What reasons do you give for wanting to foster?

(4 Posts)
tigerzzzz Fri 01-Mar-13 23:28:21

I've finally made the call - got a SW from the LA coming out to meet me soon. I'm looking at doing respite care to start with, and maybe moving on to long-term in the future.

I've been wanting to foster for a really long time. I just don't think I've actually thought through the reasons why. When I spoke to the LA I was asked why and I spluttered a bit and gave a very wishy washy answer. I also told a friend that night, and she asked me why I wanted to, and again I couldn't really answer her. I realise that the SW will also ask, along with absolutely everyone I know, and I'm going to have to come up with a good reason. I do know why, but I can't bring myself to say it! My reasons are:

1 - Because I think it's an amazing thing to do and I have the space and time and hate the thought of children going through what some children suffer

2 - Because I only have one child and now can no longer have children. I always wanted more. Plus my daughter is reaching the teenage years and no longer needs me as much, so I'm not feeling very useful to anyone and I think it would satisfy a need.

3 - I think I'm a good parent and I hope I would make a good foster carer.

So that's 1 - Cheesy and do-goody, 2 - selfish and 3 - arrogant!

So what reasons do others give? I'm not looking for a "right" answer, just curious.

musickeepsmesane Fri 01-Mar-13 23:54:44

ummm....these are pretty much the same reasons I foster. Tho' another of mine was that I was pretty bored at work. Just blah blah blah all day long. I was working with people who had nice, comfy lives and they were so dissatisfied, I couldn't take looking at their miserable faces any longer. I had wanted to foster for a long time, packed in 9 to 5 after the assessment and have never looked back. In fact, wish I had done it years ago.

lovesmileandlaugh Sat 02-Mar-13 12:54:33

I think your reasons are pretty standard. My only thought was they may ask you why fostering over adoption, particularly as you are considering long term!

Good luck!!!

chroniclackofimagination Sat 02-Mar-13 14:15:36

Those are great reasons. They will want to see that you can prioritise the needs of children over your own or those of other adults (as every parent must) but there is no problem in you realising that caring for a child will meet some of your own emotional needs. Thinking you are a good parent is in no way arrogant, although they will also ask you to consider what you might do differently. The assessment they do on you will ask how you relate to children and adults and about your experiences as a parent.

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