resat, got BBC, went to russell group uni, then did a PhD, worked as research fellow, published well over 30 papers as first author, plus books, plus chapters in books - think i could honestly say that was academic rigour, am now a secondary teacher.
It is rather a blinkered and narrow view anyway that only the most academic make the best teachers.
FWIW when i did teacher training my mentor was most worried that with my academic background i would struggle to get on the wavelength with lower sets! That would be the DDE then, or possible the PhD from a prestigious uni (turned down an offer from Cambridge) and the research papers hmm

DownbytheRiverside Sat 01-Oct-11 00:13:00

I have found that you need both good grammar and spelling to cope as a teacher. Do you proof read your posts? It is advisable.

adamschic Sat 01-Oct-11 00:11:20

It seems to be getting more competative out there. As far as uni visits are concerned there are just as much interest this year as last year which might indicate that the fees haven't put students off.

Also A* to B grades are currency for the best uni's but I am suprised that CCC isn't good enough for teaching.

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